Broad Curriculum Program | Florence, Italy

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The FSU Florence broad curriculum program gives you the opportunity to earn credits in both general requirements and elective courses in a variety of disciplines while living in the birthplace of the Renaissance, the city of Florence.

Each semester offers students the opportunity to explore the city’s art museums, rich cultural history, and authentic restaurants. Program excursions – included in the program fee – give you a chance to explore outside the city in other areas of Tuscany. Past program excursions have included overnight trips to places such as Rome and Venice, a trip to an organic vineyard, a night at the opera, and more. In addition to program-planned excursions, free time for personal travel gives you the chance to explore Italy on your own. Each semester offers opportunities to volunteer and interact with local organizations and citizens. FSU Florence offers broad curriculum programs as well as programs focused on specific majors and minors such as hospitality, fashion merchandising, and communication.

Program Description

Program Sessions

Do not purchase airline tickets until advised to do so by International Programs.

CodeTermStart DateEnd DateFeeApply
FL03Summer 202405/06/2408/01/24$17,995.00Closed
FL02Summer 202406/20/2408/01/24$9,525.00Closed
FL04Fall 202408/29/2412/12/24$17,995.00Closed
FL05Spring 202501/09/2504/24/25$17,995.00

Eligibility

This program is open to all interested students. Pursuant to Italian legal requirements, students interested in studying in Italy must be at least 18 years of age by the start of the program. Contact IP-Info@fsu.edu for more information.

Study Center

The FSU Florence Program is housed in a newly restored sixteenth-century Renaissance palace and is located in the heart of the historical downtown of the city. It is a short walk from the Ponte Vecchio, the Uffizi Gallery, and Piazza della Signoria. FSU Florence features an atrium with a café, an extensive library in the former courtyard, interior & exterior student lounges, classrooms, state-of-the-art fashion and media labs, as well as a Tuscan-style tasting & learning kitchen. 24/7 on-site staffing ensures student safety is the top priority. 

Click here to learn more about FSU Florence

Housing

Housing on these programs is in shared Florentine-style student residences within a 25-minute walk of FSU Florence along beautiful medieval cobblestone streets. Each residence includes shared, furnished living, kitchen, and dining spaces, as well as washing machines, Wi-Fi, and a cleaning service with a change of bed linens and towels. Meal vouchers that can be redeemed at dozens of local cafés and restaurants throughout Florence are also provided. Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. Please click here for a listing of recommended hotels in Florence.

Excursions & Group Activities

Group activities and excursions vary per session and may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities. There are generally two overnight excursions in the fall and spring semesters and one overnight excursion during each summer session. Cultural immersion and social events planned for this program may include the following.

Overnight Excursions

Rome: Colosseum, Pantheon, Roman Forum, St. Peter’s Basilica, Sistine Chapel, Vatican Museum, and Trevi Fountain
Venice: Burano, Torcello, St. Mark’s Basilica, Gallerie dell’Accademia, and Peggy Guggenheim Museum
Naples: Mt. Vesuvius, Pompeii, Herculaneum, Positano, and Greek temples of Paestum
Verona & Lake Garda: Romeo and Juliet’s house, and live opera in the ancient Roman amphitheater of Verona, and the lakeside castle of Sirmione

Two-Day Excursions

San Gimignano, Siena, San Galgano, organic vineyard, Ravenna, and Bologna

Class Excursions

Ferragamo Museum, Galileo Museum, Gucci Museum, Uffizi Gallery, Accademia Gallery, Machiavelli’s house, Dante’s house, archaeological sites, churches, and artisan workshops

Other Potential Activities

Sunset Arno River Boat tour, Cooking classes, Fresco-making activity, International school soccer tournament, Ceramic-making activity, Volunteer opportunities, Fiorentina Series A soccer games, Night at the Opera

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • Instructional costs for up to 16 IP credit hours (12-week+ sessions) or up to 10 IP credit hours (6-week summer sessions)
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • 10 meal vouchers per week while school is in session (each worth approximately 5 euros)
  • Group meals including welcome dinner, dinner on group trips, some holiday dinners, farewell dinner
  • Program-planned excursions/group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • On-site administrative & pastoral support
  • Health insurance
  • 24/7 student support
  • IP welcome gift

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted on program calendar)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., per credit hour technology fee)
  • Course-related fees (e.g., theatre tickets)

Courses

To speak with the International Programs Academic Advisor about study abroad courses, you can visit our zoom drop-in advising hours on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 10:00am-12:00pm. There are also appointments available via Campus Connect on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. If these times do not work for you, contact our advisor directly at IP-AcademicAdvising@fsu.edu to make an appointment.

IP provides CoreFSU requirement areas to help students make informed decisions. Although every attempt is made to be accurate & current, these designations can be fluid and it is the student’s responsibility to confirm all CoreFSU requirement areas through the CoreFSU Course Search Tool and your major advisor.

Florence Study Center Minor

The Florence Study Center Minor enhances and focuses a student’s program in Italy. It requires 15 credits, 9 of which must be earned in Florence and include a cultural component. Students can choose from various disciplinary perspectives on Italian  Studies. A maximum of 9 hours may be counted in a single academic discipline. A minimum grade of “C-“ must be earned and a minimum grade point average of 2.0 must be maintained for all courses taken for the minor.
Contact IP-AcademicAdvisor@fsu.edu for more information. 

Session FL02Summer 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

The course is set against the historical background of Florence and looks at art and architecture in the context of patronage; that of the church, the guilds, the merchants and the Medici, the ruling family of the city. The Renaissance produced outstanding artists such as Donatello, Botticelli, Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael; but these artists could not have existed without their patrons. It is this inter-connection which is our theme. The course will examine the emergence of Renaissance Florence via site visits to churches, palaces, museums and classroom sessions. The story is an unprecedented and excititng one: one small city produced a staggering array of artistic talent in a short period of time. Classical antiquity was the model, not only in artistic terms but in philosophical and political ones as well: Florence saw the rebirth of classical antiquity. The impact of that rebirth, that renaissance, still affects us today: our ways of thought, our ways of seeing are conditioned by that momentous period which changed the past forever, and ushered in the first modern era.
3
ART1300CDrawing Foundations

This course includes creative expression and communication using a variety of black and white media.
3
BUL3310The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

This course offers an introduction to the legal setting in which business operates. Emphasis is on public and regulatory law and on the social, political, and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Subjects include the nature of law and legal process, administrative law, business and the Constitution, statutory and common law, and related topics.
3
CTE3512History of Dress

The course explores the development of Western costumes from the 15th century to the present fashion trends as a reflection of socio-cultural factors including cultural values, ethnicity, gender, class, art, customs, economy, politics, religion, geography. Through visits and hands-on activities students investigate the relationship between the fashion phenomenon and the main revolutions in technology, the most recent transformations occurred in the European society, with a specific node to the Italian and France case. During the theory portion, students will participate in a wide range of activities that aim to also deepen the practical aspects of working and production. The final lessons pay attention to a conscious and critical study of the most contemporary issues related to global overproduction, and consumption in the fashion industry.
3
HUM4931Topics in Civilization of Italy: Modern Italian Culture**

This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.
3
HUN2125Food and Society

This course examines the impact of society on human food ways, role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.
3
IDS2411The Italian Mafia from Corleone to the Globalized World

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach, considering the historical determinants of the mafia as presented by the current literature. A major focus is the identification of the root causes of the mafia and the political, social, historical factors that made possible its genesis and development.
3
IDS3330The Culture is in the Cuisine: The Food of Italy

This course explores the cultural history of Italian cuisine from its ancient roots to contemporary times. Students examine how culinary practices and the culture of food are essential elements of "Italian" identity.
3
IND2219Design and the Human Experience

Course is approved for Liberal Studies and meets the Humanities and Cultural Practice FSU requirement. This course focuses on the impact of design on the human experience. It is a gateway experience in which students will explore the nature of design, creativity, and problem solving. The course will introduce some of the major theories from the design disciplines of interiors, architecture, landscape architecture, and products design, and provide students with an awareness, understanding, and enthusiasm for design and its impact on our lives.
3
IND2305Sketching the City

This course will provide an introduction to achromatic and poly-chromatic media used in observational sketching with an emphasis on quick sketch techniques and graphic expression of shape and form in the built environment.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2220Reading & Conversation

This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
ITT3501Modern Italian Culture**

This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
REE3043Real Estate

This course is a survey introduction to real estate, real estate evaluation, and real estate investment decision making. The course, in addition to REE 4433, meets the FREC educational requirement for real estate sales licensing.
3
Session FL03: Summer 2024
Students must choose at least two classes from FL01 and two classes from FL02
Session FL02Summer 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

The course is set against the historical background of Florence and looks at art and architecture in the context of patronage; that of the church, the guilds, the merchants and the Medici, the ruling family of the city. The Renaissance produced outstanding artists such as Donatello, Botticelli, Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael; but these artists could not have existed without their patrons. It is this inter-connection which is our theme. The course will examine the emergence of Renaissance Florence via site visits to churches, palaces, museums and classroom sessions. The story is an unprecedented and excititng one: one small city produced a staggering array of artistic talent in a short period of time. Classical antiquity was the model, not only in artistic terms but in philosophical and political ones as well: Florence saw the rebirth of classical antiquity. The impact of that rebirth, that renaissance, still affects us today: our ways of thought, our ways of seeing are conditioned by that momentous period which changed the past forever, and ushered in the first modern era.
3
ART1300CDrawing Foundations

This course includes creative expression and communication using a variety of black and white media.
3
BUL3310The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

This course offers an introduction to the legal setting in which business operates. Emphasis is on public and regulatory law and on the social, political, and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Subjects include the nature of law and legal process, administrative law, business and the Constitution, statutory and common law, and related topics.
3
CTE3512History of Dress

The course explores the development of Western costumes from the 15th century to the present fashion trends as a reflection of socio-cultural factors including cultural values, ethnicity, gender, class, art, customs, economy, politics, religion, geography. Through visits and hands-on activities students investigate the relationship between the fashion phenomenon and the main revolutions in technology, the most recent transformations occurred in the European society, with a specific node to the Italian and France case. During the theory portion, students will participate in a wide range of activities that aim to also deepen the practical aspects of working and production. The final lessons pay attention to a conscious and critical study of the most contemporary issues related to global overproduction, and consumption in the fashion industry.
3
HUM4931Topics in Civilization of Italy: Modern Italian Culture**

This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.
3
HUN2125Food and Society

This course examines the impact of society on human food ways, role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.
3
IDS2411The Italian Mafia from Corleone to the Globalized World

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach, considering the historical determinants of the mafia as presented by the current literature. A major focus is the identification of the root causes of the mafia and the political, social, historical factors that made possible its genesis and development.
3
IDS3330The Culture is in the Cuisine: The Food of Italy

This course explores the cultural history of Italian cuisine from its ancient roots to contemporary times. Students examine how culinary practices and the culture of food are essential elements of "Italian" identity.
3
IND2219Design and the Human Experience

Course is approved for Liberal Studies and meets the Humanities and Cultural Practice FSU requirement. This course focuses on the impact of design on the human experience. It is a gateway experience in which students will explore the nature of design, creativity, and problem solving. The course will introduce some of the major theories from the design disciplines of interiors, architecture, landscape architecture, and products design, and provide students with an awareness, understanding, and enthusiasm for design and its impact on our lives.
3
IND2305Sketching the City

This course will provide an introduction to achromatic and poly-chromatic media used in observational sketching with an emphasis on quick sketch techniques and graphic expression of shape and form in the built environment.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2220Reading & Conversation

This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
ITT3501Modern Italian Culture**

This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
REE3043Real Estate

This course is a survey introduction to real estate, real estate evaluation, and real estate investment decision making. The course, in addition to REE 4433, meets the FREC educational requirement for real estate sales licensing.
3
Session FL04Fall 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ANT2410Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

This course introduces the origin and development of human lifeways with emphasis on non-Western societies. A comparative perspective is used to examine language, social organization, religion, values, and technology. Attention is also given to contemporary world problems.
3
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH3391The Renaissance Apprentice: Artistic Practice in Fifteenth Century Florence

A course that combines an art historical and artistic approach to studying Renaissance art. Students will study traditional techniques using the same master-apprentice system used in the Renaissance. They will begin with basic drawing exercises then advance to sculpting and painting using the city of Florence as their classroom.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

The course is set against the historical background of Florence and looks at art and architecture in the context of patronage; that of the church, the guilds, the merchants and the Medici, the ruling family of the city. The Renaissance produced outstanding artists such as Donatello, Botticelli, Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael; but these artists could not have existed without their patrons. It is this inter-connection which is our theme. The course will examine the emergence of Renaissance Florence via site visits to churches, palaces, museums and classroom sessions. The story is an unprecedented and excititng one: one small city produced a staggering array of artistic talent in a short period of time. Classical antiquity was the model, not only in artistic terms but in philosophical and political ones as well: Florence saw the rebirth of classical antiquity. The impact of that rebirth, that renaissance, still affects us today: our ways of thought, our ways of seeing are conditioned by that momentous period which changed the past forever, and ushered in the first modern era.
3
ART1300CDrawing I

This course includes creative expression and communication using a variety of black and white media.
3
AST1002Planets/Stars/Galaxies

This course provides general acquaintance with some of the facts, concepts and scientific methods of astronomy. As a liberal study course, the goal is to help students learn some basic facts of astronomy as well as gain an appreciation of astronomy as a science, the universe, and the current scientific ideas about its history and its future.
3
CLA2010Peoples of the Roman World

This introductory level course engages with the Roman world from the point of view of the people who lived there. Students study the different kinds of people who inhabited the Roman Empire, focusing on its multiethnic and diverse populaces, and on the ways in which, as in a modern city, rather different groups may have come into contact with one another.
3
CLA4935Conservation of Archeological Artifacts

The seminar laboratory course is strictly linked to the archaeological site at Cetamura in the Chianti which was begun in 1973. In the last 50 years excavations by FSU students have yielded an enormous amount of information and material culture from the Etruscan, Roman and Medieval periods. The laboratory course is designed to offer students an introduction to archaeological conservation where students will have the unique opportunity to handle, conserve and learn about ancient artifacts as well as how to implement conservation strategies for their future preservation.
3
CLT3378Ancient Mythology, East West

This course provides students with an introduction to the mythological traditions from a diverse group of ancient cultures, including those of Greece and Rome, the Near East, Northern Europe, India, China, Africa, and the Americas.
3
COM3930Fashion and Media**

Fashion is by its very nature a communication tool. Clothes and garments are powerful vehicles of meanings and values, able to shape an individual’s personality as well as an entire “spirit of time”. This course traces the multiple connections between the fashion and media industries, from the birth of fashion magazines in France in the late XVII century, until today, an era characterized by the digital and one-to-one communication model. The course emphasizes the material realities, pragmatic and creative dynamisms, fantasy components, and essential visual faces of fashion. We will analyze all the most important fashion media channels, highlighting the specific characteristics of each medium: magazines & editorials, photography, movies, TV commercials, shops & retail spaces, videos, exhibitions, fashion shows, blogs and social media. The course will end with a real TV interview made by students to some of the leading fashion designers and creative people of the Italian fashion system and industry. Please note: For this course to count toward the major, students must apply for and be admitted to the School of Communication.
3
COM4561Social Media Campaigns

This course prepares students to design and implement a social media campaign, and introduces them to the social, political and ethical contexts of using new technologies. Students on the course take over the FSU Florence Instagram and Facebook accounts, providing them with practical, hands-on experience with social media management.
3
CTE1401Introduction to Textile Science

The course introduces students to physical, chemical, design, technical aspects of fibers, yarns, fabrics, finishes, textiles coloration, reusing, recycling, and circular production thanks to the collaboration with textiles mills, entrepreneurs, and artisans who have been experiencing the production in Italy since from the Middle Ages. Interrelationships between textile characteristics, properties and end-use requirements are analyzed. Terminology, organization, and structure of this multi-faceted industry will be highlighted. Students will familiarize themselves with fabric specimens, and hands-on projects to enhance their experiential learning. Many changes are brought about constantly by technical advancements in the ever-changing environment of this highly technical industry. Major changes and development in the world of textiles will be covered. The emphasis of textiles as a major international industry will be examined thanks to the collaboration with professionals, students will apply the theory to the handmade projects they will make and present over the term to better understand the entire production supply chain.
3
CTE3512History of Dress

The course explores the development of Western costumes from the 15th century to the present fashion trends as a reflection of socio-cultural factors including cultural values, ethnicity, gender, class, art, customs, economy, politics, religion, geography. Through visits and hands-on activities students investigate the relationship between the fashion phenomenon and the main revolutions in technology, the most recent transformations occurred in the European society, with a specific node to the Italian and France case. During the theory portion, students will participate in a wide range of activities that aim to also deepen the practical aspects of working and production. The final lessons pay attention to a conscious and critical study of the most contemporary issues related to global overproduction, and consumption in the fashion industry.
3
CTE4937Fashion and Media**

Fashion is by its very nature a communication tool. Clothes and garments are powerful vehicles of meanings and values, able to shape an individual’s personality as well as an entire “spirit of time”. This course traces the multiple connections between the fashion and media industries, from the birth of fashion magazines in France in the late XVII century, until today, an era characterized by the digital and one-to-one communication model. The course emphasizes the material realities, pragmatic and creative dynamisms, fantasy components, and essential visual faces of fashion. We will analyze all the most important fashion media channels, highlighting the specific characteristics of each medium: magazines & editorials, photography, movies, TV commercials, shops & retail spaces, videos, exhibitions, fashion shows, blogs and social media. The course will end with a real TV interview made by students to some of the leading fashion designers and creative people of the Italian fashion system and industry.
3
CTE4937Introduction to Italian Fashion and Culture

“Made in Italy” is much more than just a geographical reference; Made in Italy is a promise. A promise of style, culture and know-how embedded in each true Italian “good”. This course covers the key moments in the development of this legacy, based on the combination between tangible and cultural values, and innovation and heritage. The course analyzes the key moments in the development of Italian fashion in relation to Italian culture and society, from its roots in the Renaissance through to the cultural shift of “economic miracle” and modernity in the 20th century, then on the current Made in Italy design and its protagonists compared with the international scenario. Fashion is always a matter of at least three elements: production; representation and consumption. During this course we will stress all of these main issues, helped by on-site visits to museums, fashion industries and craftsmanship laboratories in order to illustrate Italy and particularly Florence’s dominant role in fashion yesterday, today and tomorrow. The course will end with a proposal for a fashion exhibition about Made in Italy, that will be presented to some of the leading Italian textile & fashion museums.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course stresses the importance of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, as well as the importance of using writing as a recursive process involving invention, drafting, collaboration, revision, rereading, and editing to clearly and effectively communicate ideas for specific purposes, occasions, and audiences. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH3431Modern Italy***

This course traces the development of Italy from the Enlightenment to the present. Discussions concentrate on the major social, political, and intellectual currents, centering on the unification movement, the crisis of the Liberal State, and Fascism.
3
EUH3436Italy During World War II

This course provides an introduction to how the Second World War developed and evolved in Italy from 1940 until 1945. In the course, students begin by examining the origins of fascism and the radicalization of Italian foreign policy in the 1930s before focusing on how Italy was affected by war between 1940-1945, when long-standing political, social, and economic divisions in Italian society were deepened and intensified by warfare.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HFT2062International Wine and Culture

This course provides an introduction to wines of the world with a focus upon the importance to global cultures. Students learn about these regional wines and the interrelationship with their cultures and heritage.
3
HFT4866Wine and Culture

This course is an introduction to basic wine knowledge that, together with wine tasting, enhances student understanding and appreciation of wine and its place in our culture and heritage. Restricted to students 21 years of age and older. May not be taken as an S/U course.
3
HUM2235Humanities: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.
3
HUM4931Italian Life & Culture***

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity. We will go to an historical café and to a museum.
3
IDS2060Global Engagement (online)

This course gives students the opportunity to study a different country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with their own through actively participating in cultural experiences.
1
IDS2397The Politics of Attention

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to examine how attention, or its absence, impacts our political landscape and social existence. The ultimate objective is to comprehend how to liberate human existence from the forces of intelligent persuasion that have so far colonized it.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2220Reading and Conversation

This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
ITT3501Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present***

This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.
3
ITT3523Italian Cinema

This course offers and introduction to Italian cinema: history, practices, and protagonists. Taught in English.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MGF1130Mathematical Thinking

In this course, students utilize multiple means of problem solving through student-centered mathematical exploration. The course is designed to teach students to think more effectively and vastly increase their problem-solving ability through practical application and divergent thinking. This course is appropriate for students in a wide range of disciplines/programs. Completion of two years of high school algebra is recommended prior to taking this course.
3
PSY2012General Psychology

This course is a broad overview covering important psychological principles and findings within the major subfields of psychology, and the basic scientific methods employed. A "bio-psycho-social" approach is emphasized throughout so that all behaviors (including how we think, feel, and act) are discussed in terms of biological, psychological, and social determinants and consequences.
3
RTV3101Writing for the Electronic Media

This course teaches non-fiction writing for recently evolved electronic media and fosters an understanding of the theory and practice of writing for those media. The course includes a graphics element and culminates in the production of the FSU Florence student magazine, ItaliaNoles.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
WOH2202Mortal Combat: Eurasian Worlds of War

This course familiarizes the student with the role of war and military history in shaping the history of Eurasia since 1200.
3
Session FL05Spring 2025
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, & Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH3150Art & Architecture of Ancient Italy

This course is a survey of Italian art and archaeology including early Italy, the Etruscans, and Rome with reference to the major monuments, works, and archaeological evidence.
3
ARH3391The Renaissance Apprentice: Artistic Practice in Fifteenth Century Florence

A course that combines an art historical and artistic approach to studying Renaissance art. Students will study traditional techniques using the same master-apprentice system used in the Renaissance. They will begin with basic drawing exercises then advance to sculpting and painting using the city of Florence as their classroom.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

The course is set against the historical background of Florence and looks at art and architecture in the context of patronage; that of the church, the guilds, the merchants and the Medici, the ruling family of the city. The Renaissance produced outstanding artists such as Donatello, Botticelli, Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael; but these artists could not have existed without their patrons. It is this inter-connection which is our theme. The course will examine the emergence of Renaissance Florence via site visits to churches, palaces, museums and classroom sessions. The story is an unprecedented and excititng one: one small city produced a staggering array of artistic talent in a short period of time. Classical antiquity was the model, not only in artistic terms but in philosophical and political ones as well: Florence saw the rebirth of classical antiquity. The impact of that rebirth, that renaissance, still affects us today: our ways of thought, our ways of seeing are conditioned by that momentous period which changed the past forever, and ushered in the first modern era.
3
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics (online)

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CLA4935Seminar Classical Civilization

Special topics in classical culture presented around a seminar format.
3
COM4560Social Marketing

This course is an overview and application of social marketing principles and campaigns. The course is designed to familiarize students with current theory and knowledge in the field of social marketing and to provide students experience with planning a social marketing campaign.
3
CTE4707International Topics in Design Industry: Entrepreneurial Families: History and Tradition of Italian Fashion Houses

This course offers an in-depth study of designers and of the design industry in international sites. Students gain a perspective on the influence of fashion on economic, social, artistic, and global culture.
3
CTE4937Fashion and Craftsmanship in Florence

The course focuses on the evolving craftsmanship tradition in Florence; from the Renaissance artisans to the makers of the future. Combining a chronological and thematic approach students will learn both the tangible and intangible value of the authentic fashion Made in Italy. The experiential learning approach will expose the students to the making of handmade fashion goods under the guidance of masters, both in the classroom and on-site. They will start experiencing basic techniques having each semester the possibility of collaborating with professionals, entrepreneurs, emerging creatives, independent designers, established companies, then they will progress to the making of their final artisanal prototypes, finally presenting them in an exhibition or installation entirely designed by themselves. Special focus is the role of Italian craftsmanship as a model for the circular and sustainable fashion system.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH320519th Century Europe

This course is an introduction to key themes and problems in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Although this is an upper-level course, no prior background in European history is required.
3
EVR1001Environmental Science

This course is an introduction to environmental science that covers the basic functioning of the earth's environmental system and human effects on that system.
3
EVR1001LEnvironmental Science Lab (Online)

Corequisite: EVR 1001.
1
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HFT2890International Food and Culture

The course is designed to explore the world’s cuisines with a focus on the history of culinary arts, indigenous ingredients, customs, protocol, celebrations, religions, and various cooking methods and terminology.
3
IDS2166Art as Propaganda: The Impact of Visual and Performing Arts on Western Society

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
IDS2411The Italian Mafia: From Corleone to the Globalized World

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
IDS3195Vistas on Florence: From Dante to the Big Flood of 1966

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2220Reading and Conversation

This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
ITT3500Italian Civilization: Origins to the Age of Romanticism

This course is an introduction to artistic, intellectual, social, and political trends in Italy from pre-Roman times to the Age of Romanticism with specific reference to Medieval and Renaissance Italy as a center of culture in Europe. Offered in English.
3
ITT3523Italian Cinema

This course offers and introduction to Italian cinema: history, practices, and protagonists. Taught in English.
3
LIT3024Perspectives on the Short Story

This course introduces students to the critical reading of short stories dating from the nineteenth through the twenty-first century. This course teaches students to identify tone, narration, form, theme, characterization, and other formal aspects of short fiction. Students are encouraged to formulate their own interpretation of the works read, based on their developing ability to recognize the decisions each author has made in constructing the text.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAN3600Multinational Buiness Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MGF1131Mathematics in Context

This course covers topics in personal finance, taxes, graph theory, gathering and organizing data, voting methods, and the use and mis-use of statistics. Two years of high school algebra is recommended. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
MMC4302Comparative and International Media Studies

Given the highly embedded nature of media and communications technologies in daily life, this course provides students with an opportunity to engage critically with concepts such as artificial intelligence, representation, fake news and disinformation, media regulation and media ethics. The course takes a comparative approach, with a focus on Europe and the US.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
PHM2300Introduction to Political Philosophy

This course introduces students to the main issues in political philosophy: the justification of political authority, role of law, political obligation, neocolonialism, disobedience, revolution, rights, the appropriate ends of government, patterns of distribution and justice.
3
POS4235Media and Politics

This course examines the role of the news media, both print and electronic, in shaping public opinion and voter behavior.
3
PSB2000Intro to Brain & Behavior

This course helps students understand basic nervous system mechanisms that underlie behavior and how systematic observation and experimentation are involved in constructing our understanding of these mechanisms. The course also conveys an appreciation for utilizing critical thinking and scientific knowledge when making important decisions. (Cannot be taken after PSB 3004C.)
3
RTV3101Writing for the Electronic Media

This course teaches non-fiction writing for recently evolved electronic media and fosters an understanding of the theory and practice of writing for those media. The course includes a graphics element and culminates in the production of the FSU Florence student magazine, ItaliaNoles.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3

*/**/***/****/^ Courses followed by these symbols denote cross listing. Students may take one or the other, but not both.

Money Matters

We understand financial considerations heavily influence study abroad decisions. The International Programs Financial Team hosts financial aid workshops and can answer financial aid questions during in-person advising appointments or via email: IP-FinancialAid@fsu.edu.

Program Fees

Instead of main campus tuition, participants pay an international program fee that typically includes instructional costs for a set number of IP credit hours, housing abroad during the program dates, international health insurance coverage, plus excursions & group activities. Each program fee is listed on the garnet Description tab of the program page, along with the specific expenses that are/are not included.

Payments

The program fee is split into two payments: a non-refundable ‘commitment fee’ followed by a second ‘full payment’ deadline to pay the remaining balance of the program fee. Check the garnet Dates & Docs tab of the program page for specific payment due dates. To make a payment, click here. Always review the cancellation & fee liability policy for your program before making a payment or deferment.

Financial Aid

Almost all sources of Financial aid (Florida Prepaid, Bright Futures, Loans, Grants, VA funding, Scholarships) are applicable toward program fees. Click the boxes below and review the IP Financial Aid Handbook to learn more about financial aid for studying abroad, including the fee deferment process that allows those receiving financial aid to delay paying a portion of their program fee until the beginning of their program, when most financial aid will have disbursed. A deferment does not reduce your balance owed, it only changes the due date.

For information about the 1098-T form, click here.



Florida Bright Futures

Florida Bright Futures scholarship funds may be used to help pay the program fee for every semester a student is abroad.

The Florida Department of Education website contains additional information concerning eligibility, renewal criteria, appeal processes and legislative updates.

Credit Hours Bright Futures Academic
$213.55 Per Credit Hour
Bright Futures Medallion
$160.16 Per Credit Hour
6 $1281.30 $960.96
7 $1494.85 $1121.12
8 $1708.40 $1281.28
9 $1921.95 $1441.44
10 $2135.50 $1601.60
11 $2349.05 $1761.76
12 $2562.60 $1921.92
13 $2776.15 $2082.08
14 $2989.70 $2242.24
15 $3203.25 $2402.40
16 $3416.80 $2562.56
17 $3630.35 $2722.72
18 $3843.90 $2882.88

Quick Links

Florida Prepaid

Florida Prepaid (FPP) tuition and local fees and/or dorm benefits may be used to pay International Programs fees.

To use a Florida Prepaid dorm account during the summer term, the purchaser of the Prepaid account must contact Florida Prepaid and complete the steps required to authorize use of the summer dorm plan for studying abroad. All other plans will be billed by FSU without additional authorization.

Contact Florida Prepaid directly at 1-800-552-4723 or access their requirements online at https://www.myfloridaprepaid.com/resources/forms/.

Note: Eligibility for summer financial aid requires enrollment in at least six credits.

How much is my Florida Prepaid worth if I study abroad?

# of Credits Enrolled FPP Tuition FPP Local Fees* Dorm Rate
1 $115.08 $34.73 $4050.00
2 $230.16 $69.46 Per Term**
3 $345.24 $104.19
4 $460.32 $138.92
5 $575.40 $173.65
6 $690.48 $208.38
7 $805.56 $243.11
8 $920.64 $277.84
9 $1035.72 $312.57
10 $1150.80 $347.30
11 $1265.88 $382.03
12 $1380.96 $416.76
13 $1496.04 $451.49
14 $1611.12 $486.22
15 $1726.20 $520.95
16 $1841.28 $555.68
17 $1956.36 $590.41
  • * Please note the above tuition and fees are subject to change at any time.
  • ** Contact FPP for authorization instructions to use dorm account during a summer term: 850-309-1660 ext. 4134

Quick Links

International Programs Scholarship Opportunities

International Programs strives to award an average of $200,000 in scholarships annually to about 100 students.

Current FSU students who have been admitted to an international program can apply to IP scholarships through the FS4U portal (link below). Before applying, students should review the list of available scholarship opportunities as well as the application process instructions.

Please note: IP scholarships are not available to in-state/out-of-state students currently on the First Year Abroad (FYA) program or First Semester Abroad (FSA) program or those who are directly enrolled at FSU Panama. Some scholarships may have additional eligibility criteria in addition to what is listed below. Please reference the Scholarship Application Instructions for complete details.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Program Start Date Scholarship Open Date Scholarship Application Deadline Scholarship Award Decisions Communicated to Applicants
Summer 2024 November 1, 2023 December 31, 2023 Prior to January 17, 2024
Fall 2024 January 10, 2024 April 24, 2024 Prior to May 22, 2024
Spring 2025 April 29, 2024 September 4, 2024 Prior to September 18, 2024

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

Other departments at FSU also offer their own study abroad scholarship opportunities. You can review the list of scholarships administered by other FSU departments by following the link below.

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

Other departments at FSU also offer their own study abroad scholarship opportunities. You can review the list of scholarships administered by other FSU departments by following the link below.

Other Scholarship Opportunities

Follow the link below for a general listing of  scholarships that may be available for international study. These scholarships are available to both FSU students and non-FSU students.

Related Materials

External Links

Study Abroad Loans

Additional Discount or Savings Opportunities

Multi-Term Discount

Students who have completed 15 or more credit hours on programs administered by the International Programs office, earning at least a 3.0 average or above in their course work at an international location(s), are eligible for a discount for subsequent IP program. The discount is $500 for summer session or $1,000 for fall or spring semester. Note: This discount is built into the program fees for First Year Abroad program students.

FSU Fees

Technology Fee (Not Included in Program Fees)

Florida State assesses a technology fee which is NOT included in the International Programs fee. The technology fee rate for 2021-2022 is assessed at $5.25 per credit hour for all students, regardless of location of study.

After registration, the student must pay the applicable technology fee; this fee is paid directly to Florida State University Student Business Services. Failure to pay this fee will result in a late payment charge being assessed to the student by Florida State University Student Business Services. International Programs has no control over the fee or any associated late payment penalty.

Facilities & Equipment Fees (Not Included in Program Fees)

International Programs fees do NOT include Facilities and Equipment Fees, which are assessed each semester for some majors (Medicine, Motion Pictures Arts, Music, Nursing, Fine Arts, Dance, Digital Media Production, etc.) even though you are studying overseas. If you are in one of these colleges/majors, you will be assessed a fee. Details can be found on the Registration Guide, under 'Fees and Financial Information.'

Financial Aid Info Sessions

The world is within your reach! Talk with a member of IP's Finances Team to learn how your financial aid can help you have a study abroad experience of a lifetime!

Join us for a virtual information session, register below! Or book an appointment with an IP Financial Aid representative, click here. For additional questions, contact us at IP-FinancialAid@fsu.edu. Be sure to follow us on social media @fsuip for updates.

  1. Wednesday, June 5, 2024 | 2:00 PM EST
    https://fsu.zoom.us/j/96584557889
  2. Friday, June 21, 2024 | 4:00 PM EST
    https://fsu.zoom.us/j/92205727895
  3. Monday, July 1, 2024 | 2:00 PM EST
    https://fsu.zoom.us/j/96750505653
  4. Friday, July 19, 2024 | 4:00 PM EST
    https://fsu.zoom.us/j/97618008590

Deferment Forms

The online fee deferment is located in the International Programs Student Portal under the Money Matters area. Login here to access the portal.

General Program Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

SUBMITTING CANCELLATION REQUESTS

Cancellation requests must be submitted by the applicant via email to IP-Cancel@fsu.edu. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the email subject line.

The day FSU International Programs receives the written cancellation request is considered the date of cancellation/withdrawal. Admitted International Program participants who cancel after a published payment due date will remain financially liable for program fees as described below.

FINANCIAL LIABILITY AFTER CANCELLATION

  • APPLICATION FEE: All International Programs applicants must pay a non-refundable, non-transferrable application fee before their application can be reviewed. Payment of the application fee does not guarantee admission. Application fee amounts vary by program.
  • COMMITMENT FEE: The Commitment Fee represents a financial commitment to participate in a specific International Program and is non-refundable after the Commitment Fee due date.
  • Admitted participants who fail to pay or defer the Commitment Fee by the published due date will be cancelled from their international program
  • Commitment Fee amounts vary by program and cannot be transferred between programs or semesters
  • REMAINING BALANCE: The balance of the program fee that remains after payment or deferment of the Commitment Fee is known as the remaining balance of program fees.
  • Participants who submit a cancellation request on or before the Full Payment Due Date will remain financially liable for the Commitment Fee previously paid or deferred
  • Failure to pay or defer the remaining balance of program fees by the published Full Payment Due Date will result in cancellation from the program
  • Participants who pay or defer the remaining balance of program fees but submit a cancellation request after the Full Payment Due Date will remain financially liable for the full program fee, including the Commitment Fee
  • DEFERRED FEES: Applicants who are confident they will receive financial aid or other assistance may financially commit to participate in an international program by submitting a legally binding fee deferment agreement to extend the due date for a portion of the Commitment Fee and/or the remaining balance of program fees.
  • International Programs must receive payment for all deferred fees on or before the 10th day of the program
  • Non-FSU students may not defer the Commitment Fee but may defer up to half of their remaining balance after payment of the Commitment Fee
  • Participants who request cancellation after submitting a legally binding fee deferment agreement will remain financially liable for the Commitment Fee or the full program fee, as determined by the timing of their cancellation request in relation to the published payment due dates as outlined above

REFUNDS / RELEASE OF LIABILITY FROM PROGRAM FEES

Refunds / release of liability cannot be granted in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun. In no instance is a refund or release of fee liability request considered if it is received after the end of the applicable program or semester, even if the cancellation or withdrawal occurred prior to the start of the program.

  • FULL REFUNDS of paid program fees (including the Commitment Fee) or a release of liability from deferred program fees will be granted for student cancellations prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances, upon submitting an appeal, accompanied by appropriate documentation:
  • Involuntary call to active duty
  • Death of the student or a death in the immediate family (parent or step-parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, sibling, or grandparent)
  • PARTIAL REFUNDS of paid program fees (NOT including the Commitment Fee) or a partial release of liability from deferred program fees may be granted for student cancellations prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances, upon submitting an appeal, accompanied by appropriate documentation:
  • Medical withdrawal: Illness of the student of such a duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by FSU’s University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  • Exceptional unforeseen circumstances beyond the control of the student with appropriate documentation, as approved by the International Programs refund committee.

APPEAL PROCESS FOR PARTIAL REFUNDS / RELEASE OF LIABILITY

Participants must submit appeal requests and appropriate documentation to the International Programs Refund Committee (IP-Cancel@fsu.edu). Last name and program code should be included in the email subject line. Submission of an appeal does not guarantee a partial refund or release of fee liability will be approved by the International Programs Refund Committee.

When evaluating appeals, the Refund Committee considers the timeliness of the cancellation request in relation to the event causing the need for withdrawal and in relation to the program start date. Should the Refund Committee approve an appeal on the basis of medical withdrawal or exceptional unforeseen circumstances, participants may receive a partial refund / partial release of fee liability as determined by their cancellation date in the chart below:


If Cancellation Date is…
Participant's Financial Liability if
appeal is approved by IP Refund
Committee
Max amount of refund / release of
financial liability if appeal is
approved by IP Refund Committee
60 days or more before
program start date
Commitment Fee + 25% of remaining
program fee balance
75% of program fee balance after the
commitment fee
59-31 days before
program start date
Commitment Fee + 50% of remaining
program fee balance
50% of program fee balance after the
commitment fee
30 days or less before
program start date
Commitment Fee + 75% of remaining
program fee balance
25% of program fee balance after the
commitment fee
On or after program
start date
Liable for full program fee No refund/release of financial
liability

REFUNDS/RELEASE OF LIABILITY OF PROGRAM FEES WHEN IP CANCELS A PROGRAM

Refunds of program fees/release of liability for program fees will be granted when International Programs cancels a program prior to the beginning of the applicable term.

If FSU International Programs cancels an International Program after the program start date (or after the start of domestic or online coursework prior to the study abroad component of Spring Break/short-term programs) due to causes beyond the control of FSU International Programs, including, but not limited to, acts of God; natural disasters; riots; war; epidemics; terrorist activities; government restrictions; failure of suppliers, subcontractors, or carriers; or travel warnings or prohibitions issued by the World Health Organization or any U.S. federal government agency, including the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Department of State, no refunds of any kind will be issued. However, FSU International Programs, in its sole discretion, may issue refunds for unused program costs such as housing.

Spring 2019 General Program Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

Application Fee

The $100 application fee is nonrefundable.

Confirmation Deposit

The $1500 confirmation deposit is refundable until the close of business on the deposit’s due date. If an applicant has paid the deposit or been granted a deferred payment plan for the deposit and has not withdrawn from a program as of the close of business on the deposit due date, the applicant becomes fully liable for the confirmation deposit. Students whose offer of admission to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) will not be able to participate but remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit.

Full Program Fee

Program applicants who have demonstrated their intent to participate in the program by payment or by deferral of the confirmation deposit and who have not withdrawn from the program as of the full payment due date become fully liable for the full program fee as of the close of business on the full payment due date.

Refunds of Program Fees

Refunds of program fees WILL BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Cancellation of program by International Programs
  2. Involuntary call to active duty
  3. Death of the student or death in the immediate family (parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, or sibling)

Refunds of program fees will not be granted where a student becomes ineligible to participate in a program for failure to meet or maintain admission requirements.

Partial Refunds of Program Fees

Partial refunds of program fees MAY BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Illness of the student of such duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by Florida State's University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  2. Exceptional circumstances that could not have been foreseen and were beyond the control of the student, as approved by the International Programs’ refund committee.
    • Timely notification in relation to the event that caused the need for withdrawal will be considered in evaluating refund requests. In no instance will a request be considered if it is made after the end of the semester for which the refund is requested.
    • Refunds cannot be granted, under any circumstances, in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun.
    • Applicants who apply and are accepted after the published due dates remain liable for fees in accordance with the published due dates.
  3. Rescission of admission by the Florida State University Office of Admission for failure to meet the conditions of one’s admission. Students whose admission offer to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit

Submitting Withdrawals, Requests for Refunds, and Release from Fee Liability

All withdrawals, requests for refunds, and requests for release from fee liability must be submitted in writing via email to International Programs. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the subject line of the email.

Alternatively, requests can be submitted in writing to International Programs at the following postal address:

Attention: Refund Committee
Office of FSU International Programs
A5500 University Center
282 Champions Way
P.O. Box 3062420
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420

Visa Information

Italy

A visa is required for US citizens participating in a study abroad program longer than 90 days in Italy. Pursuant to Italian legal requirements, students interested in studying in Italy must be at least 18 years of age by the start of the program. Contact IP-Info@fsu.edu for more information.


Programs Under 90 Days:

US citizens participating in a study abroad program in Italy over the summer will not need to apply for a visa as all summer programs are under 90 days, however, you may be required to register with the European Travel Information Authorization System (ETIAS). More information regarding the ETIAS registration process and timeline will be provided upon admittance to your program. Please keep the following immigration requirements in mind:

  • Passport Validity: Participants must hold a passport valid for at least six months beyond their intended departure from Italy containing at least two empty visa pages. For more information regarding passports, please visit Passports on our website.
  • Travel Restrictions: U.S. citizens are permitted to travel up to 90 within 180 days in Italy and the Schengen Area. If you plan to travel before or after your program, please ensure that you will not be in Italy or the Schengen Area longer than 90 days.
  • Non-U.S. & Dual Citizens: Immigration requirements for non-U.S. citizens may be different than those of U.S. citizens. Please be advised that you will need to be in possession of your Permanent Resident Card, or U.S. visa, to allow re-entry into the United States following your program. If you are a non-U.S. citizen or hold dual-citizenship status, please contact IP-Visas@fsu.edu.
  • Current Residence: If you currently reside outside of the United States, please contact an Immigration Coordinator at IP-Visas@fsu.edu.

Programs Over 90 Days:

Students participating in Fall, Spring, or First Year Abroad programs in Italy will be required to obtain a visa. A number of documents will need to be submitted in order for International Programs to apply for the visa on your behalf. Further information regarding visa applications and requirements will be provided in a program-specific Visa Packet. Please take note of the following important visa requirements:

  • Passport Validity: Participants must hold a passport valid for at least six months beyond their intended departure from Italy containing at least two empty visa pages. For more information regarding passports, please visit Passports on our website.
  • Financial Support: The Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs require those applying for a semester-long student visa to have proof of financial support in the amount of $4,000, and year-long students to provide proof of financial support in the amount of $12,000. This must be in the form of an original recent bank statement (checking/savings only) or a notarized letter from the bank for an account either in the student’s or parent(s)’/guardian(s)’ names.
  • Travel Restrictions: You should not arrange any international travel in the 3 months leading up to your program. The Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs highly discourages students from attempting to enter the Schengen Area before the start of their visa and will be in possession of participants’ passports for processing prior to the start of the program.
  • Non U.S. & Dual Citizens: Immigration requirements for non-U.S. citizens may be different than those of U.S. citizens. Please be advised that you will need to be in possession of your Permanent Resident Card, or U.S. visa, to allow re-entry into the United States following your program. If you are a non-U.S. citizen or hold dual-citizenship status, please contact IP-Visas@fsu.edu.
  • Current Residence: If you currently reside outside of the United States, please contact an Immigration Coordinator at IP-Visas@fsu.edu.


Important Dates & Documents

Summer 2024
Applications Open*Wednesday, October 04, 2023 $100.00
Scholarship Applications DueSunday, December 31, 2023
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, January 17, 2024$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, February 14, 2024

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

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Fall 2024
Applications Open*Wednesday, December 06, 2023 $100.00
Scholarship Applications DueWednesday, April 24, 2024
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, May 22, 2024$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, June 26, 2024

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

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Spring 2025
Applications Open*Wednesday, April 03, 2024 $100.00
Scholarship Applications DueWednesday, September 04, 2024
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, September 18, 2024$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, October 16, 2024

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

***

Documents

Health & Safety

For 60 years, Florida State University International Programs has been committed to providing a rewarding academic and cultural experience that enriches the lives of our students. Our highest priority is and always has been the welfare and security of our students.

Program directors maintain contact with our Tallahassee office, local authorities, and United States officials, both at home and abroad. Each program holds meetings with students in which safety procedures and precautions are detailed and regularly re-emphasized. Each program has an Emergency Plan which includes details about local health care facilities, meeting points and procedures, and contingency plans and funds should it ever become necessary to evacuate our students.

Students are reminded to inform International Programs of the details of their independent travel details via our online travel form, heed US State Department travel advisories, and take relevant emergency and US Embassy/Consulate contact information with them.

Students venture abroad to experience other cultures, and to gain a deeper appreciation of their role as American citizens in the world. FSU International Programs is fully committed to helping students realize these aspirations in a safe and secure learning environment.

Insurance

International Programs Insurance

All International Programs fees include international medical and evacuation insurance coverage through Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI). A link to our policy is provided below. The coverage will be effective for participants from the day the program starts until the day the program ends. Please note: this policy is NOT intended to replace your domestic coverage. For more information, visit studentinsurance.fsu.edu.

Travel Insurance Information

FSU International Programs encourages program participants to consider purchasing travel insurance. Travel insurance comes in many forms and can protect you in case you need to change your travel plans due to unforeseen circumstances. The coverage ranges from help with lost baggage to delay in flight plans to trip cancellation.

Travel insurance that covers fees associated with changing your airfare plans is especially helpful for those attending programs that require entry or student visas. Immigration approval can take months with regulations changing often that can cause the need to delay or cancel flight plans. Often airfare arrangements are non-refundable or cannot be changed without fee penalties. Certain types of trip cancellation insurance will reimburse you the cost of your airfare or penalty fees. Travel Insurance must cover failure to obtain visa.

You may wish to begin researching travel insurance and trip cancellation policies by using the Travel Insurance Review website. Their Travel Insurance 101: The Complete Guide to Travel Insurance section is particularly helpful for those just beginning their research. They also have a section that allows you to compare different policies.

Travel insurance is also offered through CISI and Travel Insured International. Please note that this plan must be purchased within 21 days of paying your first fee. For example, if looking to insure the cost of the program, the plan must be purchased within 21 days of paying the commitment fee to International Programs. If wishing to insure only the cost of the flight, the plan must be purchased within 21 days of purchasing airfare.

Travel Resources

University Policies & Resources

Clery Act

In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Florida State University study center safety guides include institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, and other matters. The report also contains statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain off campus buildings or property owned or controlled by The Florida State University; and on public property within or immediately adjacent and accessible from the campus. A paper copy is available upon request to FSU International Programs at A5500 University Center, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420, or by contacting FSU International Programs at (850) 644-3272 or (800) 374-8581.

Copies are also available from the study center administrative offices, or you may download from the links below: