Broad Curriculum Program | London, England

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The FSU London broad curriculum program provides you the opportunity to take courses within a variety of academic disciplines while simultaneously immersing yourself in the society and culture of the United Kingdom. The program offers a unique way of learning with included academic excursions to museums, galleries, theatres, palaces, walking tours, street art, and much more  as integral elements of class sessions.

You’ll have the opportunity to experience the cultural richness of Great Britain through organized group excursions – which are included in your program fee – often to places overlooked by tourists. Past excursions have included trips to vibrant cities across the UK and explorations of the beautiful British countryside, such as an overnight trip to Edinburgh or Liverpool, a trip to Stonehenge, a visit to Windsor Castle, or a chance to explore the Tower of London or St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. Opportunities for personal travel are provided throughout the program as well, giving you the freedom to explore on your own. 

Program Description

Program Sessions

Do not purchase airline tickets until advised to do so by International Programs.

CodeTermStart DateEnd DateFeeApply
LN07Summer 202405/08/2407/04/24$13,190.00Closed
LN12Summer 202405/08/2408/04/24$16,975.00Closed
LN08Summer 202406/07/2408/04/24$13,190.00Closed
LN02Summer 202406/07/2407/04/24$7,170.00Closed
LN03Summer 202407/08/2408/04/24$7,170.00Closed
LN04Fall 202408/28/2412/12/24$16,975.00
LN05Spring 202501/09/2504/24/25$16,975.00

Eligibility

This program is open to all interested students.

Study Center

FSU London is housed in the heart of the historic Bloomsbury neighborhood which is itself positioned in the very center of London within walking distance of a variety of historic and cultural sites such as Trafalgar Square, the Houses of Parliament, the British Museum and the West End Theatre District. With housing, classrooms, offices, laundry, computer labs, a library and controlled access, our seventeenth-century Great Russell Street premises combine rich history with contemporary technology while onsite staff and security provide 24/7 pastoral care. 

Click here to learn more about FSU London

Housing

Housing for these programs is in shared apartments in central London either in, or within walking distance of, the study center. Amenities include fully equipped kitchens, furnished living areas, Wi-Fi, cable TV, and a weekly cleaning service with a change of bed linens and towels. Short walks and easy access to city buses and the London Underground allows students to explore this fascinating city safely and with ease.

Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. For a list of hotels near the campus, please click here.

Excursions & Group Activities

While group activities and excursions vary per session and may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities, typical excursions may include:

  • Overnight Excursions

    Bath and Stonehenge, Bruges and Flanders, The Lake District, Yorkshire, Cornwall

  • Day Excursions

    Harry Potter Studios, Hampton Court Palace, Cambridge, Oxford, Brighton, Blenheim Palace

  • London Excursions

    Tower of London, Kew Palace and Gardens, St. Paul’s Cathedral, Greenwich, Kensington Palace, West End and Off West End Theatre Performances

  • Class Excursions

    British Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Tate Modern, Churchill War Rooms, Victoria & Albert Museum, Natural History Museum, Charles Dickens' House, Hyde Park, Houses of Parliament, Old Bailey, Harrods, Museum of London, Bank of England, Royal Albert Hall, Abbey Road, Sherlock Holmes Museum, Wellcome Collection

  • Other Activities

    Guided coach and walking tours of London, movie nights, pub quizzes, Thanksgiving Day meal (Fall only), Afternoon Tea (Spring only)

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • Instructional costs for classes offered by International Programs:
      * Fall/Spring: up to 17 credit hours
      * Summer: 3 credit hours during each 4-week session
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Weekly Breakfast Boxes
  • Monthly group restaurant meals
  • Meal vouchers
     * Fall and Spring: £150 worth of meal vouchers per semester
     * Summer: £40 worth of meal vouchers per each 4-week session
  • Program-planned half-day and full-day excursions within London and around the UK
  • Program-planned weekend trips within the UK
  • Program-planned group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • Health insurance
  • London transport pass
  • On-site administrative & pastoral support
  • IP welcome gift

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted on program calendar)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., per credit hour technology fee)
  • Course-related fees (e.g., theatre tickets)

Courses

To speak with the International Programs Academic Advisor about study abroad courses, you can visit our zoom drop-in advising hours on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 10:00am-12:00pm. There are also appointments available via Campus Connect on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. If these times do not work for you, contact our advisor directly at IP-AcademicAdvising@fsu.edu to make an appointment.

IP provides CoreFSU requirement areas to help students make informed decisions. Although every attempt is made to be accurate & current, these designations can be fluid and it is the student’s responsibility to confirm all CoreFSU requirement areas through the CoreFSU Course Search Tool and your major advisor.

London Study Centre Minor

The London Study Centre Minor enhances and focuses a student’s program in Britain. It requires 15 credits, 9 of which must be earned in London and include a cultural component. Students can choose from various disciplinary perspectives on British  Studies. A maximum of 9 hours may be counted in a single academic discipline. A minimum grade of “C-“ must be earned and a minimum grade point average of 2.0 must be maintained for all courses taken for the minor.
Contact IP-AcademicAdvisor@fsu.edu for more information. 

Session LN02Summer 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics*

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
CPO3930Special Topics: Comparative Government and Politics*

Human history is marked by the constant struggle to define the power of the State relative to individual. This course will explore the tension between State power and individual liberty in a comparative context. Students will immerse themselves in London’s political context visiting notable sites that include: The British Library to examine the Magna Carta, The Tate Modern to explore politics and rebellion in art, The Tower of London to consider abuses of state power, The Houses of Lords and Commons to understand representative institutions, a Tour of White Chapel to explore the impact of immigration and global economies on identity, and The Imperial War Museum to examine state conflict with other states.
3
FIL2001Intro to Cinema Studies

This course introduces students to film analysis theories and techniques, including the basics of dramatic structure, genre, prevalent filmmaking theories, and film production processes. Through weekly film screenings, class discussion, and hands-on production exercises, students develop and practice skills to help them compare and interpret films representing a variety of genres, aesthetic traditions, and cultural contexts.
3
HUM2742Walking in London

This course explores mobility in the big city through the eyes and ears of the flâneur who saunters aimlessly and leisurely as he or she observes scenes in the big city. We will investigate the political, aesthetic, sociological, and historical meaning of walking in London by reading influential works from a range of disciplines—as well as by doing it. The course will combine theory with practice: students will learn how the term flâneur or “man about town” became shorthand for modernist notions of leisure, spectacle, and elite urban experience across a range of disciplines, from literary studies and art history to urban studies and media theory. Using tools of keen observation, critical awareness, and discussion to think about how, where, and why we walk, students will develop a keener sense of the changing meanings of mobility; of the treatment of national identity, gender, class, and race in relation to urban mobility and sense of place; and of sensory interactions with the social or built environment.
3
HUM4931British Life & Culture

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
THE3061Introduction to Theatre in London

This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Center. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3
Session LN03Summer 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
BUL3310The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

This course offers an introduction to the legal setting in which business operates. Emphasis is on public and regulatory law and on the social, political, and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Subjects include the nature of law and legal process, administrative law, business and the Constitution, statutory and common law, and related topics.
3
ENG3931Black British Media and Culture

This course is an interactive engagement with Black British media and culture. We will consider how it has impacted and transformed mainstream British culture from the Windrush generation to our contemporary moment by taking advantage of London as our classroom. Keep your Oyster card topped up — we’ll be visiting Brixton, the Tate Modern, and the Museum of the Docklands as well as many other places. Not only will we read canonical Black British texts such as Samuel Selvon’s The Lonely Londoners and Zadie’s Smith’s White Teeth, but also we will watch contemporary Black British television and sample the Afro-Caribbean dishes reshaping British cuisine. Through fiction, poetry, museum spaces, street life, food, fashion, and music, students will engage the full landscape of London through the lens of the African Diaspora.
3
IND2219Design & the Human Experience

Course is approved for Liberal Studies and meets the Humanities and Cultural Practice FSU requirement. This course focuses on the impact of design on the human experience. It is a gateway experience in which students will explore the nature of design, creativity, and problem solving. The course will introduce some of the major theories from the design disciplines of interiors, architecture, landscape architecture, and products design, and provide students with an awareness, understanding, and enthusiasm for design and its impact on our lives.
3
MAN4301Human Resource Management

This course is a survey of the human resource management function in organizations. Topics include: selection, recruiting, training, compensation, and performance appraisal.
3
URP4936Special Topics in Urban and Regional Planning: The UK: Historical Approaches, Unique Solutions, and Modern Challenges

This course will introduce students to urban planning and urban form through a specific focus on the history and evolution of planning in London and the United Kingdom. Students will examine the unique histories and 21st century evolution of London and UK urban and regional planning and design, with a particular focus on their historical and modern built, aesthetic, land use, environmental, political- economic and sustainable/resilient design approaches and goals. The City of London, along with aeras outside London and in the UK, will used as a teaching laboratory to explore these concepts, and most (if not all) class periods will be spent out in London or nearby observing urban phenomena firsthand. Students will be introduced to a variety of urban planning sub-fields including urban design, environmental planning, sustainability and resilience planning, collaborative decision-making and transportation planning, but with an exploration of how these fields have played out historically and are playing out today in the great city of London and the UK.
3
Session LN07: Summer 2024
Students must choose one class from LN01 and one class from LN02
Session LN02Summer 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics*

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
CPO3930Special Topics: Comparative Government and Politics*

Human history is marked by the constant struggle to define the power of the State relative to individual. This course will explore the tension between State power and individual liberty in a comparative context. Students will immerse themselves in London’s political context visiting notable sites that include: The British Library to examine the Magna Carta, The Tate Modern to explore politics and rebellion in art, The Tower of London to consider abuses of state power, The Houses of Lords and Commons to understand representative institutions, a Tour of White Chapel to explore the impact of immigration and global economies on identity, and The Imperial War Museum to examine state conflict with other states.
3
FIL2001Intro to Cinema Studies

This course introduces students to film analysis theories and techniques, including the basics of dramatic structure, genre, prevalent filmmaking theories, and film production processes. Through weekly film screenings, class discussion, and hands-on production exercises, students develop and practice skills to help them compare and interpret films representing a variety of genres, aesthetic traditions, and cultural contexts.
3
HUM2742Walking in London

This course explores mobility in the big city through the eyes and ears of the flâneur who saunters aimlessly and leisurely as he or she observes scenes in the big city. We will investigate the political, aesthetic, sociological, and historical meaning of walking in London by reading influential works from a range of disciplines—as well as by doing it. The course will combine theory with practice: students will learn how the term flâneur or “man about town” became shorthand for modernist notions of leisure, spectacle, and elite urban experience across a range of disciplines, from literary studies and art history to urban studies and media theory. Using tools of keen observation, critical awareness, and discussion to think about how, where, and why we walk, students will develop a keener sense of the changing meanings of mobility; of the treatment of national identity, gender, class, and race in relation to urban mobility and sense of place; and of sensory interactions with the social or built environment.
3
HUM4931British Life & Culture

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
THE3061Introduction to Theatre in London

This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Center. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3
Session LN08: Summer 2024
Students must choose one class from LN02 and one class from LN03
Session LN02Summer 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics*

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
CPO3930Special Topics: Comparative Government and Politics*

Human history is marked by the constant struggle to define the power of the State relative to individual. This course will explore the tension between State power and individual liberty in a comparative context. Students will immerse themselves in London’s political context visiting notable sites that include: The British Library to examine the Magna Carta, The Tate Modern to explore politics and rebellion in art, The Tower of London to consider abuses of state power, The Houses of Lords and Commons to understand representative institutions, a Tour of White Chapel to explore the impact of immigration and global economies on identity, and The Imperial War Museum to examine state conflict with other states.
3
FIL2001Intro to Cinema Studies

This course introduces students to film analysis theories and techniques, including the basics of dramatic structure, genre, prevalent filmmaking theories, and film production processes. Through weekly film screenings, class discussion, and hands-on production exercises, students develop and practice skills to help them compare and interpret films representing a variety of genres, aesthetic traditions, and cultural contexts.
3
HUM2742Walking in London

This course explores mobility in the big city through the eyes and ears of the flâneur who saunters aimlessly and leisurely as he or she observes scenes in the big city. We will investigate the political, aesthetic, sociological, and historical meaning of walking in London by reading influential works from a range of disciplines—as well as by doing it. The course will combine theory with practice: students will learn how the term flâneur or “man about town” became shorthand for modernist notions of leisure, spectacle, and elite urban experience across a range of disciplines, from literary studies and art history to urban studies and media theory. Using tools of keen observation, critical awareness, and discussion to think about how, where, and why we walk, students will develop a keener sense of the changing meanings of mobility; of the treatment of national identity, gender, class, and race in relation to urban mobility and sense of place; and of sensory interactions with the social or built environment.
3
HUM4931British Life & Culture

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
THE3061Introduction to Theatre in London

This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Center. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3
Session LN03Summer 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
BUL3310The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

This course offers an introduction to the legal setting in which business operates. Emphasis is on public and regulatory law and on the social, political, and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Subjects include the nature of law and legal process, administrative law, business and the Constitution, statutory and common law, and related topics.
3
ENG3931Black British Media and Culture

This course is an interactive engagement with Black British media and culture. We will consider how it has impacted and transformed mainstream British culture from the Windrush generation to our contemporary moment by taking advantage of London as our classroom. Keep your Oyster card topped up — we’ll be visiting Brixton, the Tate Modern, and the Museum of the Docklands as well as many other places. Not only will we read canonical Black British texts such as Samuel Selvon’s The Lonely Londoners and Zadie’s Smith’s White Teeth, but also we will watch contemporary Black British television and sample the Afro-Caribbean dishes reshaping British cuisine. Through fiction, poetry, museum spaces, street life, food, fashion, and music, students will engage the full landscape of London through the lens of the African Diaspora.
3
IND2219Design & the Human Experience

Course is approved for Liberal Studies and meets the Humanities and Cultural Practice FSU requirement. This course focuses on the impact of design on the human experience. It is a gateway experience in which students will explore the nature of design, creativity, and problem solving. The course will introduce some of the major theories from the design disciplines of interiors, architecture, landscape architecture, and products design, and provide students with an awareness, understanding, and enthusiasm for design and its impact on our lives.
3
MAN4301Human Resource Management

This course is a survey of the human resource management function in organizations. Topics include: selection, recruiting, training, compensation, and performance appraisal.
3
URP4936Special Topics in Urban and Regional Planning: The UK: Historical Approaches, Unique Solutions, and Modern Challenges

This course will introduce students to urban planning and urban form through a specific focus on the history and evolution of planning in London and the United Kingdom. Students will examine the unique histories and 21st century evolution of London and UK urban and regional planning and design, with a particular focus on their historical and modern built, aesthetic, land use, environmental, political- economic and sustainable/resilient design approaches and goals. The City of London, along with aeras outside London and in the UK, will used as a teaching laboratory to explore these concepts, and most (if not all) class periods will be spent out in London or nearby observing urban phenomena firsthand. Students will be introduced to a variety of urban planning sub-fields including urban design, environmental planning, sustainability and resilience planning, collaborative decision-making and transportation planning, but with an exploration of how these fields have played out historically and are playing out today in the great city of London and the UK.
3
Session LN12: Summer 2024
Students must choose at least one class from LN01, one class from LN02, and one class from LN03
Session LN02Summer 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics*

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
CPO3930Special Topics: Comparative Government and Politics*

Human history is marked by the constant struggle to define the power of the State relative to individual. This course will explore the tension between State power and individual liberty in a comparative context. Students will immerse themselves in London’s political context visiting notable sites that include: The British Library to examine the Magna Carta, The Tate Modern to explore politics and rebellion in art, The Tower of London to consider abuses of state power, The Houses of Lords and Commons to understand representative institutions, a Tour of White Chapel to explore the impact of immigration and global economies on identity, and The Imperial War Museum to examine state conflict with other states.
3
FIL2001Intro to Cinema Studies

This course introduces students to film analysis theories and techniques, including the basics of dramatic structure, genre, prevalent filmmaking theories, and film production processes. Through weekly film screenings, class discussion, and hands-on production exercises, students develop and practice skills to help them compare and interpret films representing a variety of genres, aesthetic traditions, and cultural contexts.
3
HUM2742Walking in London

This course explores mobility in the big city through the eyes and ears of the flâneur who saunters aimlessly and leisurely as he or she observes scenes in the big city. We will investigate the political, aesthetic, sociological, and historical meaning of walking in London by reading influential works from a range of disciplines—as well as by doing it. The course will combine theory with practice: students will learn how the term flâneur or “man about town” became shorthand for modernist notions of leisure, spectacle, and elite urban experience across a range of disciplines, from literary studies and art history to urban studies and media theory. Using tools of keen observation, critical awareness, and discussion to think about how, where, and why we walk, students will develop a keener sense of the changing meanings of mobility; of the treatment of national identity, gender, class, and race in relation to urban mobility and sense of place; and of sensory interactions with the social or built environment.
3
HUM4931British Life & Culture

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
THE3061Introduction to Theatre in London

This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Center. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3
Session LN03Summer 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
BUL3310The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

This course offers an introduction to the legal setting in which business operates. Emphasis is on public and regulatory law and on the social, political, and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Subjects include the nature of law and legal process, administrative law, business and the Constitution, statutory and common law, and related topics.
3
ENG3931Black British Media and Culture

This course is an interactive engagement with Black British media and culture. We will consider how it has impacted and transformed mainstream British culture from the Windrush generation to our contemporary moment by taking advantage of London as our classroom. Keep your Oyster card topped up — we’ll be visiting Brixton, the Tate Modern, and the Museum of the Docklands as well as many other places. Not only will we read canonical Black British texts such as Samuel Selvon’s The Lonely Londoners and Zadie’s Smith’s White Teeth, but also we will watch contemporary Black British television and sample the Afro-Caribbean dishes reshaping British cuisine. Through fiction, poetry, museum spaces, street life, food, fashion, and music, students will engage the full landscape of London through the lens of the African Diaspora.
3
IND2219Design & the Human Experience

Course is approved for Liberal Studies and meets the Humanities and Cultural Practice FSU requirement. This course focuses on the impact of design on the human experience. It is a gateway experience in which students will explore the nature of design, creativity, and problem solving. The course will introduce some of the major theories from the design disciplines of interiors, architecture, landscape architecture, and products design, and provide students with an awareness, understanding, and enthusiasm for design and its impact on our lives.
3
MAN4301Human Resource Management

This course is a survey of the human resource management function in organizations. Topics include: selection, recruiting, training, compensation, and performance appraisal.
3
URP4936Special Topics in Urban and Regional Planning: The UK: Historical Approaches, Unique Solutions, and Modern Challenges

This course will introduce students to urban planning and urban form through a specific focus on the history and evolution of planning in London and the United Kingdom. Students will examine the unique histories and 21st century evolution of London and UK urban and regional planning and design, with a particular focus on their historical and modern built, aesthetic, land use, environmental, political- economic and sustainable/resilient design approaches and goals. The City of London, along with aeras outside London and in the UK, will used as a teaching laboratory to explore these concepts, and most (if not all) class periods will be spent out in London or nearby observing urban phenomena firsthand. Students will be introduced to a variety of urban planning sub-fields including urban design, environmental planning, sustainability and resilience planning, collaborative decision-making and transportation planning, but with an exploration of how these fields have played out historically and are playing out today in the great city of London and the UK.
3
Session LN04Fall 2024
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology

This course is an introduction to modern anthropological archaeology. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary scientific approaches employed in contemporary archaeological research and provides students with an overview of the origins and evolution of human social and economic systems.
3
ANT2100LIntroduction to Archaeology Lab

The course is conducted as a hands-on laboratory in archaeological methodology. Each week, students have a series of laboratory exercises designed to teach specific analytical techniques, including paleozoological analysis, paleobotanical analysis, geophysical prospecting techniques, and GIS.
1
ARH2000Art, Architecture and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
BSC1005General Biology for Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology Lab for Non-Majors

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CPO3123Comparative Government & Politics: Great Britain

This course examines the political and governmental system of Great Britain within a comparative framework. Comparison and contrast with the United States emphasized.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course stresses the importance of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, as well as the importance of using writing as a recursive process involving invention, drafting, collaboration, revision, rereading, and editing to clearly and effectively communicate ideas for specific purposes, occasions, and audiences. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
ENL3334Introduction to Shakespeare

This course is an introduction to the study of Shakespeare at the college level. Consideration of representative works of comedy, history, tragedy, tragic-comedy drawn from throughout the playwright's career.
3
EUH320519th-Century Europe

This course is an introduction to key themes and problems in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Although this is an upper-level course, no prior background in European history is required.
3
HIS4930Tudor England

In this course we will discover Tudor England through contemporary sources, in words, images, music, cultural objects and buildings. It proceeds topically, within a chronological framework. Looming over every aspect of Tudor history is that cataclysmic event of 16th-century Europe, the Protestant Reformation. We shall be investigating the transformation of England from a stronghold of medieval piety to one of Protestant fervor, and how that religious change affected society and politics. Each class session will consist both of lecture and discussion and of activities such as walks and museum visits.
3
HUM4931Topics in the Civ. of Britain: British Life & Culture

This course offers students a practical understanding of contemporary Britain in order to enrich their time spent living and studying abroad. It is an interdisciplinary course that fuses history, sociology and media studies to explain the events and trends that have shaped modern Britain and the lives of its varied citizens. It encourages students to draw on their academic knowledge and life experiences of the United States in order to compare British and American life in the modern era - the differences, similarities and cross-influences between the two nations. Ultimately, this course aims to provide the student with a fresh and lasting perspective on contemporary America through a better understanding of the country with which it reputedly has a ‘Special Relationship’. Costs: Students should maintain a topped-up Oyster Card and allow up to £30 for additional class fees.
3
IDS2060Global Engagement (Online)

This course gives students the opportunity to study a different country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with their own through actively participating in cultural experiences.
1
IDS3435Please Please Me: Anglo-American Youth Culture from the 1950s to the Present

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
INR4083International Conflict

This course examines historical patterns in warfare, and considers the conditions that influence war and peace between nation-states. Topics include causes of war, outcomes and aftermath of war, and approaches to peace.
3
LIT3383Women in Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1140Pre-Calculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2311Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MGF1130Mathematical Thinking

In this course, students utilize multiple means of problem solving through student-centered mathematical exploration. The course is designed to teach students to think more effectively and vastly increase their problem-solving ability through practical application and divergent thinking. This course is appropriate for students in a wide range of disciplines/programs. Completion of two years of high school algebra is recommended prior to taking this course.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
PHI2010Intro to Philosophy

This course introduces some of the central problems in philosophy. Students also learn how to construct and criticize arguments and develop their own philosophical positions.
3
PSY2012General Psychology

This course is a broad overview covering important psychological principles and findings within the major subfields of psychology, and the basic scientific methods employed. A "bio-psycho-social" approach is emphasized throughout so that all behaviors (including how we think, feel, and act) are discussed in terms of biological, psychological, and social determinants and consequences.
3
REL1300Introduction to World Religions

This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
THE2000Introduction to Theatre*

This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.
3
THE3061Introduction to Theatre in London*

This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Center. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3
Session LN05Spring 2025
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
BSC1005General Biology for Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology for Non-Majors Laboratory

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics (Online)

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CHM1046General Chemistry II

This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
3
CHM1046LGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
1
CLA2010Peoples of the Roman World

This introductory level course engages with the Roman world from the point of view of the people who lived there. Students study the different kinds of people who inhabited the Roman Empire, focusing on its multiethnic and diverse populaces, and on the ways in which, as in a modern city, rather different groups may have come into contact with one another.
3
CPO3123Comparative Government and Politics: Great Britain

This course examines the political and governmental system of Great Britain within a comparative framework. Comparison and contrast with the United States emphasized.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
ENC3416Writing and Editing in Print and Online

This course focuses on the principles of composing, especially across different composing spaces. Students create works in several different media, including (1) in print, (2) on the screen, and (3) for the network, while also learning how to edit the works deployed in each medium appropriately. In addition, students repurpose at least one of these works for another medium. Students conclude the course by creating a digital portfolio.
3
ENG3114Film Adaptation

In this course, students study classic and contemporary theories of film adaptation, borrowing as well as breaking from the concept of fidelity to create a space to explore how the cinema engages with literature, and how literary stories are deformed and reformed through the medium of film.
3
ENL2022British Authors

This course is a survey of English masterworks intended for students in liberal studies and those exploring a literature major. Among the authors typically considered are Wordsworth, Dickens, and Conrad.
3
EUH320620th-Century Europe

This course covers European history from the turn of the century through the two world wars. Particular attention is paid to the major powers in this period when Europe declined from its preeminent position.
3
HIS4930History of London

This course examines the history of London from its Roman origins through the 20th century. It combines analysis and discussion of a wide variety of primary sources and maps with field work in the form of guided urban walks. Students will learn how to ‘read’ the clues to London’s historical development in the modern cityscape and then apply their understanding and skills in project assignments, such as each exploring and analysing a different neighbourhood of the medieval city. This course examines the history of London from its Roman origins through the 20th century. It combines analysis and discussion of a wide variety of primary sources and maps with field work in the form of guided urban walks. Students will learn how to ‘read’ the clues to London’s historical development in the modern cityscape and then apply their understanding and skills in project assignments, such as each exploring and analysing a different neighbourhood of the medieval city.
3
HUM3123Irish Culture

This course introduces students to the rich traditions and culture of Ireland. The course acquaints students with the cultural factors that have shaped Ireland in general and Dublin in particular.
3
HUM4931British Life & Culture

This course offers students a practical understanding of contemporary Britain in order to enrich their time spent living and studying abroad. It is an interdisciplinary course that fuses history, sociology and media studies to explain the events and trends that have shaped modern Britain and the lives of its varied citizens. It encourages students to draw on their academic knowledge and life experiences of the United States in order to compare British and American life in the modern era - the differences, similarities and cross-influences between the two nations. Ultimately, this course aims to provide the student with a fresh and lasting perspective on contemporary America through a better understanding of the country with which it reputedly has a ‘Special Relationship’.
3
HUN1201The Science of Nutrition

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
IDS2322Sexual Health in the Modern World

This course analyzes and synthesizes information centering on a number of current sexual and reproductive health issues. Course materials include the interdisciplinary theorizing of feminists, medical social scientists, anthropologists, demographers, and public health scholars. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.
3
IDS3326Understanding Religion; Understanding People

This course introduces students to the evaluation of some key ethical questions relating, in particular, to religious liberty and toleration, to multiculturalism, to personal spiritual exploration, and ultimately to issues of life and death. The course is specifically designed for students studying at the FSU London Study Centre as it makes extensive use of the city itself as a site of discovery, inspiration and reflection.
3
IDS3435Please Please Me: Anglo-American Youth Culture from the 1950s to the Present

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
INS3003Introduction to International Affairs

This course introduces students to the core questions and concerns of international affairs. The course surveys the many distinct academic disciplines that together contribute to the development of an interdisciplinary understanding of the international system. The course also examines how each of these disciplines understands the international system, the questions it raises, and its strengths and weaknesses. In addition, the course provides an introduction to many of the global issues of interest to international affairs majors, including terrorism, democracy, and globalization. At the end of this course, students have the skills and knowledge required to construct their own specialized plan of study in international affairs.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
3
MAC1140Pre-Calculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAC2312Calculus with Analytic Geometry II

This course covers techniques of integration; applications of integration; series and Taylor series; differential equations. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
PHM2121Philosophy of Race, Class, and Gender

In this course students study selected contemporary philosophical, literary, and journalistic discussions of questions regarding race, class, and gender with a particular emphasis on the status of these discussions in the United States. Students also survey theoretical accounts of the concepts of race, class, and gender, as well as their interrelatedness, and examine their application to various contemporary social issues.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
STA2122Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course covers normal distributions, sampling variation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, correlation, simple and multiple regression, contingency tables and chi-square tests, non-parametric statistics. No credit given for STA 2122 if a grade of "C-" or better is earned in STA 2171, STA 3032 or QMB 3200.
3
THE2000Introduction to Theatre*

This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.
3
THE3061Introduction to Theatre in London*

This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Center. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3

*/**/***/****/^ Courses followed by these symbols denote cross listing. Students may take one or the other, but not both.

Money Matters

We understand financial considerations heavily influence study abroad decisions. The International Programs Financial Team hosts financial aid workshops and can answer financial aid questions during in-person advising appointments or via email: IP-FinancialAid@fsu.edu.

Program Fees

Instead of main campus tuition, participants pay an international program fee that typically includes instructional costs for a set number of IP credit hours, housing abroad during the program dates, international health insurance coverage, plus excursions & group activities. Each program fee is listed on the garnet Description tab of the program page, along with the specific expenses that are/are not included.

Payments

The program fee is split into two payments: a non-refundable ‘commitment fee’ followed by a second ‘full payment’ deadline to pay the remaining balance of the program fee. Check the garnet Dates & Docs tab of the program page for specific payment due dates. To make a payment, click here. Always review the cancellation & fee liability policy for your program before making a payment or deferment.

Financial Aid

Almost all sources of Financial aid (Florida Prepaid, Bright Futures, Loans, Grants, VA funding, Scholarships) are applicable toward program fees. Click the boxes below and review the IP Financial Aid Handbook to learn more about financial aid for studying abroad, including the fee deferment process that allows those receiving financial aid to delay paying a portion of their program fee until the beginning of their program, when most financial aid will have disbursed. A deferment does not reduce your balance owed, it only changes the due date.

For information about the 1098-T form, click here.



Florida Bright Futures

Florida Bright Futures scholarship funds may be used to help pay the program fee for every semester a student is abroad.

The Florida Department of Education website contains additional information concerning eligibility, renewal criteria, appeal processes and legislative updates.

Credit Hours Bright Futures Academic
$213.55 Per Credit Hour
Bright Futures Medallion
$160.16 Per Credit Hour
6 $1281.30 $960.96
7 $1494.85 $1121.12
8 $1708.40 $1281.28
9 $1921.95 $1441.44
10 $2135.50 $1601.60
11 $2349.05 $1761.76
12 $2562.60 $1921.92
13 $2776.15 $2082.08
14 $2989.70 $2242.24
15 $3203.25 $2402.40
16 $3416.80 $2562.56
17 $3630.35 $2722.72
18 $3843.90 $2882.88

Quick Links

Florida Prepaid

Florida Prepaid (FPP) tuition and local fees and/or dorm benefits may be used to pay International Programs fees.

To use a Florida Prepaid dorm account during the summer term, the purchaser of the Prepaid account must contact Florida Prepaid and complete the steps required to authorize use of the summer dorm plan for studying abroad. All other plans will be billed by FSU without additional authorization.

Contact Florida Prepaid directly at 1-800-552-4723 or access their requirements online at https://www.myfloridaprepaid.com/resources/forms/.

Note: Eligibility for summer financial aid requires enrollment in at least six credits.

How much is my Florida Prepaid worth if I study abroad?

# of Credits Enrolled FPP Tuition FPP Local Fees* Dorm Rate
1 $115.08 $34.73 $4050.00
2 $230.16 $69.46 Per Term**
3 $345.24 $104.19
4 $460.32 $138.92
5 $575.40 $173.65
6 $690.48 $208.38
7 $805.56 $243.11
8 $920.64 $277.84
9 $1035.72 $312.57
10 $1150.80 $347.30
11 $1265.88 $382.03
12 $1380.96 $416.76
13 $1496.04 $451.49
14 $1611.12 $486.22
15 $1726.20 $520.95
16 $1841.28 $555.68
17 $1956.36 $590.41
  • * Please note the above tuition and fees are subject to change at any time.
  • ** Contact FPP for authorization instructions to use dorm account during a summer term: 850-309-1660 ext. 4134

Quick Links

International Programs Scholarship Opportunities

International Programs strives to award an average of $200,000 in scholarships annually to about 100 students.

Current FSU students who have been admitted to an international program can apply to IP scholarships through the FS4U portal (link below). Before applying, students should review the list of available scholarship opportunities as well as the application process instructions.

Please note: IP scholarships are not available to in-state/out-of-state students currently on the First Year Abroad (FYA) program or First Semester Abroad (FSA) program or those who are directly enrolled at FSU Panama. Some scholarships may have additional eligibility criteria in addition to what is listed below. Please reference the Scholarship Application Instructions for complete details.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Program Start Date Scholarship Open Date Scholarship Application Deadline Scholarship Award Decisions Communicated to Applicants
Summer 2024 November 1, 2023 December 31, 2023 Prior to January 17, 2024
Fall 2024 January 10, 2024 April 24, 2024 Prior to May 22, 2024
Spring 2025 April 29, 2024 September 4, 2024 Prior to September 18, 2024

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

Other departments at FSU also offer their own study abroad scholarship opportunities. You can review the list of scholarships administered by other FSU departments by following the link below.

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

Other departments at FSU also offer their own study abroad scholarship opportunities. You can review the list of scholarships administered by other FSU departments by following the link below.

Other Scholarship Opportunities

Follow the link below for a general listing of  scholarships that may be available for international study. These scholarships are available to both FSU students and non-FSU students.

Related Materials

External Links

Study Abroad Loans

Additional Discount or Savings Opportunities

Multi-Term Discount

Students who have completed 15 or more credit hours on programs administered by the International Programs office, earning at least a 3.0 average or above in their course work at an international location(s), are eligible for a discount for subsequent IP program. The discount is $500 for summer session or $1,000 for fall or spring semester. Note: This discount is built into the program fees for First Year Abroad program students.

FSU Fees

Technology Fee (Not Included in Program Fees)

Florida State assesses a technology fee which is NOT included in the International Programs fee. The technology fee rate for 2021-2022 is assessed at $5.25 per credit hour for all students, regardless of location of study.

After registration, the student must pay the applicable technology fee; this fee is paid directly to Florida State University Student Business Services. Failure to pay this fee will result in a late payment charge being assessed to the student by Florida State University Student Business Services. International Programs has no control over the fee or any associated late payment penalty.

Facilities & Equipment Fees (Not Included in Program Fees)

International Programs fees do NOT include Facilities and Equipment Fees, which are assessed each semester for some majors (Medicine, Motion Pictures Arts, Music, Nursing, Fine Arts, Dance, Digital Media Production, etc.) even though you are studying overseas. If you are in one of these colleges/majors, you will be assessed a fee. Details can be found on the Registration Guide, under 'Fees and Financial Information.'

Financial Aid Info Sessions

The world is within your reach! Talk with a member of IP's Finances Team to learn how your financial aid can help you have a study abroad experience of a lifetime!

Join us for a virtual information session, register below! Or book an appointment with an IP Financial Aid representative, click here. For additional questions, contact us at IP-FinancialAid@fsu.edu. Be sure to follow us on social media @fsuip for updates.

  1. Wednesday, June 5, 2024 | 2:00 PM EST
    https://fsu.zoom.us/j/96584557889
  2. Friday, June 21, 2024 | 4:00 PM EST
    https://fsu.zoom.us/j/92205727895
  3. Monday, July 1, 2024 | 2:00 PM EST
    https://fsu.zoom.us/j/96750505653
  4. Friday, July 19, 2024 | 4:00 PM EST
    https://fsu.zoom.us/j/97618008590

Deferment Forms

The online fee deferment is located in the International Programs Student Portal under the Money Matters area. Login here to access the portal.

General Program Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

SUBMITTING CANCELLATION REQUESTS

Cancellation requests must be submitted by the applicant via email to IP-Cancel@fsu.edu. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the email subject line.

The day FSU International Programs receives the written cancellation request is considered the date of cancellation/withdrawal. Admitted International Program participants who cancel after a published payment due date will remain financially liable for program fees as described below.

FINANCIAL LIABILITY AFTER CANCELLATION

  • APPLICATION FEE: All International Programs applicants must pay a non-refundable, non-transferrable application fee before their application can be reviewed. Payment of the application fee does not guarantee admission. Application fee amounts vary by program.
  • COMMITMENT FEE: The Commitment Fee represents a financial commitment to participate in a specific International Program and is non-refundable after the Commitment Fee due date.
  • Admitted participants who fail to pay or defer the Commitment Fee by the published due date will be cancelled from their international program
  • Commitment Fee amounts vary by program and cannot be transferred between programs or semesters
  • REMAINING BALANCE: The balance of the program fee that remains after payment or deferment of the Commitment Fee is known as the remaining balance of program fees.
  • Participants who submit a cancellation request on or before the Full Payment Due Date will remain financially liable for the Commitment Fee previously paid or deferred
  • Failure to pay or defer the remaining balance of program fees by the published Full Payment Due Date will result in cancellation from the program
  • Participants who pay or defer the remaining balance of program fees but submit a cancellation request after the Full Payment Due Date will remain financially liable for the full program fee, including the Commitment Fee
  • DEFERRED FEES: Applicants who are confident they will receive financial aid or other assistance may financially commit to participate in an international program by submitting a legally binding fee deferment agreement to extend the due date for a portion of the Commitment Fee and/or the remaining balance of program fees.
  • International Programs must receive payment for all deferred fees on or before the 10th day of the program
  • Non-FSU students may not defer the Commitment Fee but may defer up to half of their remaining balance after payment of the Commitment Fee
  • Participants who request cancellation after submitting a legally binding fee deferment agreement will remain financially liable for the Commitment Fee or the full program fee, as determined by the timing of their cancellation request in relation to the published payment due dates as outlined above

REFUNDS / RELEASE OF LIABILITY FROM PROGRAM FEES

Refunds / release of liability cannot be granted in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun. In no instance is a refund or release of fee liability request considered if it is received after the end of the applicable program or semester, even if the cancellation or withdrawal occurred prior to the start of the program.

  • FULL REFUNDS of paid program fees (including the Commitment Fee) or a release of liability from deferred program fees will be granted for student cancellations prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances, upon submitting an appeal, accompanied by appropriate documentation:
  • Involuntary call to active duty
  • Death of the student or a death in the immediate family (parent or step-parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, sibling, or grandparent)
  • PARTIAL REFUNDS of paid program fees (NOT including the Commitment Fee) or a partial release of liability from deferred program fees may be granted for student cancellations prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances, upon submitting an appeal, accompanied by appropriate documentation:
  • Medical withdrawal: Illness of the student of such a duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by FSU’s University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  • Exceptional unforeseen circumstances beyond the control of the student with appropriate documentation, as approved by the International Programs refund committee.

APPEAL PROCESS FOR PARTIAL REFUNDS / RELEASE OF LIABILITY

Participants must submit appeal requests and appropriate documentation to the International Programs Refund Committee (IP-Cancel@fsu.edu). Last name and program code should be included in the email subject line. Submission of an appeal does not guarantee a partial refund or release of fee liability will be approved by the International Programs Refund Committee.

When evaluating appeals, the Refund Committee considers the timeliness of the cancellation request in relation to the event causing the need for withdrawal and in relation to the program start date. Should the Refund Committee approve an appeal on the basis of medical withdrawal or exceptional unforeseen circumstances, participants may receive a partial refund / partial release of fee liability as determined by their cancellation date in the chart below:


If Cancellation Date is…
Participant's Financial Liability if
appeal is approved by IP Refund
Committee
Max amount of refund / release of
financial liability if appeal is
approved by IP Refund Committee
60 days or more before
program start date
Commitment Fee + 25% of remaining
program fee balance
75% of program fee balance after the
commitment fee
59-31 days before
program start date
Commitment Fee + 50% of remaining
program fee balance
50% of program fee balance after the
commitment fee
30 days or less before
program start date
Commitment Fee + 75% of remaining
program fee balance
25% of program fee balance after the
commitment fee
On or after program
start date
Liable for full program fee No refund/release of financial
liability

REFUNDS/RELEASE OF LIABILITY OF PROGRAM FEES WHEN IP CANCELS A PROGRAM

Refunds of program fees/release of liability for program fees will be granted when International Programs cancels a program prior to the beginning of the applicable term.

If FSU International Programs cancels an International Program after the program start date (or after the start of domestic or online coursework prior to the study abroad component of Spring Break/short-term programs) due to causes beyond the control of FSU International Programs, including, but not limited to, acts of God; natural disasters; riots; war; epidemics; terrorist activities; government restrictions; failure of suppliers, subcontractors, or carriers; or travel warnings or prohibitions issued by the World Health Organization or any U.S. federal government agency, including the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Department of State, no refunds of any kind will be issued. However, FSU International Programs, in its sole discretion, may issue refunds for unused program costs such as housing.

Spring 2019 General Program Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

Application Fee

The $100 application fee is nonrefundable.

Confirmation Deposit

The $1500 confirmation deposit is refundable until the close of business on the deposit’s due date. If an applicant has paid the deposit or been granted a deferred payment plan for the deposit and has not withdrawn from a program as of the close of business on the deposit due date, the applicant becomes fully liable for the confirmation deposit. Students whose offer of admission to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) will not be able to participate but remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit.

Full Program Fee

Program applicants who have demonstrated their intent to participate in the program by payment or by deferral of the confirmation deposit and who have not withdrawn from the program as of the full payment due date become fully liable for the full program fee as of the close of business on the full payment due date.

Refunds of Program Fees

Refunds of program fees WILL BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Cancellation of program by International Programs
  2. Involuntary call to active duty
  3. Death of the student or death in the immediate family (parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, or sibling)

Refunds of program fees will not be granted where a student becomes ineligible to participate in a program for failure to meet or maintain admission requirements.

Partial Refunds of Program Fees

Partial refunds of program fees MAY BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Illness of the student of such duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by Florida State's University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  2. Exceptional circumstances that could not have been foreseen and were beyond the control of the student, as approved by the International Programs’ refund committee.
    • Timely notification in relation to the event that caused the need for withdrawal will be considered in evaluating refund requests. In no instance will a request be considered if it is made after the end of the semester for which the refund is requested.
    • Refunds cannot be granted, under any circumstances, in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun.
    • Applicants who apply and are accepted after the published due dates remain liable for fees in accordance with the published due dates.
  3. Rescission of admission by the Florida State University Office of Admission for failure to meet the conditions of one’s admission. Students whose admission offer to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit

Submitting Withdrawals, Requests for Refunds, and Release from Fee Liability

All withdrawals, requests for refunds, and requests for release from fee liability must be submitted in writing via email to International Programs. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the subject line of the email.

Alternatively, requests can be submitted in writing to International Programs at the following postal address:

Attention: Refund Committee
Office of FSU International Programs
A5500 University Center
282 Champions Way
P.O. Box 3062420
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420

Visa Information

England

A visa is not required for U.S. citizens participating on a study-abroad program shorter than six months. Anyone wishing to partake in two consecutive semesters will likely be required to obtain a visa and should contact an Immigration Coordinator, at IP-Visas@fsu.edu, for assistance.

  • Passport Validity: Participants must hold a passport valid for at least six months beyond their intended departure from the United Kingdom. For more information regarding passports, please visit Passports on our website.
  • Arrival in the UK: Participants will be issued an immigration letter before departing the U.S. which explains that you will be partaking on a study abroad program in the UK.
  • Non-U.S. & Dual Citizens: Immigration requirements for non-U.S. citizens may be different than those of U.S. citizens. Please be advised that you will need to be in possession of your Permanent Resident Card, or U.S. visa, to allow re-entry into the United States following your program. If you are a non-U.S. citizen or hold dual-citizenship status, please contact IP-Visas@fsu.edu.

Important Dates & Documents

Summer 2024
Applications Open*Wednesday, October 04, 2023 $100.00
Scholarship Applications DueSunday, December 31, 2023
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, January 17, 2024$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, February 14, 2024

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

***

Fall 2024
Applications Open*Wednesday, December 06, 2023 $100.00
Scholarship Applications DueWednesday, April 24, 2024
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, May 22, 2024$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, June 26, 2024

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

***

Spring 2025
Applications Open*Wednesday, April 03, 2024 $100.00
Scholarship Applications DueWednesday, September 04, 2024
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, September 18, 2024$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, October 16, 2024

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

***

Documents

Health & Safety

For 60 years, Florida State University International Programs has been committed to providing a rewarding academic and cultural experience that enriches the lives of our students. Our highest priority is and always has been the welfare and security of our students.

Program directors maintain contact with our Tallahassee office, local authorities, and United States officials, both at home and abroad. Each program holds meetings with students in which safety procedures and precautions are detailed and regularly re-emphasized. Each program has an Emergency Plan which includes details about local health care facilities, meeting points and procedures, and contingency plans and funds should it ever become necessary to evacuate our students.

Students are reminded to inform International Programs of the details of their independent travel details via our online travel form, heed US State Department travel advisories, and take relevant emergency and US Embassy/Consulate contact information with them.

Students venture abroad to experience other cultures, and to gain a deeper appreciation of their role as American citizens in the world. FSU International Programs is fully committed to helping students realize these aspirations in a safe and secure learning environment.

Insurance

International Programs Insurance

All International Programs fees include international medical and evacuation insurance coverage through Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI). A link to our policy is provided below. The coverage will be effective for participants from the day the program starts until the day the program ends. Please note: this policy is NOT intended to replace your domestic coverage. For more information, visit studentinsurance.fsu.edu.

Travel Insurance Information

FSU International Programs encourages program participants to consider purchasing travel insurance. Travel insurance comes in many forms and can protect you in case you need to change your travel plans due to unforeseen circumstances. The coverage ranges from help with lost baggage to delay in flight plans to trip cancellation.

Travel insurance that covers fees associated with changing your airfare plans is especially helpful for those attending programs that require entry or student visas. Immigration approval can take months with regulations changing often that can cause the need to delay or cancel flight plans. Often airfare arrangements are non-refundable or cannot be changed without fee penalties. Certain types of trip cancellation insurance will reimburse you the cost of your airfare or penalty fees. Travel Insurance must cover failure to obtain visa.

You may wish to begin researching travel insurance and trip cancellation policies by using the Travel Insurance Review website. Their Travel Insurance 101: The Complete Guide to Travel Insurance section is particularly helpful for those just beginning their research. They also have a section that allows you to compare different policies.

Travel insurance is also offered through CISI and Travel Insured International. Please note that this plan must be purchased within 21 days of paying your first fee. For example, if looking to insure the cost of the program, the plan must be purchased within 21 days of paying the commitment fee to International Programs. If wishing to insure only the cost of the flight, the plan must be purchased within 21 days of purchasing airfare.

Travel Resources

University Policies & Resources

Clery Act

In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Florida State University study center safety guides include institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, and other matters. The report also contains statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain off campus buildings or property owned or controlled by The Florida State University; and on public property within or immediately adjacent and accessible from the campus. A paper copy is available upon request to FSU International Programs at A5500 University Center, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420, or by contacting FSU International Programs at (850) 644-3272 or (800) 374-8581.

Copies are also available from the study center administrative offices, or you may download from the links below: