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Broad Curriculum Program | Valencia, Spain

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The broad curriculum program gives students the opportunity to earn credits in both general requirements and elective courses while experiencing Valencia and surrounding areas of Spain. The curriculum encompasses basic Liberal Studies, Hispanic Culture, Intensive Spanish Study, and Business. Students can also take math and science courses at the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia and the Universidad Católica de Valencia, due to our affiliation with these institutions.

Participants in this program experience both local and more distant travel opportunities that are tied to critical means of academic study. Each term includes weekly group activities, as well as a complete cultural program featuring two mandatory excursions. All group trips provide comfortable accommodations and visits to a wealth of important sites. Most courses in all terms allow a three-day weekend for additional exploration activities.

Students enjoy a 10-day mid-semester break which provides opportunity for personal travel.

Program Sessions

Do not purchase airline tickets until advised to do so by International Programs.

CodeTermStart DateEnd DateFeeApply
VA04Fall 201708/31/1712/14/17$12,995.00
VA05Spring 201801/04/1804/19/18$12,995.00
VA03Summer 201805/10/1808/02/18$12,975.00
VA01Summer 201805/10/1806/21/18$8,485.00
VA02Summer 201806/28/1808/02/18$7,745.00
VA04Fall 201808/30/1812/13/18$12,995.00
VA05Spring 201901/10/1904/25/19$12,995.00

Program Description

Eligibility

This program is open to all interested students.

Academic Program Requirements

Students must enroll in a class with a prefix of SPN, SPT, SPW, ANT, EUH, HUM, or enroll in IFS 2099.

Iberian Studies Minor

The Iberian Studies Valencia Center Minor enhances and provides focus to a student’s program in Spain. The minor is built around the Valencia residency, but can be pursued before and after it as well: 15 credits are required (to include at least two disciplines), of which 9 credits must be taken in Valencia. Students may choose from various Iberian Studies disciplines. Consult the FSU Bulletin and contact International Programs for formal declaration of the minor.

Housing

Accommodations feature the latest technology, including a computer lab, library, and wi-fi throughout the common areas, classrooms, and apartments. Students live in shared rooms in fully equipped apartments complete with kitchens, lounge space, and TVs. The center offers 24/7 front desk coverage and free laundry facilities. If these spaces are filled, students will be housed in comparable accommodations within central Valencia.

Excursions & Group Activities

Plans may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities. Cultural immersion and social events planned for this program may include:

  • Overnight Excursions

    Madrid excursion visiting El Prado Museum and surrounding locations of Toledo, Segovia, Salamanca or Alcalá de Hernares; Barcelona excursion visiting the Dalí Museum and Sagrada Familia; Andalucía excursion visiting Granada’s Alhambra, Sevilla, Córdoba and flamenco activities; Pyrenees excursion with river water activities, medieval castles, monasteries, mountain activities

  • Day Excursions/Valencia Excursions

    Roman city of Sagunto, Xátiva Castle, wineries of Requena, mountain walks, historical locations, special interactive museum visits, nature activities

  • Class Excursions

    Valencia Court, local archaeology sites, historical landmarks, local markets, theaters, operas

  • Other Activities

    • Weekly activities including: sports events, exchange conversation meetings, tours, food tasting, group dinners, and special events
    • Club de Español weekly events for total immersion in the Spanish language
    • Classes integrated in the local Universidad Politécnica de Valencia and Universidad Católica with access to state of-the-art labs
    • Lectures and demonstrations by Spanish professionals in various fields of work
    • Las Fallas celebration

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • Instructional costs for up to 16 credit hours (fall/spring/full summer) or up to 10 credit hours (5 or 6 week summer sessions)
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Breakfast on class days (fall/spring)
  • 4 meal vouchers per week while school is in session (each worth approximately 7 Euros)
  • Program-planned excursions/group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • 24/7 student support, including staff who live on-site
  • Health insurance
  • Entry visa for any program over 90 days in length
  • Scheduled group airport pick-up
  • International student ID card
  • IP t-shirt
  • Travel water bottle, luggage tag, and luggage strap

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity/spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., per credit hour technology fee)

Courses

VA01-6-18: Summer 2018
CourseTitleCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture & Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ENT2802Entrepreneurship and Contemporary Society

This course explores entrepreneurship in society by understanding how innovation can led to commerce and how commerce impacts our daily lives. Topics include the process of innovation, the nature of entrepreneurialism, the essence of Problem-Opportunity-Venture-Operations (POVO) model, the lean star-up business model, different kinds of entrepreneurship (commercial, social, scientific and artistic) and an introduction to competencies that have facilitated success in other entrepreneurs.
3
ENT3003Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This course is a broad survey of entrepreneurship. It exposes students to different types of entrepreneurship and covers an array of topics that span from idea generation through venture formation, financing, and management while helping students build knowledge and skills to be a successful entrepreneur.
3
FIL2001Introduction to Cinema Studies

This course introduces students to film analysis theories and techniques, including the basics of dramatic structure, genre, prevalent filmmaking theories, and film production processes. Through weekly film screenings, class discussion, and hands-on production exercises, students develop and practice skills to help them compare and interpret films representing a variety of genres, aesthetic traditions, and cultural contexts.
3
FIN3140Personal Finance

This course is a study of the concepts and processes in planning, analyzing, and controlling personal financial resources. Emphasizes financial planning, cash and credit management, managing expenditures, income and asset protection, investment planning, and retirement and estate planning. For nonbusiness majors only. Credit not allowed for business majors.
3
FIN3403Financial Management of the Firm

This course is an examination of the basic concepts involved in the investment, financing, and dividend decisions of the business firm. Managerial orientation with emphasis on identification, analysis, and solution of financial problems confronting the firm.
3
GEB3213Business Communication

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HUM3321Multicultural Dimensions of Film and 20th Century Culture

This course examines the impact of American Cinema on social relations and on the reproduction of power. Students benefit from this course by learning a matrix of movie history, movie genres, and approaches to multiculturalism by which to judge movies, cultural representation and the cultural experiences of life. The movies provide a window into middle and late 20th century cultures, which serve as comparisons and contrasts for culture in the 21st century.
3
HUM3930Humanities: Culture & Civilization of Spain

Spain is a complex and vivacious country with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, culture and society of the different people who have contributed to the formation of the current European nation from its origin to the present. The students will learn about Spain not only through readings and lectures, but also, and most importantly, through real life experiences, such as excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, monuments, museums, churches and other places of interest. We will also study the fundamental importance of Spanish food culture as a socio-cultural element worthy of serious analysis. This course will also make use of select films to enhance our analysis of Spanish culture.
3
HUN1201The Science of Nutrition

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
IFS2027Animation and Identity

This course examines the medium of animation and the contributions of influential animators with a focus on how identity and societal milieu influence artistic expression in animation. Through animation screenings, discussion, and hands-on animation exercises, students are exposed to diverse animation styles and approaches, create original short animations, and come to better understand the creative process utilized in animation.
3
IFS2099Art As Propaganda

Visual Arts may sometimes be seen as merely things to hang on a wall or placed in a room to be passively viewed. However significant works of visual art, particularly at the time of their creation, have the power to shape ideology, cultural trends and even politics. Similarly, architecture makes buildings more than just utilitarian. This course traces the evolution of Western art and architecture from 1066 and its impact on the thoughts and practices of its time. Beginning with the Bayeux Tapestry (emphatically heralding William the Conqueror’s conquest of England), selected works will be examined not only for their aesthetic value but also for their impact on society. Specifically, why are some works heralded as masterpieces; what sets them apart? Why do we study works and buildings created centuries ago? What value do these works bring to current societal attitudes? Why are some works ignored and then later highly acclaimed? What compels us to create and study art? Has today’s tremendous consumption of media changed the role of visual arts? Furthermore, by examining these works of art and architecture, students will not only learn about their significance and how they reflect the artistic and cultural attitudes of the time, they will also learn the characteristics of the societal trends associated with Christianity, Humanism, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Mannerism, Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Modern and Post-modernism. Valencia offers the student a rare opportunity to see all of these art forms first hand through field trips to the Cathedral, Belles Artes Museum, etc.
3
IND3930Special Topics: Sketching the City

May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.
3
MAC1140Pre-Calculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAC2311Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MMC2000Introduction to the Mass Media

This course covers a historical and social overview of the mass media and their relationship to the mass communication process in a modern society.
3
PGY2100cPhoto for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
PHI2010Introduction to Philosophy

This course introduces some of the central problems in philosophy. Students also learn how to construct and criticize arguments and develop their own philosophical positions.
3
PHI2635Bioethics

This course is an examination of the philosophical foundations of bioethical theory and an exploration of the trenchant issues in contemporary bioethics with a concentration on discussions of race, gender, and vulnerable populations (e.g. the poor, immigrants). The course employs tools of ethical theory, philosophical analysis, and analytic writing to examine a number of moral issues arising in health care including justice in health care, experimentation and research on human subjects, reproductive technology, aging, organ donation, and euthanasia. Throughout the course we examine assumptions about rights, persons, and ethical principles at work in medical decisions.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its applications to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPW3104Readings from Modern Spain

This course provides students, through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3
SYG2010Social Problems

This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society, which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.
3
SYO3100Family Problems and Social Change

This course is a basic sociological approach to conditions, issues, and problems of familial organization within the context of changing institutional structures of modern society. Attention is given to such questions as: How have spouse roles changed, and why? How do changes in the organization of work affect family experience? How are family and kinship patterns affected by an aging population?
3
VA02-6-18: Summer 2018
CourseTitleCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology

This course is an introduction to modern anthropological archaeology. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary scientific approaches employed in contemporary archaeological research and provides students with an overview of the origins and evolution of human social and economic systems.
3
ANT2100LIntroduction to Archaeology Lab

The course is conducted as a hands-on laboratory in archaeological methodology. Each week, students have a series of laboratory exercises designed to teach specific analytical techniques, including paleozoological analysis, paleobotanical analysis, geophysical prospecting techniques, and GIS.
1
ART3930Special Topics: The Ceramics of Valencia (S/U only)

Students will learn the significance of ceramics in Valencia by interpreting through writing, making objects at a local art center (one has already been vetted by the program director) and visiting museums and artists. The city has an unusual amount of museums dedicated to ceramics as well as ceramic artisans and artists. The National Museum of Ceramics, the former artisan ceramic production city of Manises and a world re-known factory nearby, the Lladro Porcelain Company all focus on historical and contemporary exhibitions on ceramics. By interacting, interpreting and responding to ceramics as material culture and as art, students will learn the historical trade routes, the transference of technical processes and the aesthetic changes that took place from early Roman cultures to contemporary times. Understanding the information gathered after visits will be evaluated by writing, tests on terms, earth materials and visual critiques after hands-on technical making of the ceramics.
3
GEA3563The Mediterranean

This course analyzes the Mediterranean region as a unified totality (southern Europe and North Africa), focusing on historical changes that underpin current geography.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
GEO3423Sports Geography

This course focuses on the geographical basis of sports at different spatial scales, including locational strategies of franchises, recruiting patterns, and the urban political economy of professional sports arenas.
3
HUM3930Culture and Civilization of Spain

May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.
3
HUN2125Food and Society

This course examines the impact of society on human food ways, role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MUH2019Modern Popular Music

This course surveys the development of popular music in America from the early 20th century to the present with a focus on the cultural, social, economic, technological, and political conditions surrounding that music. The course widens student's comprehension of the times, places, cultural contexts, intellectual debates, and economic conditions that foster (or hinder) artistic innovation.
3
MUH2051Music World Cultures

This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. Students analyze tradition as a constantly evolving and transformative entity that nurtures and sustains core cultural values. The social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts is emphasized.
3
PGY2100cPhoto for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its applications to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.
3
SPN3350Spanish for Heritage Speakers 

This course offers intensive Spanish for heritage speakers who have had little or no formal training in the language. Writing skills are emphasized over oral communication.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN4540Regional Cultural Studies

This course provides students with exposure to texts and cultural productions from specific regions of Latin America, Spain, or the Latino enclaves in the U.S. Texts may include historical documents, legends and myths, poetry, fiction, essays, or popular music. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Duplicate registration allowed in the same semester.
3
SPN4780Spanish Phonetics

This course involves training in the production of acceptable speech sounds in Spanish and a knowledge of when to use those sounds (allophonic distribution). The class meets both in the classroom and in the language laboratory. The nonnative speaker can profit most from this course.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema

This course is a study of the films, movements and directors of Hispanic cinema. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.
3
SPW3104Readings from Modern Spain

This course provides students, through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3
VA04-9-17: Fall 2017
CourseTitleCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology

This course is an introduction to modern anthropological archaeology. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary scientific approaches employed in contemporary archaeological research and provides students with an overview of the origins and evolution of human social and economic systems.
3
ANT2100LIntroduction Archaeology Lab

The course is conducted as a hands-on laboratory in archaeological methodology. Each week, students have a series of laboratory exercises designed to teach specific analytical techniques, including paleozoological analysis, paleobotanical analysis, geophysical prospecting techniques, and GIS.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government & Politics

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course includes drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HUM2210Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from prehistoric times to about 400 A.D.
3
HUM2235From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.
3
HUM3930Special Topics: Culture & Civilization of Spain

Spain is a complex and vivacious country with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, culture and society of the different people who have contributed to the formation of the current European nation from its origin to the present. The students will learn about Spain not only through readings and lectures, but also, and most importantly, through real life experiences, such as excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, monuments, museums, churches and other places of interest. We will also study the fundamental importance of Spanish food culture as a socio-cultural element worthy of serious analysis. This course will also make use of select films to enhance our analysis of Spanish culture. This course counts as a Core Course for the Iberian Studies minor. This course may be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.
3
HUN1201Science of Nutrition

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
IFS2098Global Engagement (online) (required of all freshmen)

Study your study-abroad country through first-hand encounters and engagement. The coursework gives you the opportunity to study your country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with your own through actively participating in cultural experiences. In addition to weekly reflective assignments, the course will ask you to choose a specific custom to report on such as looking at race and social class through the football and cricket sporting cultures in England or the significance of the patriarchal society through the courtship dances in Italy.
1
IFS2099Crossing the Atlantic: Hemingway in Spain; Lorca in Americas

Federico García Lorca and Ernest Hemingway are two of the most internationally recognized literary and cultural figures of the 20th century. That is, not only are they viewed with great interest and even division and controversy in their birth countries of Spain and the United States respectively, but they continue to cast a long shadow across the globe and especially over the Atlantic. Furthermore, not only did each of these two compelling figures leave a deep footprint in the other´s country, but they were also influenced and greatly inspired by the socio-cultural patrimony of the other´s homeland. By studying and analyzing Lorca in America and Hemingway in Spain students will explore an inter-cultural journey that reaches the core of how many Spaniards view America and how many Americans view Spain to this day. In this course we will engage, explore and envision Lorca in America and Hemingway in Spain within the enriching comparative context regarding a number of points of analysis: socio-cultural identity and customs, the environment, ethnicity, sexual identity, religion, geography, the artistic merit versus the ethical complexities of the bullfight, human rights and the cruelties of warfare. This course satisfies the Liberal Studies Humanities and Cultural Practice requirement.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
2
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its applications to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.
3
SPN3350Spanish for Heritage Speakers

This course offers intensive Spanish for heritage speakers who have had little or no formal training in the language. Writing skills are emphasized over oral communication.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3440Language and Culture in Business

This intermediate-level language course is aimed at raising cross-cultural awareness in international business. It is also designed to better prepare students to meet the challenges of a global economy.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema

This course is a study of the films, movements and directors of Hispanic cinema. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.
3
SPW3104Readings from Modern Spain

This course provides students, through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3
VA04-9-18: Fall 2018
CourseTitleCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology

This course is an introduction to modern anthropological archaeology. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary scientific approaches employed in contemporary archaeological research and provides students with an overview of the origins and evolution of human social and economic systems.
3
ANT2100LIntroduction to Archaeology Lab

The course is conducted as a hands-on laboratory in archaeological methodology. Each week, students have a series of laboratory exercises designed to teach specific analytical techniques, including paleozoological analysis, paleobotanical analysis, geophysical prospecting techniques, and GIS.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government & Politics

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course includes drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HUM2020The Art of Being Human

In this course, students gain an overview of the development of Western culture from Antiquity to the present as it is expressed through the arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, music, film and the performing arts), and especially through literature. The course examines the human condition through culture and the arts to better understand how the humanities are interconnected.
3
HUM2235From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.
3
HUM3930Special Topics: Culture & Civilization of Spain

Spain is a complex and vivacious country with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, culture and society of the different people who have contributed to the formation of the current European nation from its origin to the present. The students will learn about Spain not only through readings and lectures, but also, and most importantly, through real life experiences, such as excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, monuments, museums, churches and other places of interest. We will also study the fundamental importance of Spanish food culture as a socio-cultural element worthy of serious analysis. This course will also make use of select films to enhance our analysis of Spanish culture. This course counts as a Core Course for the Iberian Studies minor. This course may be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.
3
HUN1201Science of Nutrition

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
IFS2098Global Engagement (Online)

Study your study-abroad country through first-hand encounters and engagement. The coursework gives you the opportunity to study your country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with your own through actively participating in cultural experiences. In addition to weekly reflective assignments, the course will ask you to choose a specific custom to report on such as looking at race and social class through the football and cricket sporting cultures in England or the significance of the patriarchal society through the courtship dances in Italy.
1
IFS2099Crossing the Atlantic: Hemingway in Spain; Lorca in Americas

Federico García Lorca and Ernest Hemingway are two of the most internationally recognized literary and cultural figures of the 20th century. That is, not only are they viewed with great interest and even division and controversy in their birth countries of Spain and the United States respectively, but they continue to cast a long shadow across the globe and especially over the Atlantic. Furthermore, not only did each of these two compelling figures leave a deep footprint in the other´s country, but they were also influenced and greatly inspired by the socio-cultural patrimony of the other´s homeland. By studying and analyzing Lorca in America and Hemingway in Spain students will explore an inter-cultural journey that reaches the core of how many Spaniards view America and how many Americans view Spain to this day. In this course we will engage, explore and envision Lorca in America and Hemingway in Spain within the enriching comparative context regarding a number of points of analysis: socio-cultural identity and customs, the environment, ethnicity, sexual identity, religion, geography, the artistic merit versus the ethical complexities of the bullfight, human rights and the cruelties of warfare. This course satisfies the Liberal Studies Humanities and Cultural Practice requirement.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
2
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its applications to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.
3
SPN3350Spanish for Heritage Speakers

This course offers intensive Spanish for heritage speakers who have had little or no formal training in the language. Writing skills are emphasized over oral communication.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3440Language and Culture in Business

This intermediate-level language course is aimed at raising cross-cultural awareness in international business. It is also designed to better prepare students to meet the challenges of a global economy.
3
SPN4540Regional Cultural Studies

This course provides students with exposure to texts and cultural productions from specific regions of Latin America, Spain, or the Latino enclaves in the U.S. Texts may include historical documents, legends and myths, poetry, fiction, essays, or popular music. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Duplicate registration allowed in the same semester.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema

This course is a study of the films, movements and directors of Hispanic cinema. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.
3
VA05-1-19: Spring 2019
CourseTitleCredits
BSC1005General Biology for Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology for Non-Majors Laboratory

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CHM1046General Chemistry II

This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
3
CHM1046LGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
1
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH2000Ancient & Medieval Civilizations

This course provides a survey of Western traditions from the beginnings through the end of the Middle Ages. Emphasis is on patterns of thinking and on those institutions most distinctive for the Western tradition. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for EUH 2000. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HUM2250Humanities: 18th-Century Romanticism to Postmodernism

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the 18th-century Romanticism to the Postmodern period.
3
HUM3930Spanish Culture & Civilization

Spain is a complex and vivacious country with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, culture and society of the different people who have contributed to the formation of the current European nation from its origin to the present. The students will learn about Spain not only through readings and lectures, but also, and most importantly, through real life experiences, such as excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, monuments, museums, churches and other places of interest. We will also study the fundamental importance of Spanish food culture as a socio-cultural element worthy of serious analysis. This course will also make use of select films to enhance our analysis of Spanish culture. This course counts as a Core Course for the Iberian Studies minor.
3
HUN2125Food & Society

This course examines the impact of society on human food ways, role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.
3
IFS2099Festivals: Artisanship, Satire, and Fire

In Western Humanity there is a long standing tradition of celebrations and festivals that manifest our roots as human beings. The author Anthony Burgess once stated that, “It’s always good to remember where you come from and celebrate it. To remember where you come from is part of where you are going.” Since pre-history, some celebrations stem from pagan origins, while others derived from organized religion backgrounds. This course will be a general Trans-Atlantic view of some celebrations and festivals that currently shape society, and individuals in the modern Western World. We will closely examine them from their historical roots, and how they have developed into international tourist attractions. Particular focus will emphasize how these events impact us a society locally, regionally, and globally. We will explore Autumn Festivals such as Oktoberfest, and those celebrations that mark the beginning of warm weather such as carnival in Venice and Rio de Janeiro. As we are in a unique area of Western Europe, attention will be given to Spain, yet with special emphasis on festivities in the city of Valencia. For example, the world famous Fallas festival, the “Tomatina festival in Buñol, or the running and swimming with the bulls in the town of Denia. Moreover , as The United States is a country with various cultural groups, we will study and analyze such celebrations in our country as: The Day of The Dead, Running of The Bulls, Quinceañeras, Mardi Gras Carnival, etc. In the final analysis, celebrations and festivities are some of the basic common links that we have while inhabiting this small planet, and a manifestation of global diversity and society. This course satisfies the Liberal Studies Humanities and Cultural Practice requirement.
3
LIT3383Women in Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
2
MAC1140Pre-Calculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MGF1106Math for Liberal Arts I

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
MUL2010Music Literature, Listening, and Understanding

This course is an introduction to music as a manifestation of human culture, as an expressive art form, and as an intellectual discipline. The course also develops a knowledge of a variety of significant musical repertoire, skills for perceptive listening, and the ability to respond to musical expression with critical insight.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its applications to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.
3
SPN3350Spanish for Heritage Speakers

This course offers intensive Spanish for heritage speakers who have had little or no formal training in the language. Writing skills are emphasized over oral communication.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN4444Business Writing in Spanish

This course covers letter writing, business terminology, as well as conducting business in the Hispanic world.
3
SPN4540Regional Cultural Studies

This course provides students with exposure to texts and cultural productions from specific regions of Latin America, Spain, or the Latino enclaves in the U.S. Texts may include historical documents, legends and myths, poetry, fiction, essays, or popular music. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Duplicate registration allowed in the same semester.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema

This course is a study of the films, movements and directors of Hispanic cinema. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.
3
SPW3104Readings from Modern Spain

This course provides students, through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3
VA05-1-18: Spring 2018
CourseTitleCredits
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CHM1046General Chemistry II

This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
3
CHM1046LGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
1
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH2000Ancient & Medieval Civilizations

This course provides a survey of Western traditions from the beginnings through the end of the Middle Ages. Emphasis is on patterns of thinking and on those institutions most distinctive for the Western tradition. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for EUH 2000. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HUM2250Humanities: 18th-Century Romanticism to Postmodernism

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the 18th-century Romanticism to the Postmodern period.
3
HUM3930Spanish Culture & Civilization

Spain is a complex and vivacious country with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, culture and society of the different people who have contributed to the formation of the current European nation from its origin to the present. The students will learn about Spain not only through readings and lectures, but also, and most importantly, through real life experiences, such as excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, monuments, museums, churches and other places of interest. We will also study the fundamental importance of Spanish food culture as a socio-cultural element worthy of serious analysis. This course will also make use of select films to enhance our analysis of Spanish culture. This course counts as a Core Course for the Iberian Studies minor.
3
HUN2125Food & Society

This course examines the impact of society on human food ways, role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.
3
IFS2099Festivals: Artisanship, Satire, and Fire

In Western Humanity there is a long standing tradition of celebrations and festivals that manifest our roots as human beings. The author Anthony Burgess once stated that, “It’s always good to remember where you come from and celebrate it. To remember where you come from is part of where you are going.” Since pre-history, some celebrations stem from pagan origins, while others derived from organized religion backgrounds. This course will be a general Trans-Atlantic view of some celebrations and festivals that currently shape society, and individuals in the modern Western World. We will closely examine them from their historical roots, and how they have developed into international tourist attractions. Particular focus will emphasize how these events impact us a society locally, regionally, and globally. We will explore Autumn Festivals such as Oktoberfest, and those celebrations that mark the beginning of warm weather such as carnival in Venice and Rio de Janeiro. As we are in a unique area of Western Europe, attention will be given to Spain, yet with special emphasis on festivities in the city of Valencia. For example, the world famous Fallas festival, the “Tomatina festival in Buñol, or the running and swimming with the bulls in the town of Denia. Moreover , as The United States is a country with various cultural groups, we will study and analyze such celebrations in our country as: The Day of The Dead, Running of The Bulls, Quinceañeras, Mardi Gras Carnival, etc. In the final analysis, celebrations and festivities are some of the basic common links that we have while inhabiting this small planet, and a manifestation of global diversity and society. This course satisfies the Liberal Studies Humanities and Cultural Practice requirement.
3
LIT3383Women in Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
2
MAC1140Pre-Calculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MGF1106Math for Liberal Arts I

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
MUH2019Modern Popular Music

This course surveys the development of popular music in America from the early 20th century to the present with a focus on the cultural, social, economic, technological, and political conditions surrounding that music. The course widens student's comprehension of the times, places, cultural contexts, intellectual debates, and economic conditions that foster (or hinder) artistic innovation.
3
MUH2051Music in World Cultures

This course provides an introductory survey of various musical traditions in a global perspective, exploring music both as a phenomenon of sound and as a phenomenon of culture. Students analyze tradition as a constantly evolving and transformative entity that nurtures and sustains core cultural values. The social context of music, including social structure, geography, globalization, mass mediation, concepts of religion, instruments, aesthetic priorities, and cultural beliefs that inform music within given cultural contexts is emphasized.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its applications to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.
3
SPN3350Spanish for Heritage Speakers

This course offers intensive Spanish for heritage speakers who have had little or no formal training in the language. Writing skills are emphasized over oral communication.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN4444Business Writing in Spanish

This course covers letter writing, business terminology, as well as conducting business in the Hispanic world.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema

This course is a study of the films, movements and directors of Hispanic cinema. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.
3
SPW3104Readings from Modern Spain

This course provides students, through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3

*/**/***/****/^ Courses followed by these symbols denote cross listing. Students may take one or the other, but not both.

Money Matters

The biggest factor in deciding when and where to study abroad is often the financial aspect. In fact, too many students assume they cannot afford to participate, missing out on an invaluable opportunity because they are not aware of alternative methods of funding. The Financial Assistance Coordinator at International Programs (IP) is dedicated to helping students through the financial aid application process by conducting financial aid workshops on a regular basis in addition to meeting personally with each student needing assistance. Students who have received some form of financial aid throughout their collegiate careers, as well as those completely new to the process, receive expert care every step of the way. We also help concerned parents! Additionally, students are strongly encouraged to contact the Financial Aid Office at their home school as early as possible. Finally, Florida State students will find additional helpful information on the FSU Financial Aid website.

Please review Understanding the Financial Aid Process for Students Studying Abroad to explore a range of issues for students who anticipate receiving any type of financial assistance. This is a document created just for FSU IP students and families, with step-by-step guidance for the process.

Florida Bright Futures

Florida Bright Futures scholarship funds may be used toward a semester abroad. The Bright Futures Academic Scholarship is available for all terms. The Academic scholarship will also include a $300 textbook award for fall and spring only. The Bright Futures Medallion Scholarship will not be available for the summer terms.

The Florida Department of Education website contains additional information concerning eligibility, renewal criteria, appeal processes and legislative updates.

Credit Hours Bright Futures Academic
$213.55 Per Credit Hour
Bright Futures Medallion
$77 Per Credit Hour
6 $1281.30 $462
7 $1494.85 $539
8 $1708.40 $616
9 $1921.95 $693
10 $2135.50 $770
11 $2349.05 $847
12 $2562.60 $924
13 $2776.15 $1001
14 $2989.70 $1078
15 $3203.25 $1155
16 $3416.80 $1232
17 $3630.35 $1309
18 $3843.90 $1386

Quick Links

Florida Prepaid

Students receiving Florida Prepaid tuition, local fees and/or dorm benefits, may defer a portion of their Program Fee against Florida Prepaid funds. Completing and submitting the fee deferment request form will allow IP to bill Florida Prepaid and apply these funds toward the program fee balance. Completion and submission of the fee deferment request form allows this process to occur.

Students may obtain the deferment form by selecting Deferment from the menu above.

To use a Florida Prepaid dorm account during a summer term, the purchaser of the Prepaid account must send a letter authorizing the use of the benefit. Letters should be mailed to: Florida Prepaid, 1804 Hermitage Blvd., Suite 210, Tallahassee, FL 32308. For more information, contact them at 1-800-552-4723.

Note: Eligibility for summer financial aid requires enrollment in at least six credits.

How much is my Florida Prepaid worth if I study abroad?

# of Credits Enrolled FPP Tuition FPP Local Fees* Dorm Rate
1 $115.08 $34.73 $3310.00
2 $230.16 $69.46 Per Term**
3 $345.24 $104.19
4 $460.32 $138.92
5 $575.40 $173.65
6 $690.48 $208.38
7 $805.56 $243.11
8 $920.64 $277.84
9 $1035.72 $312.57
10 $1150.80 $347.30
11 $1265.88 $382.03
12 $1380.96 $416.76
13 $1496.04 $451.49
14 $1611.12 $486.22
15 $1726.20 $520.95
  • * Please note the above tuition and fees are subject to change at any time.
  • ** Contact FPP for authorization instructions to use dorm account during a summer term: 850-309-1660 ext. 4134

Quick Links

Scholarship & Discount Opportunities

Florida State University has joined the Generation Study Abroad campaign sponsored by the Institute for International Education, committing to a goal of doubling the number of our study abroad participants by 2020. We are proud to be part of this pledge to undertake ambitious actions in order to increase the number of students who study abroad with Florida State!

As part of this commitment, International Programs has launched a $175,000 Generation Study Abroad Scholarships program, Which includes $70,000 worth of new scholarships as well as two existing scholarships being incorporated into the Generation Study Abroad Scholarships program.

Psychology In London Scholarship

This scholarship was established to encourage participation in the FSU Psychology in London summer program. Florida State degree-seeking students who have an overall GPA of 3.25 or above may apply for this need and merit-based scholarship.

Brooks Rogers Memorial Scholarship

Florida State degree-seeking students enrolled full-time in the College of Arts & Sciences or in the College of Fine Arts, who have an overall GPA of 2.85 or above may apply for this need-based scholarship. Preference is given to students studying Art History or the Humanities.

Generation Study Abroad Critical Language Scholarship

Florida State undergraduate degree-seeking students who are majoring or minoring in Chinese or Russian, and who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship. Scholarships are available summer sessions in Tianjin or Moscow. Amounts may be up to 50% of the program fee and are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad First Generation College Student Scholarship

Florida State undergraduate degree-seeking students who are the first in their family to attend college and who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship. Scholarships are available fall, spring, and summer sessions. Amounts may be up to 50% of the program fee and are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad International Programs Achievement Scholarship

Florida State degree-seeking students with an overall GPA of 3.8 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship, available fall, spring and summer sessions. Amounts are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad International Programs Anniversary Scholarship

Florida State degree-seeking students who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this need and merit-based scholarship, which is intended to help increase the number of Florida State students who study abroad. Scholarships are available fall, spring, and summer sessions; and amounts are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad STEM Student Scholarship

Florida State undergraduate degree-seeking students who are majoring in science, technology, engineering, or math, and who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this meritbased scholarship. Scholarships are available fall, spring, and summer sessions. Amounts may be up to 50% of the program fee and are determined based on the applicant pool.

Other International Programs Scholarship Opportunities

Minority Scholarship

To help more minorities study abroad, we offer a Minority Scholarship to degree-seeking Florida State ethnic minority students with an overall GPA of 2.5 or above. There are two $5,000 awards each semester, to be applied toward a fall or spring program in Florence, London, Panama City or Valencia.

Spring Break Scholarship

IP offers a limited number of scholarships for students participating in FSU IP Spring Break programs. Applicants must be Florida State degree-seeking students with an overall GPA of 3.8 or above and no demonstrated financial need or an overall GPA of 3.5 or above with demonstrated financial need. Scholarships will be up to 25% of the program fee.

Additional program-specific scholarships are available from the College of Social Work.

William Cullen Klein Memorial Scholarship

This scholarship was established in memory of Cullen Klein, a talented linguist double-majoring in Spanish and Chinese. His family established the scholarship in his memory to help open the world to other students through studying abroad on the FSU Tianjin summer program. Florida State degree-seeking students who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Term Deadline
Spring 2017 September 7, 2016
Spring Break 2017 November 2, 2016
Summer 2017 December 7, 2016
Fall 2017 April 5, 2017

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

For information about study abroad scholarships administered by other FSU departments, view the following links:

Ada Belle Winthrop-King Scholarships

Available through the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics. Contact the department for guidelines.

Audrey Wilson Florence Travel Scholarships

Humanities majors participating in the Florence Program may apply for Audrey Wilson Florence Travel Scholarships. Apply through the director of the FSU humanities program Contact the Program in Interndisciplinary Humanities at 850-644-9121.

Bess Ward Honors Thesis Award

Florida State University liberal studies Honor students and Honors in the Major students may apply for a Bess Ward Honors Travel Scholarship. For more information, see the Honors Program website.

National Science Foundation - Diversity Scholarship (Chiriqui, Panama)

Students applying to the Tropical Behavioral Ecology Program (CQ01-6-17) are eligible to apply for an additional scholarship provided through the NSF. Please follow the link to apply.

The College of Arts & Sciences Study Abroad Scholarship

Available through the College of Arts & Sciences students who meet certain requirements and are attending an FSU International Program (more information available on the scholarship's website).

Scholarship List

General listing of scholarships that may be available for international study. These scholarships are available to both FSU students and Non-FSU students.

Phi Kappa Phi Study Abroad Grant

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi annually awards 100 grants of $1,000 each to selected undergraduate students seeking support for study abroad. The best part is that applicants do NOT have to be a member of Phi Kappa Phi (more information available on the scholarship's website).

GoEuro European Study Abroad Scholarship

GoEuro awards three study abroad scholarships worth up to 2000 euros. For more information, please visit the GoEuro website.

Related Materials

External Links

Study Abroad Loans

Additional Discount Opportunities

Students who have completed 15 or more credit hours on programs administered by the IP office, earning at least a 3.0 average or above in course work at the international location(s), are eligible for discounts for subsequent IP programs. Discounts are $500 for summer sessions or $1,000 for fall or spring semesters. Note: These savings are built into the program fees for First Year Abroad program students.

Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute

The Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute, known as FLORICA, was created in 1986, authorized by the Florida Legislature in 1987, and formalized by an agreement signed by the State University System of Florida, the Florida Community College System and the Council of Rectors of Costa Rican Universities (CONARE). Since its beginning, FLORICA has been administered for Costa Rica by CONARE and on behalf of the State of Florida by The Florida State University and Valencia College, with co-directors appointed from each institution.

FLORICA has strong credibility both in Florida and Costa Rica as a stimulus and a catalyst. The Institute has interfaced broadly in Costa Rica with public and private institutions and agencies including all the public universities.

Costa Rican citizens who have applied and been accepted in a Florida public university or community college may apply for out-of-state tuition waivers through the Florida-Costa Rica Institute Non-Resident Tuition Exemption Program.

Co-Directors

Florida State University
Gisela R. Fisher
Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute
Florida State University
282 Champions Way
University Center Building A,
Office Suite A5500
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420
Phone: 850.644.7217
Fax: 850.644.8817
Email: gfisher@fsu.edu

In Partnership with Valencia College
Rocky Blesso
Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute
Valencia College
P.O. Box 3028
Orlando, FL 32802
Phone: 407.582.5287
Email: hblesso@valenciacollege.com

Florida-France Linkage Institute

The Florida-France Linkage Institute was created by the Legislature of the State of Florida in 1989. Over the years, the scope of activities and outreach of the Institute have grown considerably; in Florida, in France, and in the départments of the French Caribbean. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is administered by The University of South Florida in partnership with Florida State University and Miami-Dade College. The educational mission of each of these institutions lends an unusual and unique diversity to the joint co-sponsorship of the Florida-France Linkage Institute. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is supported on behalf of France by the office of the French Consulate-General in Miami.

The Florida-France Linkage Institute utilizes the resources of the State University System and the Community College System. The Institute also serves as a clearinghouse for inter-institutional and community networking to bring projects and activities to college and university campuses.

Thus, the Florida-France Linkage Institute places a high priority on its mission to serve as a facilitator for international tourism, trade, economic development, and business for the Office of Tourism, Trade and Economic Development (OTTED).

For more information about tuition waivers for the Florida-France Linkage Institute and to apply: http://www.usf.edu/world/centers/florida-france/index.aspx

Co-Directors

University of South Florida
Christine Probes
Florida-France Linkage Institute
International Affairs Center
University of South Florida
4202 E. Fowler Ave., CPR107
Tampa, FL 33620-5550
Phone: (813) 974-3104
Fax: (813) 974-4613
Email: probes@usf.edu

In Partnership with Florida State University
Ceil Bare
Florida-France Linkage Institute
Florida State University
A5500 University Center
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420
Phone: (850) 644-1283
Email: cbare@fsu.edu

In Partnership with Miami-Dade College
Christina Florez
Florida-France Linkage Institute
Miami-Dade College
300 NE 2nd Ave., Room 3116
Miami, FL 33132
Phone: (305) 237-3485
Email: cflorez1@mdc.edu

FSU Fees

Technology Fee (Not Included in Program Fees)

Florida State assesses a technology fee which is NOT included in the International Programs fee. The technology fee rate for 2017-2018 is assessed at $5.25 per credit hour for all students, regardless of location of study.

After registration, the student must pay the applicable technology fee; this fee is paid directly to Florida State University Student Business Services. Failure to pay this fee will result in a late payment charge being assessed to the student by Florida State University Student Business Services. International Programs has no control over the fee or any associated late payment penalty.

Facilities & Equipment Fees (Not Included in Program Fees)

International Programs fees do NOT include Facilities and Equipment Fees, which are assessed each semester for some majors (Medicine, Motion Pictures Arts, Music, Nursing, Fine Arts, Dance, Digital Media Production, etc.) even though you are studying overseas. If you are in one of these colleges/majors, you will be assessed a fee. Details can be found on the Registration Guide, under Fees and Financial Information.

Financial Aid and Financing Study Abroad Workshops

Financial Aid & Financing Study Abroad Workshops will be held at the Askew Student Life Center. See dates and times of workshops below. WALK-INS WELCOME!

  • Tuesday, September 12, 2017
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM in 101A Student Life Center
  • Thursday, September 14, 2017
    1:00 PM - 2:00 PM in 101A Student Life Center
  • Wednesday, September 27, 2017
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM in 101A Student Life Center
  • Tuesday, October 10, 2017
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM in 101A Student Life Center
  • Thursday, October 12, 2017
    1:00 PM - 2:00 PM in 101A Student Life Center
  • Wednesday, October 25, 2017
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM in 101A Student Life Center
  • Tuesday, November 7, 2017
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM in 101A Student Life Center
  • Thursday, November 9, 2017
    1:00 PM - 2:00 PM in 101A Student Life Center
  • Wednesday, November 15, 2017
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM in 101A Student Life Center

Deferment Forms

General Program Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

Application Fee

The $100 application fee is nonrefundable.

Confirmation Deposit

The $1500 confirmation deposit is refundable until the close of business on the deposit’s due date. If an applicant has paid the deposit or been granted a deferred payment plan for the deposit and has not withdrawn from a program as of the close of business on the deposit due date, the applicant becomes fully liable for the confirmation deposit. Students whose offer of admission to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) will not be able to participate but remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit.

Full Program Fee

Program applicants who have demonstrated their intent to participate in the program by payment or by deferral of the confirmation deposit and who have not withdrawn from the program as of the full payment due date become fully liable for the full program fee as of the close of business on the full payment due date.

Refunds of Program Fees

Refunds of program fees WILL BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Cancellation of program by International Programs
  2. Involuntary call to active duty
  3. Death of the student or death in the immediate family (parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, or sibling)

Refunds of program fees will not be granted where a student becomes ineligible to participate in a program for failure to meet or maintain admission requirements.

Partial Refunds of Program Fees

Partial refunds of program fees MAY BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Illness of the student of such duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by Florida State's University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  2. Exceptional circumstances that could not have been foreseen and were beyond the control of the student, as approved by the International Programs’ refund committee.
    • Timely notification in relation to the event that caused the need for withdrawal will be considered in evaluating refund requests. In no instance will a request be considered if it is made after the end of the semester for which the refund is requested.
    • Refunds cannot be granted, under any circumstances, in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun.
    • Applicants who apply and are accepted after the published due dates remain liable for fees in accordance with the published due dates.
  3. Rescission of admission by the Florida State University Office of Admission for failure to meet the conditions of one’s admission. Students whose admission offer to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit

Submitting Withdrawals, Requests for Refunds, and Release from Fee Liability

All withdrawals, requests for refunds, and requests for release from fee liability must be submitted in writing via email to International Programs. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the subject line of the email.

Alternatively, requests can be submitted in writing to International Programs at the following postal address:

Attention: Refund Committee
Office of FSU International Programs
A5500 University Center
282 Champions Way
P.O. Box 3062420
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420

Visa Information

Spain

A visa is required for US Citizens going to Valencia, Spain for the following programs: Fall, Spring, , First Year Abroad and Interns. Please note any program under 90 days in length does not require a visa for U.S. Citizens.

All Spain Participants:

  • Non-US Citizens: It is the responsibility of the non-US Citizen to check with their local consulate to see if a visa is required in order to study abroad in Valencia. If you are a non-US citizen, please contact us at IP-Visas@fsu.edu.
  • Passport: A passport valid for at least 6 months beyond the end of the program is required. The passport must also contain at least 2 empty visa pages. The last three pages of the passport do not count as visa pages.
  • Under 18 Years Old: Additional visa documentation will be required for participants under the age of 18. Please contact International Programs at IP-Visas@fsu.edu if you are under 18.

Spain Participants requiring a visa:

International Programs provides support and guidance for the visa application process. Students will be required to submit their passport in advance of the Valencia Program so the visa can be affixed inside the passport. For this reason, international travel plans may be limited during the months prior to the start of the program. Full visa requirements and instructions on how to apply will be provided in a “Visa Packet”. All visa packets will be emailed to the students. Please take note of the following important visa requirements according to program:

For Spring, Fall, or Interns

  • Financial Support: Proof of financial support in the amount of $2,000 must be supplied in the form of original financial aid award letters, an original recent bank statement, or a notarized letter from the bank from an account either in the student’s or parents’ names. The funds must be shown from a "liquid account"; checking or savings only. More information will be supplied in the visa packet.

For First Year Abroad Students ONLY:

  • FBI Background Check: All students are requiredto obtain a recent FBI background check. Do not start the background check until prompted. More information will be supplied in the visa packet.
  • Financial Support: Proof of financial support in the amount of $6,000 must be supplied in the form of financial aid award letters or a recent bank statement from the student or their parents/legal guardians. The funds must be shown from a “liquid account”; checking or savings only. More information will be supplied in the visa packet.

Important Dates & Documents

Spring 2018
Early Application Deadline*September 06, 2017$ 100.00
Scholarship Application DeadlineSeptember 06, 2017
Confirmation Deposit DueSeptember 20, 2017$ 1500.00
Important Forms DueSeptember 20, 2017
Full Payment DueOctober 18, 2017
Orientation MeetingTBA

* Application fees are non-refundable. After the deadline has passed, applications will be accepted on a space available basis.

Summer 2018
Early Application Deadline*December 06, 2017$ 100.00
Scholarship Application DeadlineDecember 06, 2017
Confirmation Deposit DueJanuary 24, 2018$ 1500.00
Important Forms DueJanuary 24, 2018
Full Payment DueFebruary 21, 2018
Orientation MeetingTBA

* Application fees are non-refundable. After the deadline has passed, applications will be accepted on a space available basis.

Fall 2018
Early Application Deadline*April 04, 2018$ 100.00
Scholarship Application DeadlineApril 04, 2018
Confirmation Deposit DeadlineMay 16, 2018$ 1500.00
Important Forms DueMay 16, 2018
Full Payment DueJune 13, 2018
Orientation MeetingTBA

* Application fees are non-refundable. After the deadline has passed, applications will be accepted on a space available basis.

Spring 2019
Early Application Deadline*September 12, 2018$ 100.00
Scholarship Application DeadlineSeptember 12, 2018
Confirmation Deposit DueSeptember 26, 2018$ 1500.00
Important Forms DueSeptember 26, 2018
Full Payment DueOctober 24, 2018
Orientation MeetingTBA

* Application fees are non-refundable. After the deadline has passed, applications will be accepted on a space available basis.

Documents

Health & Safety

For sixty years, Florida State University's International Programs has been committed to providing a rewarding academic and cultural experience that enriches the lives of our students. Our highest priority is and always has been the welfare and security of our students.

Program directors maintain contact with our Tallahassee office, local authorities, and United States officials, both at home and abroad. Each program holds meetings with students in which safety procedures and precautions are detailed and regularly re-emphasized. Each program has an Emergency Plan which includes details about local health care facilities, meeting points and procedures, and contingency plans and funds should it ever become necessary to evacuate our students.

Students are reminded to inform International Programs of the details of their independent travel details via our online travel form, heed US State Department travel advisories, and take relevant emergency and US Embassy/Consulate contact information with them.

Students venture abroad to experience other cultures, and to gain a deeper appreciation of their role as American citizens in the world. FSU International Programs is fully committed to helping students realize these aspirations in a safe and secure learning environment.

Insurance

Travel Insurance Information

FSU International Programs encourages program participants to consider purchasing travel insurance. Travel insurance comes in many forms and can protect you in case you need to change your travel plans due to unforeseen circumstances. The coverage ranges from help with lost baggage to delay in flight plans to trip cancellation.

Travel insurance that covers fees associated with changing your airfare plans is especially helpful for those attending programs that require entry or student visas. Immigration approval can take months with regulations changing often that can cause the need to delay or cancel flight plans. Often airfare arrangements are non-refundable or cannot be changed without fee penalties. Certain types of trip cancellation insurance will reimburse you the cost of your airfare or penalty fees. Travel Insurance must cover failure to obtain visa.

You may wish to begin researching travel insurance and trip cancellation policies by using the Travel Insurance Review website. Their Travel Insurance 101: The Complete Guide to Travel Insurance section is particularly helpful for those just beginning their research. They also have a section that allows you to compare different policies.

Travel Resources

University Policies & Resources

Clery Act

In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Florida State University study center safety guides include institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, and other matters. The report also contains statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain off campus buildings or property owned or controlled by The Florida State University; and on public property within or immediately adjacent and accessible from the campus. A paper copy is available upon request to FSU International Programs at A5500 University Center, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420, or by contacting FSU International Programs at (850) 644-3272 or (800) 374-8581.

Copies are also available from the study center administrative offices or you may download from the links below: