Broad Curriculum Program | Panama City, Republic of Panama

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The FSU Panama broad curriculum program gives you the opportunity to study a variety of disciplines while experiencing modern Panama City, historic districts, nearby beaches, and lush tropical regions.

The historic sites, dynamic business environment, and unspoiled terrain yield a wide variety of specialized excursions – which are included in the program fee – extending learning far beyond the classroom. Past excursions have included exploring the engineering marvels of the Panama Canal, touring Panama City’s colonial, old, and cosmopolitan areas, and visiting indigenous communities and their freshwater rapids. Learn about the culture, dances, food, handicrafts, and customs of Panama while living in Panama City. Opportunities for personal travel are provided throughout the program, giving you the freedom to explore on your own.

The FSU Panama calendar is dependent upon the FSU main campus calendar. Program dates are subject to change. Admitted FSU Panama program participants should not purchase a plane ticket for their program until instructed by International Programs to do so.

Program Description

COVID-19

Due to the uncertain nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, all program elements are subject to modification at any time in order to comply with host country restrictions as well as the policies and practices of Florida State University. Examples of possible impacts include but are not limited to:

    ▪  Limitations on independent travel within or between countries
    ▪  Possible quarantine upon arrival or due to positive test/close contact
    ▪  FSU expects students to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 (see FAQs for more info)
    ▪  COVID-19 testing before/during the program
    ▪  Host country restrictions related to masks, curfews, contact tracing, etc.
    ▪  Program date and/or social cultural calendar modifications
    ▪  Other impacts as detailed in the COVID-19 FAQs

IP staff will review local guidance or restrictions with participants during pre-departure and on-site orientations, but participants are also expected to remain informed of the guidance and restrictions in place for their program location before and after applying as host country authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend restrictions in the time between your application and departure.

Program Sessions

Do not purchase airline tickets until advised to do so by International Programs.

CodeTermStart DateEnd DateFeeApply
PN04Fall 202108/18/2112/11/21$12,795.00Closed
PN05Spring 202201/03/2204/30/22$12,795.00Closed
PN03Summer 202205/04/2207/30/22$13,440.00
PN04Fall 202208/17/2212/10/22$13,835.00Applications open January 05, 2022.
PN05Spring 202301/05/2305/06/23$13,835.00Applications open April 06, 2022.

Eligibility

This program is open to all interested students.

Study Center

Situated within the City of Knowledge, FSU Panama offers the amenities of a full campus. With students studying from all over Latin America and the Caribbean, there is a unique opportunity to meet students from a variety of diverse backgrounds. The City of Knowledge offers amenities such as a food court, swimming pool, basketball court, gym, and more. FSU Panama features classrooms, study spaces, science labs, as well as a library and a bookstore. The student lounge & terrace on the top floor provide views of the Panama Canal and offer the perfect opportunity to spend time with friends while enjoying an empanada from the newly renovated café. On-site security ensures student safety is the top priority. 

Housing

The housing on these programs is in a dormitory-style residence within the City of Knowledge complex. Located just a short walk or shuttle ride away from FSU Panama, each room is equipped with air conditioning, Wi-Fi, a TV, a mini-fridge, study-space, and balcony. On their floor, students have access to a kitchenette with a microwave, coffee maker, and refrigerator. Fingerprint entry grants students access to a fully equipped kitchen, coin-operated laundry room, vending machines, and student lounge on the main floor. Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. For a list of hotels near the campus, please click here.

Excursions & Group Activities

Group activities and excursions vary per session and may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities. Cultural immersion and social events planned for this program may include the following.

  • Overnight Excursions

    Bocas del Toro, Achotines tuna fish research laboratory, liquor distillery, turtle hatching expedition, highlands of Panama with visit to coffee plantation processing plant, San Blas Islands

  • Day Excursions

    Indigenous communities of Embera People, countryside excursion, certified agro-touristic farm, Taboga/Contadora Islands, Portobelo/San Lorenzo fortress, Isla Grande, Saboga Island, Viveros Island, Playa Blanca and Pollera Conga festival, Diablos and Congos festival, Jungle safari tour with beach and zoo visit, deep-sea fishing, snorkeling, and surfing

  • Panama City Excursions

    Panama Canal Visitor Center, Colonial/Old/Cosmopolitan Area visits, Colón Free Zone, Eco-Canal tour, eco-tourism and hiking

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • Instructional costs for 16 credit hours
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Some breakfast items
  • Two pizza nights and two group dinners
  • Program-planned excursions/group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • 24/7 student support
  • Health insurance
  • Scheduled group airport pick-up
  • IP welcome pack

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., per credit hour technology fee)
  • Course-related fees (e.g., theatre tickets)

Courses

To speak with an International Programs Academic Advisor about study abroad courses, you can make an appointment using Campus Connect (FSU students only), or contact our advisors directly (Sarah Lovins Bacani at slovins@fsu.edu or Mary Melton at mmelton@fsu.edu) to make an appointment.

IP provides Liberal Studies requirement areas in an effort to help students make informed decisions. Although every attempt is made to be accurate & current, requirement areas are fluid and it is the student’s responsibility to confirm all Liberal Studies requirement areas through the Liberal Studies Course Search Tool and your major advisor.

Session PN04Fall 2021
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ACG2021Introduction to Financial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to financial accounting concepts, placing emphasis on financial statements and how they reflect business transactions. Please note, Accounting Majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
ACG2071Introduction to Managerial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to managerial accounting concepts. Please note, Accounting majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
AMH2020A History of the United States Since 1977

This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.
3
BSC1005General Biology For Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology For Non-Majors Laboratory

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications For Business/Economics

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CGS2518Spreadsheets for Business

This course provides an in-depth study of spreadsheets utilizing a problem-solving approach. Spreadsheet-based solutions are explored for common business tasks and problems. The course presents a thorough coverage of spreadsheet functions and tools, along with a deep understanding of their purpose in a business environment. The course is ideal for students with professional interests related to business and economics, as well as for students wishing to obtain a deeper understanding of spreadsheets in general.
3
CHM1020Chemistry for Liberal Studies (Online)

This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. The course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit not allowed for CHM 1020 after taking CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.
3
CHM1020LChemistry for Liberal Studies Laboratory (Online)

This laboratory emphasizes major topics from CHM 1020 relating chemistry concepts and techniques to everyday life experiences. This laboratory-based course meets two hours a week. No credit allowed after taking CHM 1045.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CHM1046General Chemistry II

This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
3
CHM1046LGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
1
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
GEA1000World Geography

This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.
3
GEO1330Environmental Science

This course explores the causes of local and global environmental problems and their impacts, including resource use, pollution, ecosystems, and population growth.
3
GEO2200cPhysical Geography

This course is an overview of earth-sun relations, weather, climate, landforms, water systems, soils, and vegetation.
3
GEO4340Living in a Hazardous Environment

This course explores types of environmental hazards (natural and human-made) and their effects, techniques for the analysis of risks, and strategies for recovering losses.
3
GIS4043Geographic Information Systems

This course is a survey of GIS topics, including locational control, spatial data structures, modeling and analysis, and future trends in decision support, sensors, and geographic methods.
3
GLY1030Environmental Issues in Geology

This course examines environmental issues as they relate to geological phenomena, which include volcanic and earthquake hazards, resource and land-use planning, air and water pollution, waste disposal, glaciation and sea-level change, landslides, flooding, shoreline erosion, and global change issues. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1000 or 2010C. Credit can be received for taking GLY 1000L.
3
IDS2060Global Engagement (Online)

This course gives students the opportunity to study a different country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with their own through actively participating in cultural experiences.
1
IDS2316World Without God

This course examines three main questions: (1) Can we explain the existence of our earth, and the universe as a while, without recourse to God? (2) Can there be an objective moral code that we all have good reason to follow even if there is no God? (3) Can we have a spiritual or religious attitude to the world in the absence of belief in God?
3
IDS2375Third World Cinema

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
IDS2651Language: Body, Mind, and World

This course provides an examination of language from biological, psychological, and social perspectives, and considers ways that our knowledge of language can be deployed to tackle real-world issues in areas such as health, law, and education.
3
INR2002Introduction To International Relations

This course introduces students to the study of international relations. Major topics include the different actors that participate in international relations and the different goals they pursue, the processes of conflict and cooperation, and recent trends in international politics.
3
INR4075International Human Rights

This course introduces the student to the philosophical and legal foundations of the international human rights regime, and explores the development of norms and institutions with special emphasis on the post-World War II era.
3
INS3003Introduction to International Affairs

This course introduces students to the core questions and concerns of international affairs. The course surveys the many distinct academic disciplines that together contribute to the development of an interdisciplinary understanding of the international system. The course also examines how each of these disciplines understands the international system, the questions it raises, and its strengths and weaknesses. In addition, the course provides an introduction to many of the global issues of interest to international affairs majors, including terrorism, democracy, and globalization. At the end of this course, students have the skills and knowledge required to construct their own specialized plan of study in international affairs.
3
LAH1093Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History

This course is a cross-cultural history of Latin America focusing on women, Native Americans, African-Americans, mestizos, and mulattoes in historical context. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.
3
LAH4470History of the Caribbean

This course focuses on Cuba, Puerto Rico, and other Caribbean societies. European and United States colonialism and local Caribbean forces are studied to help understand the area's social, economic, and political problems and prospects.
3
LIT2000Introduction to Literature

This course introduces students to key terminology, concepts, and methodologies for the study of complex literature. The course provides a groundwork in literary types for non-majors and is also strongly recommended as preparation for upper-level (3000- or 4000-level) coursework in the field.
3
LIT3024Perspectives on the Short Story

This course introduces students to the critical reading of short stories dating from the nineteenth through the twenty-first century. This course teaches students to identify tone, narration, form, theme, characterization, and other formal aspects of short fiction. Students are encouraged to formulate their own interpretation of the works read, based on their developing ability to recognize the decisions each author has made in constructing the text.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
3
MAC2233Calculus For Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAC2311Calculus With Analytic Geometry I

This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAC2312Calculus With Analytic Geometry II

This course covers techniques of integration; applications of integration; series and Taylor series; differential equations. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAC2313Calculus With Analytic Geometry III

This course covers functions of several variables and their graphical representations; vectors; partial derivatives and gradients; optimization; multiple integration; polar, spherical, and cylindrical coordinate systems; curves; vector fields; line integrals; flux integrals; divergence theorem and Stokes' theorem. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
5
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MGF1106Math for Liberal Studies

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
PHI2010Introduction to Philosophy

This course introduces some of the central problems in philosophy. Students also learn how to construct and criticize arguments and develop their own philosophical positions.
3
PHY2048CGeneral Physics A

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how and why things move. Topics covered include kinematics, forces, energy, momentum, oscillations, and thermodynamics. The course is intended for physical science majors and engineers and to be taken as a sequence with General Physics B (PHY 2049C) and Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101). Completing Modern Physics entitles students to a minor in physics. Calculus is used in this course.
5
PHY2049CGeneral Physics B

This course is an introduction to electricity, magnetism, and optics for physical science majors. Calculus is used. Course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory.
5
PPE3003Psychology of Personality

This course is an introduction to methods, theory, and research in personality.
3
PSB2000Introduction to Brain and Behavior

This course helps students understand basic nervous system mechanisms that underlie behavior and how systematic observation and experimentation are involved in constructing our understanding of these mechanisms. The course also conveys an appreciation for utilizing critical thinking and scientific knowledge when making important decisions. (Cannot be taken after PSB 3004C.)
3
PSY2012General Psychology

This course is a broad overview covering important psychological principles and findings within the major subfields of psychology, and the basic scientific methods employed. A "bio-psycho-social" approach is emphasized throughout so that all behaviors (including how we think, feel, and act) are discussed in terms of biological, psychological, and social determinants and consequences.
3
REL1300Introduction to World Religions

This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.
3
REL3145Gender and Religion

This course considers the impact of gender on religion. Includes cross-cultural studies, theoretical works, and gender issues within religious traditions.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
STA2023Fundamental Business Statistics

This course covers statistical applications in business, involving graphical and numerical descriptions of data, data collection, correlation and simple linear regression, elementary probability, random variables, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for a single sample.
3
WOH1023The Modern World to 1815

This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents of the modern world from the end of the Middle Ages to 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1023. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
WOH1030The Modern World Since 1815

This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents in the modern world since 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1030. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
Session PN05Spring 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ACG2021Introduction to Financial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to financial accounting concepts, placing emphasis on financial statements and how they reflect business transactions. Please note, Accounting Majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
ACG2071Introduction to Managerial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to managerial accounting concepts. Please note, Accounting majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
AMH2020A History of the United States Since 1977

This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.
3
BSC1005General Biology for Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology for Non-Majors Laboratory

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
BSC2011Biological Science II

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
BSC2011LBiological Science II Laboratory

This course focuses on reproduction and development, transmission (Mendelian) genetics, population biology, ecology, and evolution.
1
CCJ3011Criminology

This course offers an examination of the field of criminology, including its theories, basic assumptions, and definitions.
3
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CGS2518Spreadsheets for Business

This course provides an in-depth study of spreadsheets utilizing a problem-solving approach. Spreadsheet-based solutions are explored for common business tasks and problems. The course presents a thorough coverage of spreadsheet functions and tools, along with a deep understanding of their purpose in a business environment. The course is ideal for students with professional interests related to business and economics, as well as for students wishing to obtain a deeper understanding of spreadsheets in general.
3
CHM1020Chemistry for Liberal Studies (Online)

This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. The course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit not allowed for CHM 1020 after taking CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.
3
CHM1020LChemistry for Liberal Studies Laboratory (Online)

This laboratory emphasizes major topics from CHM 1020 relating chemistry concepts and techniques to everyday life experiences. This laboratory-based course meets two hours a week. No credit allowed after taking CHM 1045.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CHM1046General Chemistry II

This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
3
CHM1046LGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
1
CLP4143Abnormal Psychology

This course focuses on the causes of personality disorganization, diagnosisand treatment of mental illness, and developments in experimental psychopathology.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
GEA1000World Geography

This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.
3
GEO1330Environmental Science

This course explores the causes of local and global environmental problems and their impacts, including resource use, pollution, ecosystems, and population growth.
3
GEO2200cPhysical Geography

This course is an overview of earth-sun relations, weather, climate, landforms, water systems, soils, and vegetation.
3
GEO4357Environmental Conflict And Economic Development

This course examines controversies over the use, transformation, and destruction of nature, including political ecology.
3
GLY1030Environmental Issues in Geology

This course examines environmental issues as they relate to geological phenomena, which include volcanic and earthquake hazards, resource and land-use planning, air and water pollution, waste disposal, glaciation and sea-level change, landslides, flooding, shoreline erosion, and global change issues. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1000 or 2010C. Credit can be received for taking GLY 1000L.
3
IDS2335Central American Cinema

This course gives an overview of Central American Cinema and provides the student with an opportunity to understand and apply basic film analysis tools as well as to understand the socio-political and cultural contexts under which films from six different countries of the region were produced. This course is taught in English.
3
IDS2651Language: Body, Mind, and World

This course provides an examination of language from biological, psychological, and social perspectives, and considers ways that our knowledge of language can be deployed to tackle real-world issues in areas such as health, law, and education.
3
IDS3317Demons, the Antichrist, and Satan

This course examines traditions regarding demons, the Antichrist and Satan in the Bible, Judaism and Christianity. Biblical and ancient non-biblical texts that describe these figures are examined in their historical contexts. Traditions regarding Satan and other evil personages are traced historically so that students have a sense of how an understanding of these figures changed over time.
3
INR2002Introduction to International Relations

This course introduces students to the study of international relations. Major topics include the different actors that participate in international relations and the different goals they pursue, the processes of conflict and cooperation, and recent trends in international politics.
3
INR4083International Conflict

This course examines historical patterns in warfare, and considers the conditions that influence war and peace between nation-states. Topics include causes of war, outcomes and aftermath of war, and approaches to peace.
3
INS3003Introduction to International Affairs

This course introduces students to the core questions and concerns of international affairs. The course surveys the many distinct academic disciplines that together contribute to the development of an interdisciplinary understanding of the international system. The course also examines how each of these disciplines understands the international system, the questions it raises, and its strengths and weaknesses. In addition, the course provides an introduction to many of the global issues of interest to international affairs majors, including terrorism, democracy, and globalization. At the end of this course, students have the skills and knowledge required to construct their own specialized plan of study in international affairs.
3
LAH1093Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History

This course is a cross-cultural history of Latin America focusing on women, Native Americans, African-Americans, mestizos, and mulattoes in historical context. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.
3
LAH3500History of South America

This course is an introductory survey from the Inca Civilization to modern Chile, Peru, Argentina, etc. Emphasis is placed on the contrasts and conflicts between Indian and European culture and on basic social, economic, and political evolution. The persistence of "underdevelopment" and poverty are also explored.
3
LIT2000Introduction to Literature

This course introduces students to key terminology, concepts, and methodologies for the study of complex literature. The course provides a groundwork in literary types for non-majors and is also strongly recommended as preparation for upper-level (3000- or 4000-level) coursework in the field.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
3
MAC1140Pre-Calculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAC2311Calculus With Analytic Geometry I

This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAC2312Calculus With Analytic Geometry II

This course covers techniques of integration; applications of integration; series and Taylor series; differential equations. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAC2313Calculus With Analytic Geometry III

This course covers functions of several variables and their graphical representations; vectors; partial derivatives and gradients; optimization; multiple integration; polar, spherical, and cylindrical coordinate systems; curves; vector fields; line integrals; flux integrals; divergence theorem and Stokes' theorem. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
5
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MGF1106Math for Liberal Studies

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
MGF1107Practical Finite Math

This course has a recommended background of two years of high school algebra. Topics include financial mathematics; linear and exponential growth; numbers and number systems; history of mathematics; elementary number theory; voting techniques; graph theory; game theory; geometry; and computer applications.
3
PHI2010Introduction to Philosophy

This course introduces some of the central problems in philosophy. Students also learn how to construct and criticize arguments and develop their own philosophical positions.
3
PHM2300Introduction to Political Philosophy

This course introduces students to the main issues in political philosophy: the justification of political authority, role of law, political obligation, neocolonialism, disobedience, revolution, rights, the appropriate ends of government, patterns of distribution and justice.
3
PHY2048CGeneral Physics A

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how and why things move. Topics covered include kinematics, forces, energy, momentum, oscillations, and thermodynamics. The course is intended for physical science majors and engineers and to be taken as a sequence with General Physics B (PHY 2049C) and Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101). Completing Modern Physics entitles students to a minor in physics. Calculus is used in this course.
5
PHY2049CGeneral Physics B

This course is an introduction to electricity, magnetism, and optics for physical science majors. Calculus is used. Course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory.
5
PSB2000Introduction to Brain and Behavior

This course helps students understand basic nervous system mechanisms that underlie behavior and how systematic observation and experimentation are involved in constructing our understanding of these mechanisms. The course also conveys an appreciation for utilizing critical thinking and scientific knowledge when making important decisions. (Cannot be taken after PSB 3004C.)
3
PSY2012General Psychology

This course is a broad overview covering important psychological principles and findings within the major subfields of psychology, and the basic scientific methods employed. A "bio-psycho-social" approach is emphasized throughout so that all behaviors (including how we think, feel, and act) are discussed in terms of biological, psychological, and social determinants and consequences.
3
QMB3200Quantitative Methods for Business Decisions

This course examines classical and modern decision-making techniques based on probabilistic concepts. Emphasizes applications to all areas of business.
3
REL1300Introduction to World Religions

This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.
3
REL2240Introduction to the New Testament

This course introduces students to the writings of the New Testament in the context of the historical development of early Christianity.
3
SPC1017Fundamentals of Speech

This course provides a survey and application of communication theory, including interpersonal communication, small group communication, and public speaking.
3
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
STA2023Fundamental Business Statistics

This course covers statistical applications in business, involving graphical and numerical descriptions of data, data collection, correlation and simple linear regression, elementary probability, random variables, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for a single sample.
3
SYG2010Social Problems

This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society, which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.
3
WOH1023The Modern World to 1915

This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents of the modern world from the end of the Middle Ages to 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1023. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
Session PN03Summer 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
FIN3244Financial Markets, Institutions, and International Finance Systems

This course focuses on money and capital markets, financial institutions, financial systems, and financial environment including an introduction to investments. Emphasizes the microfinancial decision-making process of the business firm.
3
FIN3403Financial Management of the Firm

This course is an examination of the basic concepts involved in the investment, financing, and dividend decisions of the business firm. Managerial orientation with emphasis on identification, analysis, and solution of financial problems confronting the firm.
3

*/**/***/****/^ Courses followed by these symbols denote cross listing. Students may take one or the other, but not both.

Money Matters

The biggest factor in deciding when and where to study abroad is often the financial aspect. In fact, too many students assume they cannot afford to participate, missing out on an invaluable opportunity because they are not aware of alternative methods of funding. The Finances Team at International Programs is dedicated to helping students through the financial aid application process by conducting financial aid workshops on a regular basis in addition to meeting personally with students in need of assistance. We also help concerned parents! Additionally, non-FSU students are strongly encouraged to contact the financial aid office at their home school as early as possible. Finally, FSU students will find additional helpful information on the FSU Financial Aid website.

Please review Understanding the Financial Aid Process for Students Studying Abroad to explore a range of issues for students who anticipate receiving any type of financial assistance. This is a document just for FSU IP students and families, with step-by-step guidance for the process. FSU students, access it here. Non-FSU students, access it here. For summer financial aid, please keep in mind a student must be enrolled in at least 6 hours in order to receive aid.

For information about the 1098-T form, click here.

To make a payment, click here.

Any student receiving any form of assistance below will want to complete a Fee Deferment to allow International Programs to delay the due date of the associated program fees. More information about the Fee Deferment is included in the step-by-step guidance at the link above.

Florida Bright Futures

Florida Bright Futures scholarship funds may be used toward a semester abroad. The Bright Futures Academic Scholarship and Medallion Scholarships will be available for all terms.

The Florida Department of Education website contains additional information concerning eligibility, renewal criteria, appeal processes and legislative updates.

Credit Hours Bright Futures Academic
$213.55 Per Credit Hour
Bright Futures Medallion
$160.16 Per Credit Hour
6 $1281.30 $960.96
7 $1494.85 $1121.12
8 $1708.40 $1281.28
9 $1921.95 $1441.44
10 $2135.50 $1601.60
11 $2349.05 $1761.76
12 $2562.60 $1921.92
13 $2776.15 $2082.08
14 $2989.70 $2242.24
15 $3203.25 $2402.40
16 $3416.80 $2562.56
17 $3630.35 $2722.72
18 $3843.90 $2882.88

Quick Links

Florida Prepaid

Florida Prepaid (FPP) tuition and local fees and/or dorm benefits may be used to pay International Programs fees.

To use a Florida Prepaid dorm account during the summer term, the purchaser of the Prepaid account must contact Florida Prepaid and complete the steps required to authorize use of the summer dorm plan for studying abroad. All other plans will be billed by FSU without additional authorization.

Contact Florida Prepaid directly at 1-800-552-4723 or access their requirements online at https://www.myfloridaprepaid.com/resources/forms/.

Note: Eligibility for summer financial aid requires enrollment in at least six credits.

How much is my Florida Prepaid worth if I study abroad?

# of Credits Enrolled FPP Tuition FPP Local Fees* Dorm Rate
1 $115.08 $34.73 $3890.00
2 $230.16 $69.46 Per Term**
3 $345.24 $104.19
4 $460.32 $138.92
5 $575.40 $173.65
6 $690.48 $208.38
7 $805.56 $243.11
8 $920.64 $277.84
9 $1035.72 $312.57
10 $1150.80 $347.30
11 $1265.88 $382.03
12 $1380.96 $416.76
13 $1496.04 $451.49
14 $1611.12 $486.22
15 $1726.20 $520.95
  • * Please note the above tuition and fees are subject to change at any time.
  • ** Contact FPP for authorization instructions to use dorm account during a summer term: 850-309-1660 ext. 4134

Quick Links

International Programs Scholarship Opportunities

International Programs strives to award an average of $200,000 in scholarships annually to about 100 students.

Current FSU students who have been admitted to an international program can apply to IP scholarships through the FS4U portal (link below). Before applying, students should review the list of available scholarship opportunities as well as the application process instructions.

Please note: IP scholarships are not available to in-state/out-of-state students currently on the First Year Abroad (FYA) program or First Semester Abroad (FSA) program or those who are directly enrolled at FSU Panama. Some scholarships may have additional eligibility criteria in addition to what is listed below. Please reference the Scholarship Application Instructions for complete details.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Program Start Date Scholarship Open Date Scholarship Application Deadline Scholarship Award Decisions Communicated to Applicants
Spring 2022 June 9, 2021 September 8, 2021 Prior to September 22, 2021
Summer 2022 November 8, 2021 January 5, 2022 Prior to January 12, 2022
Fall 2022 January 14, 2022 April 27, 2022 Prior to May 18, 2022

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

Other departments at FSU also offer their own study abroad scholarship opportunities. You can review the list of scholarships administered by other FSU departments by following the link below.

As a member of the Generation Study Abroad campaign sponsored by the Institute for International Education, Florida State University is committed to the goal of doubling the number of our study abroad participants by 2020. As part of this commitment, International Programs awards an average of $200,000 in scholarships annually to about 100 students.

Current FSU students who have been admitted to an International Program can apply to IP scholarships through the FS4U portal (link below). Before applying, you should review the list of available scholarship opportunities as well as the application process instructions.

Please note: IP scholarships are not available to in-state/out-of-state students currently on the First Year Abroad (FYA) program or First Semester Abroad (FSA) program or those who are directly enrolled at FSU-Panama. Some scholarships may have additional eligibility criteria in addition to what is listed below. Please reference the Scholarship Application Instructions for complete details.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Program Start Date Scholarship Open Date Scholarship Application Deadline Scholarship Award Decisions Communicated to Applicants
Spring Break 2020 September 4, 2019 October 23, 2019 Prior to November 6, 2019

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

Other departments at FSU also offer their own study abroad scholarship opportunities. You can review the list of scholarships administered by other FSU departments by following the link below.

Other Scholarship Opportunities

Follow the link below for a general listing of  scholarships that may be available for international study. These scholarships are available to both FSU students and non-FSU students.

Related Materials

External Links

Study Abroad Loans

Additional Discount or Savings Opportunities

Multi-Term Discount

Students who have completed 15 or more credit hours on programs administered by the International Programs office, earning at least a 3.0 average or above in their course work at an international location(s), are eligible for a discount for subsequent IP program. The discount is $500 for summer session or $1,000 for fall or spring semester. Note: This discount is built into the program fees for First Year Abroad program students.

Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute

The Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute, known as FLORICA, was created in 1986, authorized by the Florida Legislature in 1987, and formalized by an agreement signed by the State University System of Florida, the Florida Community College System and the Council of Rectors of Costa Rican Universities (CONARE). Since its beginning, FLORICA has been administered for Costa Rica by CONARE and on behalf of the State of Florida by The Florida State University and Valencia College, with co-directors appointed from each institution.

FLORICA has strong credibility both in Florida and Costa Rica as a stimulus and a catalyst. The Institute has interfaced broadly in Costa Rica with public and private institutions and agencies including all the public universities.

Costa Rican citizens who have applied and been accepted in a Florida public university or community college may apply for out-of-state tuition waivers through the Florida-Costa Rica Institute Non-Resident Tuition Exemption Program.

Co-Directors

Florida State University
Florida State University
282 Champions Way
University Center Building A
Office Suite A5500
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420
Phone: 850.644.3272
Fax: 850.644.8817
Email: Linkage-FLCR@fsu.edu

In Partnership with Valencia College
Ariel Ortiz
Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute
Phone: 407.299.5000
Email: aortiz167@valenciacollege.edu

Florida-France Linkage Institute

The Florida-France Linkage Institute was created by the Legislature of the State of Florida in 1989. Over the years, the scope of activities and outreach of the Institute have grown considerably; in Florida, in France, and in the départments of the French Caribbean. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is administered by The University of South Florida in partnership with Florida State University and Miami-Dade College. The educational mission of each of these institutions lends an unusual and unique diversity to the joint co-sponsorship of the Florida-France Linkage Institute. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is supported on behalf of France by the office of the French Consulate-General in Miami.

The Florida-France Linkage Institute utilizes the resources of the State University System and the Community College System. The Institute also serves as a clearinghouse for inter-institutional and community networking to bring projects and activities to college and university campuses.

Thus, the Florida-France Linkage Institute places a high priority on its mission to serve as a facilitator for international tourism, trade, economic development, and business for the Office of Tourism, Trade and Economic Development (OTTED).

For more information about tuition waivers for the Florida-France Linkage Institute and to apply, visit the Florida France Institute Information and Application webpage.

Co-Directors

University of South Florida
Dr. Alexxis Avalon
Florida-France Linkage Institute
USF World
4202 E. Fowler Ave., CGS 101
Tampa, FL 33620
Email: ffli@usf.edu
Phone: (813) 974-5313
Fax: (813) 974-8271

If you have any questions regarding the application process, please feel free to contact Dr. Avalon by phone or by the email listed above.

In Partnership with Florida State University
To be announced

In Partnership with Miami-Dade College
To be announced

FSU Fees

Technology Fee (Not Included in Program Fees)

Florida State assesses a technology fee which is NOT included in the International Programs fee. The technology fee rate for 2021-2022 is assessed at $5.25 per credit hour for all students, regardless of location of study.

After registration, the student must pay the applicable technology fee; this fee is paid directly to Florida State University Student Business Services. Failure to pay this fee will result in a late payment charge being assessed to the student by Florida State University Student Business Services. International Programs has no control over the fee or any associated late payment penalty.

Facilities & Equipment Fees (Not Included in Program Fees)

International Programs fees do NOT include Facilities and Equipment Fees, which are assessed each semester for some majors (Medicine, Motion Pictures Arts, Music, Nursing, Fine Arts, Dance, Digital Media Production, etc.) even though you are studying overseas. If you are in one of these colleges/majors, you will be assessed a fee. Details can be found on the Registration Guide, under 'Fees and Financial Information.'

Financial Aid Info Sessions

The world is within your reach! Talk with a member of IP's Finances Team to learn how your financial aid can help you have a study abroad experience of a lifetime!

Join us for a virtual information session, register below! Or request a meeting by contacting IP-FinancialAid@fsu.edu. Be sure to follow us on social media @fsuip for updates.

  1. Tuesday, September 21st | 1-2 PM
    Register Here: https://fsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAqfuGqrT0tEtN-kjYMhgc6nELYVuC_ZNBS
  2. Wednesday, October 6th | 11am-12 PM
    Register Here: https://fsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMlceGorD4vGNebr7M2AP1KHsmd7QO-5Z0N
  3. Thursday, October 21st | 4-5 PM
    Register Here: https://fsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEsceypqDsuEtNg8C_i2AG1Q9sMZOtNu_JU
  4. Wednesday, November 10th | 3-4 PM
    Register Here: https://fsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIkdOqrrT4sEtCxHX18GAbflNaZdKz7ixZq

Deferment Forms

The online fee deferment is located in the International Programs Student Portal under the Money Matters area. Login here to access the portal.

General Program Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

APPLICATION FEE

All study abroad applicants are required to submit a non-refundable, non-transferrable application fee in order to have their application reviewed by International Programs. Paying the application fee does not guarantee admission to a program. Application fee amounts vary by program.

COMMITMENT FEE

Once admitted to a study abroad program, a nonrefundable commitment fee is required to confirm your participation in the program. Commitment fee amounts vary by program. FSU Applicants expecting to receive financial aid including scholarships, grants, and other sources of assistance have the option to submit a legally binding fee deferment for all or part of the commitment fee, with payment of the balance, if any. Non-FSU Students may not defer the commitment fee.

Applicants are liable for the commitment fee on the commitment fee payment due date.

COMMITMENT FEE PAYMENT DEADLINE

Admitted applicants who have not paid or deferred the non-refundable commitment fee in full by the published commitment fee payment deadline will be ineligible to participate in the program (i.e. International Programs will change the student's status to cancelled and the student will have no further fee liability). Applicants who apply to a program after the regular commitment fee payment deadline has passed must pay or defer the entire commitment fee to be eligible for admittance to a program.

FULL PROGRAM FEE

All admitted applicants must pay or defer the full program fee in accordance with the published full payment date in order to avoid being canceled from the program.

  • Admitted applicants who have submitted a written request to cancel from the program by close of business on the full program fee payment due date will be held liable for the commitment fee but not the full program fee.
  • Admitted applicants who have not paid or deferred in full and who have not submitted a written request to cancel from the program as of the close of business on the full program fee payment due date will be cancelled from the program and will remain liable for the commitment fee previously paid or deferred.
  • Fully paid or deferred admitted applicants who have submitted a written request to cancel from the program after close of business on the full program fee payment due date will remain liabile for the full program fee.

SUBMITTING CANCELLATIONS AND REFUND/RELEASE FROM FEE LIABILITY REQUESTS

Submit all cancellations and requests for refunds or release from fee liability in writing via email to IP-Cancel@fsu.edu. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the subject line of the email.

Alternatively, requests may be submitted in writing to International Programs at the following postal address:

Attention: Refund Committee
Office of FSU International Programs
A5500 University Center
282 Champions Way
P.O. Box 3062420
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420

REFUNDS / RELEASE OF LIABILITY OF PROGRAM FEES

Refunds of program fees/release of liability for program fees will be granted for student cancellations prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances, upon providing appropriate documentation:

  • Involuntary call to active duty
  • Death of the student or a death in the immediate family (parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, or sibling)

PARTIAL REFUNDS / RELEASE OF LIABILITY OF PROGRAM FEES

Partial refunds/partial release of fee liability for program fees may be granted in instances of student withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances, upon providing appropriate documentation:

  • Illness of the student of such a duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by FSU’s University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  • Exceptional unforeseen circumstances beyond the control of the student, as approved by the International Programs refund committee.

REFUND AND RELEASE OF LIABILITY POLICY DETAILS

In evaluating requests, the refund committee considers the timeliness of the notification in relation to the event causing the need for withdrawal and timeliness in relation to the start of the program.

  • Refunds or release of liability cannot be granted in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun.
  • In no instance is a refund or release of fee liability request considered if it is after the end of the applicable program or semester, even if the cancellation or withdrawal occurred prior to the start of the program.
  • Applicants who apply and are accepted after published due dates remain liable for fees in accordance with the published dates.

REFUNDS/RELEASE OF LIABILITY OF PROGRAM FEES WHEN IP CANCELS A PROGRAM

Refunds of program fees/release of liability for program fees will be granted when International Programs cancels a program prior to the beginning of the applicable term.

If FSU International Programs cancels a Study Abroad Portion of a program after the start of the term due to causes beyond the control of FSU International Programs, including, but not limited to, acts of God; natural disasters; riots; war; epidemics; terrorist activities; government restrictions; failure of suppliers, subcontractors, or carriers; or travel warnings or prohibitions issued by the World Health Organization or any U.S. federal government agency, including the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Department of State, no refunds of any kind will be issued. However, FSU International Programs, in its sole discretion, may issue refunds for unused program costs such as housing.

Spring 2019 General Program Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

Application Fee

The $100 application fee is nonrefundable.

Confirmation Deposit

The $1500 confirmation deposit is refundable until the close of business on the deposit’s due date. If an applicant has paid the deposit or been granted a deferred payment plan for the deposit and has not withdrawn from a program as of the close of business on the deposit due date, the applicant becomes fully liable for the confirmation deposit. Students whose offer of admission to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) will not be able to participate but remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit.

Full Program Fee

Program applicants who have demonstrated their intent to participate in the program by payment or by deferral of the confirmation deposit and who have not withdrawn from the program as of the full payment due date become fully liable for the full program fee as of the close of business on the full payment due date.

Refunds of Program Fees

Refunds of program fees WILL BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Cancellation of program by International Programs
  2. Involuntary call to active duty
  3. Death of the student or death in the immediate family (parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, or sibling)

Refunds of program fees will not be granted where a student becomes ineligible to participate in a program for failure to meet or maintain admission requirements.

Partial Refunds of Program Fees

Partial refunds of program fees MAY BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Illness of the student of such duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by Florida State's University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  2. Exceptional circumstances that could not have been foreseen and were beyond the control of the student, as approved by the International Programs’ refund committee.
    • Timely notification in relation to the event that caused the need for withdrawal will be considered in evaluating refund requests. In no instance will a request be considered if it is made after the end of the semester for which the refund is requested.
    • Refunds cannot be granted, under any circumstances, in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun.
    • Applicants who apply and are accepted after the published due dates remain liable for fees in accordance with the published due dates.
  3. Rescission of admission by the Florida State University Office of Admission for failure to meet the conditions of one’s admission. Students whose admission offer to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit

Submitting Withdrawals, Requests for Refunds, and Release from Fee Liability

All withdrawals, requests for refunds, and requests for release from fee liability must be submitted in writing via email to International Programs. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the subject line of the email.

Alternatively, requests can be submitted in writing to International Programs at the following postal address:

Attention: Refund Committee
Office of FSU International Programs
A5500 University Center
282 Champions Way
P.O. Box 3062420
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420

Visa Information

Republic of Panama

The majority of your immigration process will take place in Panama with assistance from the Florida State University Republic of Panama staff. Please be aware of the following requirements before departure:


  • Passport Validity: Participants must hold a passport valid for at least six months beyond their intended departure from Panama containing at least two empty visa pages. Keep in mind that the last three pages of your passport are not visa pages.
  • Under 18 Years of Age: Regardless of program duration, minors must submit additional documentation. Please contact IP-Visas@fsu.edu if you will be under 18 upon arrival in Panama.
  • Non-US Citizens: Depending on your country of citizenship, you may be subject to a different immigration process prior to departure. If you are a non-US citizen, please contact IP-Visas@fsu.edu and we will assist you to the best of our ability.
  • Police Background Check: A criminal background check may be required as part of the immigration process. International Programs will obtain this on your behalf.

Important Dates & Documents

Spring 2022
Applications Open*Wednesday, April 07, 2021 $100.00
Scholarship Applications DueWednesday, September 08, 2021
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, September 22, 2021$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, October 20, 2021

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

***

Fall 2022
Applications Open*Wednesday, January 05, 2022 $100.00
Scholarship Applications DueWednesday, April 27, 2022
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, May 18, 2022$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, June 15, 2022

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

***

Summer 2022
Applications Open*Monday, October 11, 2021 $100.00
Scholarship Applications DueWednesday, January 05, 2022
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, January 19, 2022$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, February 16, 2022

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

***

Spring 2023
Applications Open*Wednesday, April 06, 2022 $100.00
Scholarship Applications DueWednesday, September 07, 2022
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, September 21, 2022$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, October 19, 2022

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

***

Documents

Health & Safety

For 60 years, Florida State University International Programs has been committed to providing a rewarding academic and cultural experience that enriches the lives of our students. Our highest priority is and always has been the welfare and security of our students.

Program directors maintain contact with our Tallahassee office, local authorities, and United States officials, both at home and abroad. Each program holds meetings with students in which safety procedures and precautions are detailed and regularly re-emphasized. Each program has an Emergency Plan which includes details about local health care facilities, meeting points and procedures, and contingency plans and funds should it ever become necessary to evacuate our students.

Students are reminded to inform International Programs of the details of their independent travel details via our online travel form, heed US State Department travel advisories, and take relevant emergency and US Embassy/Consulate contact information with them.

Students venture abroad to experience other cultures, and to gain a deeper appreciation of their role as American citizens in the world. FSU International Programs is fully committed to helping students realize these aspirations in a safe and secure learning environment.

Insurance

International Programs Insurance

All International Programs fees include international medical and evacuation insurance coverage through Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI). A link to our policy is provided below. The coverage will be effective for participants from the day the program starts until the day the program ends. Please note: this policy is NOT intended to replace your domestic coverage. For more information, visit studentinsurance.fsu.edu.

Travel Insurance Information

FSU International Programs encourages program participants to consider purchasing travel insurance. Travel insurance comes in many forms and can protect you in case you need to change your travel plans due to unforeseen circumstances. The coverage ranges from help with lost baggage to delay in flight plans to trip cancellation.

Travel insurance that covers fees associated with changing your airfare plans is especially helpful for those attending programs that require entry or student visas. Immigration approval can take months with regulations changing often that can cause the need to delay or cancel flight plans. Often airfare arrangements are non-refundable or cannot be changed without fee penalties. Certain types of trip cancellation insurance will reimburse you the cost of your airfare or penalty fees. Travel Insurance must cover failure to obtain visa.

You may wish to begin researching travel insurance and trip cancellation policies by using the Travel Insurance Review website. Their Travel Insurance 101: The Complete Guide to Travel Insurance section is particularly helpful for those just beginning their research. They also have a section that allows you to compare different policies.

Travel insurance is also offered through CISI and Travel Insured International. Please note that this plan must be purchased within 21 days of paying your first fee. For example, if looking to insure the cost of the program, the plan must be purchased within 21 days of paying the commitment fee to International Programs. If wishing to insure only the cost of the flight, the plan must be purchased within 21 days of purchasing airfare.

Travel Resources

University Policies & Resources

Clery Act

In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Florida State University study center safety guides include institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, and other matters. The report also contains statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain off campus buildings or property owned or controlled by The Florida State University; and on public property within or immediately adjacent and accessible from the campus. A paper copy is available upon request to FSU International Programs at A5500 University Center, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420, or by contacting FSU International Programs at (850) 644-3272 or (800) 374-8581.

Copies are also available from the study center administrative offices, or you may download from the links below: