Broad Curriculum Program | London, England

Apply

  • Slider 1
  • Slider 2
  • Slider 3
  • Slider 4

The broad curriculum program gives students the opportunity to pursue general requirements and elective courses in a variety of disciplines while using London and Great Britain as their textbook.

Students on this program have the opportunity to experience the cultural richness of Great Britain through organized group excursions, often to places overlooked by tourists. Cultural offerings include overnight trips to vibrant cities and the beautiful British countryside. Students will participate in organized day excursions in London and other nearby English cities. Opportunities for personal travel are provided throughout the program, giving students the freedom to explore on their own.

Program Description

Program Sessions

International Programs is committed to the safety and well-being of our students and staff, the academic integrity of our courses, and the high quality of our programming. We are monitoring the impact COVID-19 may have at all locations.

Due to the uncertain nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, all program elements are subject to modification at any time in order to comply with local public health recommendations as well as the policies and practices of Florida State University. Examples of modifications currently in place for Spring 2021 programs include:

    ▪  Independent travel outside host city not permitted
    ▪  Possible 14-day quarantine upon arrival to host country
    ▪  Testing requirements prior to/upon arrival to host country
    ▪  National or regional restrictions or curfews
    ▪  Modifications to course delivery
    ▪  Reduced program capacity, including in housing & classrooms
    ▪  Program dates and/or social cultural calendar modifications


Do not purchase airline tickets until advised to do so by International Programs.

CodeTermStart DateEnd DateFeeApply
LN05Spring 202101/06/2104/22/21$14,445.00Closed

Eligibility

This program is open to all interested students.

Study Center

The FSU London Study Centre is housed in the heart of the historic Bloomsbury district within walking distance of a variety of historic and cultural sites! The study center features a library, computer lab, conservatory & student lounge, lecture theatre, classrooms, and administrative offices. Swipe card access, 24/7 reception, and on-site Program Assistants ensure student safety is the top priority.

Housing

Students studying at FSU London live in shared flats in the center of London. Short walks and easy access to city buses and the London Underground allow students to safely explore this fascinating city. All flats are located either on floors above the study center or in nearby buildings. Amenities include fully equipped kitchens, furnished living areas, Wi-Fi, cable TV, and a weekly cleaning service with a change of bed linens and towels. Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. For a list of hotels near the campus, please click here.

Excursions & Group Activities

Cultural immersion and social events planned for this program may include the following. Group activities and excursions vary per session and may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities.

  • London Excursions

    Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, Kew Palace and Gardens, St. Paul’s Cathedral, Greenwich, Kensington Palace, Street Markets, West End and Off West End Theatre Performances, Shakespeare's Globe, River Thames Boat Ride, Afternoon Tea

  • Overnight Excursions

    Edinburgh & St. Andrews, Bruges and Ypres, Bath and Stonehenge, Liverpool and North Wales, The Lake District, Yorkshire, Cornwall

  • Day Excursions

    Harry Potter Studios, Hampton Court Palace, Windsor Castle, Cambridge, Oxford, Brighton, Stratford-upon-Avon, Hatfield House, and Blenheim Palace

  • Class Excursions

    British Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Tate Modern, Churchill War Rooms, Victoria & Albert Museum, Natural History Museum, Charles Dickens' House, Hyde Park, Houses of Parliament, Old Bailey, Harrods, Museum of London, Bank of England, Royal Albert Hall, Abbey Road, Sherlock Holmes Museum, Wellcome Collection

  • Other Activities

    • Guided coach and walking tours of London
    • Opportunity to participate in London Scholars’ Program (Spring/Fall)
    • Events for charity, movie nights, and pub quizzes
    • FSU football viewing nights
    • Staff vs student football
    • Thanksgiving Day meal (Fall only)

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • Instructional costs for classes offered by International Programs:
    • Up to 6-credit hours for 6-week sessions
    • Up to 12-credit hours for 12-week sessions
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Continental breakfast on class days
  • Weekly pizza & salad dinners at the study center
  • Monthly group meals (Spring/Fall)
  • West End & Off West End Theatre performances
  • Program-planned excursions/group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • 24/7 student support, including staff who live on-site
  • Health insurance
  • Scheduled group airport pick-up
  • London transport pass
  • IP and London Study Centre t-shirts
  • Universal travel adapter
  • Luggage tag

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., per credit hour technology fee)
  • Course-related fees (e.g., theatre tickets)

Courses

To speak with an International Programs Academic Advisor about study abroad courses, you can visit our office during drop-in advising hours on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 1:00-4:00pm, make an appointment using Campus Connect (FSU students only), or contact our advisors directly (Sarah Lovins Bacani at slovins@fsu.edu or Mary Melton at mmelton@fsu.edu) to make an appointment.

IP provides Liberal Studies requirement areas in an effort to help students make informed decisions. Although every attempt is made to be accurate & current, requirement areas are fluid and it is the student’s responsibility to confirm all Liberal Studies requirement areas through the Liberal Studies Course Search Tool and your major advisor.

British Studies Minor

The British Studies Minor enhances and focuses a student’s program in Britain. It requires 15 credits, 9 of which must be earned in London and include a cultural component. Students can choose from various disciplinary perspectives on British  Studies. A maximum of 9 hours may be counted in a single academic discipline. A minimum grade of “C-“ must be earned and a minimum grade point average of 2.0 must be maintained for all courses taken for the minor. Contact Sarah Lovins Bacani (slovins@fsu.edu) for more information. 

Session LN04Fall 2020
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology (online)

This course is an introduction to modern anthropological archaeology. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary scientific approaches employed in contemporary archaeological research and provides students with an overview of the origins and evolution of human social and economic systems.
3
ANT2100LIntroduction to Archaeology Lab (online)

The course is conducted as a hands-on laboratory in archaeological methodology. Each week, students have a series of laboratory exercises designed to teach specific analytical techniques, including paleozoological analysis, paleobotanical analysis, geophysical prospecting techniques, and GIS.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I (online)

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory (online)

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I (online)

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory (online)

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CTE4937Introduction to Italian Fashion and Culture (online)

This course covers the evolution and future perspectives of the global fashion system with an emphasis on European fashion, Italian fashion and the Made in Italy. The critical analysis is based on comparing and contrasting Italian fashion system values with those of the most important fashion capitals: New York, Paris, and London. It looks at fashion styles in relation to art, society, politics, economy, environment, gender, communication, performing arts in a European, and global context. Future fashion trends are emphasized based on interaction with designers, brands, stylists, and professionals, providing students with insights about the future of fashion. Guest speakers from the industry, virtual tours, exclusive presentations, and projects in collaboration with Italian firms provide a unique experiential learning approach to understand the fashion system, and where it’s heading.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
EGN1004LFirst Year Engineering Lab (Face to Face - Wednesday 1:15-3:15)

This laboratory includes an emphasis on student time management, a variety of products and processes, and computer-aided problem solving. Product/process involves sketching and drawing pertinent diagrams by hand, and learning the history and engineering concepts involved. This is a hybrid course. Scheduled meetings will be on Wednesdays from 1:15-3:15.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric (online)

This course includes drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context (online)

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH320519th Century Europe (online)

This course is an introduction to key themes and problems in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the era of the French Revolution to the outbreak of World War I. Although this is an upper-level course, no prior background in European history is required.
3
GEB3213Business Communication (online)

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HUM2020The Art of Being Human (online)

In this course, students gain an overview of the development of Western culture from Antiquity to the present as it is expressed through the arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, music, film and the performing arts), and especially through literature. The course examines the human condition through culture and the arts to better understand how the humanities are interconnected.
3
HUM2235From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (online)

This course explores the cultural roots of western societies through the readings of works by Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Thomas More, Galileo, Shakespeare, Voltaire, and other seminal authors who have contributed to affirm the values of freedom and tolerance. Their works will be examined within a historical and artistic context following the fine thread that links humanistic ideals from the Italian Renaissance through the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century to the Enlightenment; the age and ideas that gave birth to the American nation.
3
HUM4931Topics in the Civ. of Britain: British Life & Culture (online)

This course offers students a practical understanding of contemporary Britain in order to enrich their time spent living and studying abroad. It is an interdisciplinary course that fuses history, sociology and media studies to explain the events and trends that have shaped modern Britain and the lives of its varied citizens. It encourages students to draw on their academic knowledge and life experiences of the United States in order to compare British and American life in the modern era - the differences, similarities and cross-influences between the two nations. Ultimately, this course aims to provide the student with a fresh and lasting perspective on contemporary America through a better understanding of the country with which it reputedly has a ‘Special Relationship’. Costs: Students should maintain a topped-up Oyster Card and allow up to £30 for additional class fees.
3
HUN1201Science of Nutrition (online)

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
IDS2411The Italian Mafia from Corleone to the Globalized World

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
IDS2432Political Participation in the 21st Century: From Indigenous Communities to On-Line Democracy (online)

This course addresses the many experimental forms of political participation that developed in recent years around the world which challenge traditional politics. It deals with social movements, online communities, forms of protests and identity politics among other things. Its approach is multidisciplinary and requires no previous knowledge of politics.
3
IDS2464Crossing the Atlantic: Lorca in America, Hemingway in Spain (online)

Federico García Lorca and Ernest Hemingway are two of the most internationally recognized literary and cultural figures of the 20th century. That is, not only are they viewed with great interest and even division and controversy in their birth countries of Spain and the United States respectively, but they continue to cast a long shadow across the globe and especially over the Atlantic. Furthermore, not only did each of these two compelling figures leave a deep footprint in the other´s country, but they were also influenced and greatly inspired by the socio-cultural patrimony of the other´s homeland. By studying and analyzing Lorca in America and Hemingway in Spain students will explore an inter-cultural journey that reaches the core of how many Spaniards view America and how many Americans view Spain to this day. In this course we will engage, explore and envision Lorca in America and Hemingway in Spain within the enriching comparative context regarding a number of points of analysis: socio-cultural identity and customs, the environment, ethnicity, sexual identity, religion, geography, the artistic merit versus the ethical complexities of the bullfight, human rights and the cruelties of warfare.
3
IDS3435Please Please Me: Anglo-American Youth Culture from the 1950s to the Present (online)

This e-course will examine the cultures that young Britons and Americans have produced and shared for nearly a century. With origins in the 1920s but first identified by advertisers and sociologists in the 1940s, the United States is the birthplace of a phenomenon produced by the consumer society, mass media and a widening generation gap. Yet, Britain has one of the most innovative and vibrant youth cultures in the world, which has come to define post-colonial British identity and has helped to make London the cultural and commercial capital of Europe. This course will examine the history, sociology, aesthetics and economics of British youth culture, from the early days of jazz and rock ‘n’ roll, through to Beatlemania, Punk, Hip Hop and the latest contemporary developments in EDM. How was British youth culture formed, to what extent is it different from America’s - and what does that tell us about larger differences between the two countries? To answer these questions, the course looks at the impact which the black and white cultures of America have had on Britain, as well as charting the influence of Europe, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and indigenous British folk traditions. The unique fusion created from these elements is set in the context of social change in the second half of the 20th century, primarily: class mobility, female independence, black migration, technological progress and the birth of the consumer society. As well as amplifying the creative relationship between music, fashion, cinema, art and design, the course will assess their links with business and the media, showing how underground cults become mainstream culture and how moral panics are turned into material profits. Taught through lectures, film and TV screenings and group discussion, this e-course will not only benefit students majoring in the arts and social sciences but also those in business and communications. This course will satisfy the Liberal Studies area of Social Sciences.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I (online)

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II (online)

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2240Conversation

This course stresses development of conversational skills at the third-year level. May not be taken by native speakers.
3
ITT3523Italian Cinema (online)

This course will focus on Italian cinematic history and examine its contribution to the development of world cinema, more specifically to Hispanic cinema. One of the course's principal aims is to assess the nature of the relationship between Italian and Hispanic cinema and the culture and society which so many of the filmmakers were depicting. We will examine the basic elements of formal film narrative and learn how to see a representation of the physical reality of what has been photographed. We will also explore some sociological issues such as: politics, ethnicity, religion, and class as manifested in film; and how movies express hidden ideas about gender and sexuality. We will view and discuss examples of post-World War II Neorealism, the Commedia all’italiana of the 1950-60s, and the new film narratives of auteurs such as Federico Fellini and Michelangelo Antonioni. We will acquaint ourselves with the ideologically and politically charged landscape of the 1970s and we will explore more recent cinematographic achievements by the Italian directors Roberto Benigni and Paolo Sorrentino, the Mexican and Spanish filmmakers Alfonso Cuarón, Pedro Almodovar, and Guillermo del Toro among others.
3
MAC1105College Algebra (online)

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry (online)

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
3
MAC1140Pre-Calculus Algebra (online)

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2233Calculus For Busines (online)

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAC2311Calculus With Analytic Geometry I (online)

This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MGF1106Math for Liberal Arts I (online)

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors (online)

This course serves as an introduction to creative exploration and expression through digital photography. Students will learn to create dynamic, professional-quality images with their smartphones and/or DSLR cameras by utilizing a wide variety of photographic image-making techniques. However, technical skills are best paired with imagination, so throughout the semester, we will combine the use of learned technical skills with individual interests and ideas. Objectives: 1. Develop a unique and personal photographic style through a variety of thematic projects and photographic “challenges” 2. Effectively use photography as a medium to expand critical and creative thinking and engage others through visual expression 3. Demonstrate how visual communication is affected by aesthetic choices, such as the use of lighting, composition, and editing 4. Constructively critique personal and peer artworks 5. Complete an ambitious photographic series that effectively communicates your ideas and reflects your personal style *NOTE: DSLR cameras are recommended but not required for this course.
3
PHI2010Intro to Philosophy (online)

This course introduces some of the central problems in philosophy. Students also learn how to construct and criticize arguments and develop their own philosophical positions.
3
PSY2012General Psychology (online)

This course is a broad overview covering important psychological principles and findings within the major subfields of psychology, and the basic scientific methods employed. A "bio-psycho-social" approach is emphasized throughout so that all behaviors (including how we think, feel, and act) are discussed in terms of biological, psychological, and social determinants and consequences.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking (online)

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I (online)

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II (online)

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I (online)

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II (online)

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema (online)

In this course we will study the enormous variety of Hispanic film while emphasizing films from Spain. One of the primary objectives of this course is to demonstrate that Hispanic film cannot be stereotyped as falling into a determined genre of film-making. The films we will view and analyze will make you laugh, maybe cry, cause you to feel uneasy, perhaps spark an interest to learn more about Spanish cultural history or explore the thorny dynamics of determined social issues, repel you yet intrigue you at the same time, and even baffle you! Another very important objective of this course is to show that film genres, artistic movements, history, politics, economics and social issues feed off of each other. NOTE: THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN ENGLISH. This class fulfills both the “HUM” and “X” requirements and is a Core Course for the Iberian Studies Minor. • Course materials comment: No book is required but students will conduct extensive Internet based research.
3
WOH1023Modern World To 1815 (online)

This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents of the modern world from the end of the Middle Ages to 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1023. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
Session LN05Spring 2021
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
BSC1005General Biology for Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology for Non-Majors Laboratory (Online)

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics (Online)

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CHM1046General Chemistry II

This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
3
CHM1046LGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
1
CLA2010Peoples of the Roman World

This introductory level course engages with the Roman world from the point of view of the people who lived there. Students study the different kinds of people who inhabited the Roman Empire, focusing on its multiethnic and diverse populaces, and on the ways in which, as in a modern city, rather different groups may have come into contact with one another.
3
CPO3123Comparative Government And Politics: Great Britain

This course examines the political and governmental system of Great Britain within a comparative framework. Comparison and contrast with the United States emphasized.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context (online)

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH320620th Centry Europe

This course covers European history from the turn of the century through the two world wars. Particular attention is paid to the major powers in this period when Europe declined from its preeminent position.
3
HIS4930History of London

This course examines the history of London from its Roman origins through the 20th century. It combines analysis and discussion of a wide variety of primary sources and maps with field work in the form of guided urban walks. Students will learn how to ‘read’ the clues to London’s historical development in the modern cityscape and then apply their understanding and skills in project assignments, such as each exploring and analysing a different neighbourhood of the medieval city. This course examines the history of London from its Roman origins through the 20th century. It combines analysis and discussion of a wide variety of primary sources and maps with field work in the form of guided urban walks. Students will learn how to ‘read’ the clues to London’s historical development in the modern cityscape and then apply their understanding and skills in project assignments, such as each exploring and analysing a different neighbourhood of the medieval city.
3
IDS2060Global Engagement

"The coursework gives you the opportunity to study your country’s unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with your own through actively participating in cultural experiences."
1
IDS3326Understanding Religion: Understanding People

This course introduces students to the evaluation of some key ethical questions relating, in particular, to religious liberty and toleration, to multiculturalism, to personal spiritual exploration, and ultimately to issues of life and death. The course is specifically designed for students studying at the FSU London Study Centre as it makes extensive use of the city itself as a site of discovery, inspiration and reflection.
3
IDS3435Please Please Me: Anglo-American Youth Culture from the 1950s to the Present

This e-course will examine the cultures that young Britons and Americans have produced and shared for nearly a century. With origins in the 1920s but first identified by advertisers and sociologists in the 1940s, the United States is the birthplace of a phenomenon produced by the consumer society, mass media and a widening generation gap. Yet, Britain has one of the most innovative and vibrant youth cultures in the world, which has come to define post-colonial British identity and has helped to make London the cultural and commercial capital of Europe. This course will examine the history, sociology, aesthetics and economics of British youth culture, from the early days of jazz and rock ‘n’ roll, through to Beatlemania, Punk, Hip Hop and the latest contemporary developments in EDM. How was British youth culture formed, to what extent is it different from America’s - and what does that tell us about larger differences between the two countries? To answer these questions, the course looks at the impact which the black and white cultures of America have had on Britain, as well as charting the influence of Europe, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and indigenous British folk traditions. The unique fusion created from these elements is set in the context of social change in the second half of the 20th century, primarily: class mobility, female independence, black migration, technological progress and the birth of the consumer society. As well as amplifying the creative relationship between music, fashion, cinema, art and design, the course will assess their links with business and the media, showing how underground cults become mainstream culture and how moral panics are turned into material profits. Taught through lectures, film and TV screenings and group discussion, this e-course will not only benefit students majoring in the arts and social sciences but also those in business and communications. This course will satisfy the Liberal Studies area of Social Sciences.
3
LIT3383Women In Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
STA2122Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course covers normal distributions, sampling variation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, correlation, simple and multiple regression, contingency tables and chi-square tests, non-parametric statistics. No credit given for STA 2122 if a grade of "C-" or better is earned in STA 2171, STA 3032 or QMB 3200.
3
Session LN01Summer 2021
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ENC4218Visual Rhetoric

This course introduces students to the principles of visual rhetoric, especially as it is enacted across diverse media, shaped by multiple genres, and designed to achieve different goals with different audiences. Students learn to analyze the rhetorical function of imagery, to use images to respond to and organize arguments, and to create images that operate rhetorically.
3
HUM293720th/21st Century British Musical Theatre: Identity, Class, and Difference*

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
IDH000020th/21st Century British Musical Theatre: Identity, Class, and Difference*

Honor's section of the course
3
IDS2372Art Music in Contemporary Society

This course examines the reception of musical performance and contemporary music in the late nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Through this study students select a metropolitan musical capital for their own research project and evaluate the influences of society on music and music on society through the reception of music in the Western canon.
3
LIT3383Women In Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN4301Human Resource Management

This course is a survey of the human resource management function in organizations. Topics include: selection, recruiting, training, compensation, and performance appraisal.
3
NSP3685Grief, Loss and Trauma: Ethnic and Individual Variations

This course explores similarities and differences among cultures when responding to grief and loss. Topics related to diverse populations and grief practices are examined, as well as personal response to grief, loss, and trauma; not exclusively utilizing death as the only example of loss or trauma. The course allows students to expand their reactions to life and death, plan their own funeral, and at the same time focus on family, community, and worldwide populations.
3
NUR3076Communication in Healthcare

This course examines various communication patterns basic to individual and group relationships. Course emphasizes the development of interactive skills paramount to effective communication with individuals and groups involved with health care issues. It provides an opportunity for the validation of oral communication and a range of public speaking experiences especially related to health care.
3
SOW3933Seminar in Global Social Work Ethics

This course gives emphasis to factors driving and arising from social, political, and cultural issues, and to potential ethical conflicts associated with them. Students consider the conceptual and theoretical bases for ethical concerns, including their implications for social welfare practice and policy decisions. The course identifies and critiques ethical dilemmas, with consideration for resolving social justice and social welfare service delivery challenges arising when competing interests collide. Students consider ways in which ethical principles vary depending on the auspice or body from which they arise, comparing and contrasting priorities and values of global, national, or ethnically or religiously identified professional associations.
3
SOW4935Poverty and Homelessness During a Pandemic

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
THE2000Introduction to Theatre

This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.
3
Session LN02Summer 2021
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ACG2021Introduction To Financial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to financial accounting concepts, placing emphasis on financial statements and how they reflect business transactions. Please note, Accounting Majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
ACG2071Introduction Managerial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to managerial accounting concepts. Please note, Accounting majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
BUL3310Legal Environment Of Business

This course offers an introduction to the legal setting in which business operates. Emphasis is on public and regulatory law and on the social, political, and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Subjects include the nature of law and legal process, administrative law, business and the Constitution, statutory and common law, and related topics.
3
ECO2013Principles Of Macroeconomics

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENT4625Music Entrepreneurship and Venture Incubation

This course builds a foundation in music industry entrepreneurship.
3
FIL2001Introduction to Film

This course introduces students to film analysis theories and techniques, including the basics of dramatic structure, genre, prevalent filmmaking theories, and film production processes. Through weekly film screenings, class discussion, and hands-on production exercises, students develop and practice skills to help them compare and interpret films representing a variety of genres, aesthetic traditions, and cultural contexts.
3
FOW3240Literature & Sexuality

This course investigates how modern Western fiction, in particular the modern novel, represents and critically examines a variety of themes related to sexuality in a socio-cultural and political context
3
HUM2742Walking in London

This course explores mobility in the big city through the eyes and ears of the flâneur who saunters aimlessly and leisurely as he or she observes scenes in the big city. We will investigate the political, aesthetic, sociological, and historical meaning of walking in London by reading influential works from a range of disciplines—as well as by doing it. The course will combine theory with practice: students will learn how the term flâneur or “man about town” became shorthand for modernist notions of leisure, spectacle, and elite urban experience across a range of disciplines, from literary studies and art history to urban studies and media theory. Using tools of keen observation, critical awareness, and discussion to think about how, where, and why we walk, students will develop a keener sense of the changing meanings of mobility; of the treatment of national identity, gender, class, and race in relation to urban mobility and sense of place; and of sensory interactions with the social or built environment.
3
LDR2231Global Leadership

This course helps students develop the skills necessary to interact globally whether at home or abroad. It leads students to develop a sense of curiosity for diverse cultures and understanding the various behaviors, attitudes, and emotions which are found globally and impact our daily lives. The knowledge gained about global leadership allows students to recognize and respect cultural differences and be able to maneuver situations more accurately as well as gain insight and understanding of recent world leaders.
3
LDR3215Leadership and Change

This advanced undergraduate leadership course examines the change process and prepares leaders who are effective in working with individuals, groups, and organizations in leading and managing change. This is an interactive theory-to-practice course, focused on leadership as a change process.
3
REE3043Real Estate

This course is a survey introduction to real estate, real estate evaluation, and real estate investment decision making. The course, in addition to REE 4433, meets the FREC educational requirement for real estate sales licensing.
3
THE3061Introduction to Theatre in London

This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Center. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3
Session LN12: Summer 2021
Students must choose one class from LN01, one class from LN02, and one class from LN03
Session LN01Summer 2021
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ENC4218Visual Rhetoric

This course introduces students to the principles of visual rhetoric, especially as it is enacted across diverse media, shaped by multiple genres, and designed to achieve different goals with different audiences. Students learn to analyze the rhetorical function of imagery, to use images to respond to and organize arguments, and to create images that operate rhetorically.
3
HUM293720th/21st Century British Musical Theatre: Identity, Class, and Difference*

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
IDH000020th/21st Century British Musical Theatre: Identity, Class, and Difference*

Honor's section of the course
3
IDS2372Art Music in Contemporary Society

This course examines the reception of musical performance and contemporary music in the late nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Through this study students select a metropolitan musical capital for their own research project and evaluate the influences of society on music and music on society through the reception of music in the Western canon.
3
LIT3383Women In Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN4301Human Resource Management

This course is a survey of the human resource management function in organizations. Topics include: selection, recruiting, training, compensation, and performance appraisal.
3
NSP3685Grief, Loss and Trauma: Ethnic and Individual Variations

This course explores similarities and differences among cultures when responding to grief and loss. Topics related to diverse populations and grief practices are examined, as well as personal response to grief, loss, and trauma; not exclusively utilizing death as the only example of loss or trauma. The course allows students to expand their reactions to life and death, plan their own funeral, and at the same time focus on family, community, and worldwide populations.
3
NUR3076Communication in Healthcare

This course examines various communication patterns basic to individual and group relationships. Course emphasizes the development of interactive skills paramount to effective communication with individuals and groups involved with health care issues. It provides an opportunity for the validation of oral communication and a range of public speaking experiences especially related to health care.
3
SOW3933Seminar in Global Social Work Ethics

This course gives emphasis to factors driving and arising from social, political, and cultural issues, and to potential ethical conflicts associated with them. Students consider the conceptual and theoretical bases for ethical concerns, including their implications for social welfare practice and policy decisions. The course identifies and critiques ethical dilemmas, with consideration for resolving social justice and social welfare service delivery challenges arising when competing interests collide. Students consider ways in which ethical principles vary depending on the auspice or body from which they arise, comparing and contrasting priorities and values of global, national, or ethnically or religiously identified professional associations.
3
SOW4935Poverty and Homelessness During a Pandemic

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
THE2000Introduction to Theatre

This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.
3
Session LN02Summer 2021
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ACG2021Introduction To Financial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to financial accounting concepts, placing emphasis on financial statements and how they reflect business transactions. Please note, Accounting Majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
ACG2071Introduction Managerial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to managerial accounting concepts. Please note, Accounting majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
BUL3310Legal Environment Of Business

This course offers an introduction to the legal setting in which business operates. Emphasis is on public and regulatory law and on the social, political, and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Subjects include the nature of law and legal process, administrative law, business and the Constitution, statutory and common law, and related topics.
3
ECO2013Principles Of Macroeconomics

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENT4625Music Entrepreneurship and Venture Incubation

This course builds a foundation in music industry entrepreneurship.
3
FIL2001Introduction to Film

This course introduces students to film analysis theories and techniques, including the basics of dramatic structure, genre, prevalent filmmaking theories, and film production processes. Through weekly film screenings, class discussion, and hands-on production exercises, students develop and practice skills to help them compare and interpret films representing a variety of genres, aesthetic traditions, and cultural contexts.
3
FOW3240Literature & Sexuality

This course investigates how modern Western fiction, in particular the modern novel, represents and critically examines a variety of themes related to sexuality in a socio-cultural and political context
3
HUM2742Walking in London

This course explores mobility in the big city through the eyes and ears of the flâneur who saunters aimlessly and leisurely as he or she observes scenes in the big city. We will investigate the political, aesthetic, sociological, and historical meaning of walking in London by reading influential works from a range of disciplines—as well as by doing it. The course will combine theory with practice: students will learn how the term flâneur or “man about town” became shorthand for modernist notions of leisure, spectacle, and elite urban experience across a range of disciplines, from literary studies and art history to urban studies and media theory. Using tools of keen observation, critical awareness, and discussion to think about how, where, and why we walk, students will develop a keener sense of the changing meanings of mobility; of the treatment of national identity, gender, class, and race in relation to urban mobility and sense of place; and of sensory interactions with the social or built environment.
3
LDR2231Global Leadership

This course helps students develop the skills necessary to interact globally whether at home or abroad. It leads students to develop a sense of curiosity for diverse cultures and understanding the various behaviors, attitudes, and emotions which are found globally and impact our daily lives. The knowledge gained about global leadership allows students to recognize and respect cultural differences and be able to maneuver situations more accurately as well as gain insight and understanding of recent world leaders.
3
LDR3215Leadership and Change

This advanced undergraduate leadership course examines the change process and prepares leaders who are effective in working with individuals, groups, and organizations in leading and managing change. This is an interactive theory-to-practice course, focused on leadership as a change process.
3
REE3043Real Estate

This course is a survey introduction to real estate, real estate evaluation, and real estate investment decision making. The course, in addition to REE 4433, meets the FREC educational requirement for real estate sales licensing.
3
THE3061Introduction to Theatre in London

This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Center. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3
Session LN04Fall 2021
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology

This course is an introduction to modern anthropological archaeology. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary scientific approaches employed in contemporary archaeological research and provides students with an overview of the origins and evolution of human social and economic systems.
3
ANT2100LIntroduction to Archaeology Lab

The course is conducted as a hands-on laboratory in archaeological methodology. Each week, students have a series of laboratory exercises designed to teach specific analytical techniques, including paleozoological analysis, paleobotanical analysis, geophysical prospecting techniques, and GIS.
1
ARH2000Art, Architecture and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
BSC1005General Biology for Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology Lab for Non-Majors

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CPO3123Comparative Government & Politics: Great Britain

This course examines the political and governmental system of Great Britain within a comparative framework. Comparison and contrast with the United States emphasized.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
ENL3334Introduction to Shakespeare

This course is an introduction to the study of Shakespeare at the college level. Consideration of representative works of comedy, history, tragedy, tragic-comedy drawn from throughout the playwright's career.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HIS4930Tudor England

In this course we will discover Tudor England through contemporary sources, in words, images, music, cultural objects and buildings. It proceeds topically, within a chronological framework. Looming over every aspect of Tudor history is that cataclysmic event of 16th-century Europe, the Protestant Reformation. We shall be investigating the transformation of England from a stronghold of medieval piety to one of Protestant fervor, and how that religious change affected society and politics. Each class session will consist both of lecture and discussion and of activities such as walks and museum visits.
3
HUM4931Topics in the Civ. of Britain: British Life & Culture

This course offers students a practical understanding of contemporary Britain in order to enrich their time spent living and studying abroad. It is an interdisciplinary course that fuses history, sociology and media studies to explain the events and trends that have shaped modern Britain and the lives of its varied citizens. It encourages students to draw on their academic knowledge and life experiences of the United States in order to compare British and American life in the modern era - the differences, similarities and cross-influences between the two nations. Ultimately, this course aims to provide the student with a fresh and lasting perspective on contemporary America through a better understanding of the country with which it reputedly has a ‘Special Relationship’. Costs: Students should maintain a topped-up Oyster Card and allow up to £30 for additional class fees.
3
IDS2060Global Engagement (Online)

A description is not currently available for this course.
1
IDS3435Please Please Me: Anglo-American Youth Culture from the 1950s to the Present

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
INR4083International Conflict

This course examines historical patterns in warfare, and considers the conditions that influence war and peace between nation-states. Topics include causes of war, outcomes and aftermath of war, and approaches to peace.
3
LIT3383Women in Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1140Pre-Calculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
MAC2311Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MGF1106Math for Liberal Studies

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
PHI2010Intro to Philosophy

This course introduces some of the central problems in philosophy. Students also learn how to construct and criticize arguments and develop their own philosophical positions.
3
REL1300Introduction to World Religions

This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
SYO3460Sociology of Mass Media

This course provides a sociological view of mass communications by critically examining the origin, history, and functions of the American mass media and its effect on social life.
3
THE2000Introduction to Theatre

This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.
3
Session LN05Spring 2022
CourseTitleSatisfiesCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
BSC1005General Biology for Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology for Non-Majors Laboratory

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics (Online)

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CHM1046General Chemistry II

This course includes topics such as intermolecular forces, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, elementary thermodynamics, and electrochemistry.
3
CHM1046LGeneral Chemistry II Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
1
CLA2010Peoples of the Roman World

This introductory level course engages with the Roman world from the point of view of the people who lived there. Students study the different kinds of people who inhabited the Roman Empire, focusing on its multiethnic and diverse populaces, and on the ways in which, as in a modern city, rather different groups may have come into contact with one another.
3
CPO3123Comparative Government and Politics: Great Britain

This course examines the political and governmental system of Great Britain within a comparative framework. Comparison and contrast with the United States emphasized.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
ENC3416Writing and Editing in Print and Online

This course focuses on the principles of composing, especially across different composing spaces. Students create works in several different media, including (1) in print, (2) on the screen, and (3) for the network, while also learning how to edit the works deployed in each medium appropriately. In addition, students repurpose at least one of these works for another medium. Students conclude the course by creating a digital portfolio.
3
ENL2022British Authors

This course is a survey of English masterworks intended for students in liberal studies and those exploring a literature major. Among the authors typically considered are Wordsworth, Dickens, and Conrad.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HIS4930History of London

This course examines the history of London from its Roman origins through the 20th century. It combines analysis and discussion of a wide variety of primary sources and maps with field work in the form of guided urban walks. Students will learn how to ‘read’ the clues to London’s historical development in the modern cityscape and then apply their understanding and skills in project assignments, such as each exploring and analysing a different neighbourhood of the medieval city. This course examines the history of London from its Roman origins through the 20th century. It combines analysis and discussion of a wide variety of primary sources and maps with field work in the form of guided urban walks. Students will learn how to ‘read’ the clues to London’s historical development in the modern cityscape and then apply their understanding and skills in project assignments, such as each exploring and analysing a different neighbourhood of the medieval city.
3
HUM3123Irish Culture

This course introduces students to the rich traditions and culture of Ireland. The course acquaints students with the cultural factors that have shaped Ireland in general and Dublin in particular.
3
HUM4931British Life & Culture

This course offers students a practical understanding of contemporary Britain in order to enrich their time spent living and studying abroad. It is an interdisciplinary course that fuses history, sociology and media studies to explain the events and trends that have shaped modern Britain and the lives of its varied citizens. It encourages students to draw on their academic knowledge and life experiences of the United States in order to compare British and American life in the modern era - the differences, similarities and cross-influences between the two nations. Ultimately, this course aims to provide the student with a fresh and lasting perspective on contemporary America through a better understanding of the country with which it reputedly has a ‘Special Relationship’.
3
IDS2322Sexual Health in the Modern World

This course analyzes and synthesizes information centering on a number of current sexual and reproductive health issues. Course materials include the interdisciplinary theorizing of feminists, medical social scientists, anthropologists, demographers, and public health scholars. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours.
3
IDS3326Understanding Religion; Understanding People

This course introduces students to the evaluation of some key ethical questions relating, in particular, to religious liberty and toleration, to multiculturalism, to personal spiritual exploration, and ultimately to issues of life and death. The course is specifically designed for students studying at the FSU London Study Centre as it makes extensive use of the city itself as a site of discovery, inspiration and reflection.
3
IDS3435Please Please Me: Anglo-American Youth Culture from the 1950s to the Present

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
INS3003Introduction to International Affairs

This course introduces students to the core questions and concerns of international affairs. The course surveys the many distinct academic disciplines that together contribute to the development of an interdisciplinary understanding of the international system. The course also examines how each of these disciplines understands the international system, the questions it raises, and its strengths and weaknesses. In addition, the course provides an introduction to many of the global issues of interest to international affairs majors, including terrorism, democracy, and globalization. At the end of this course, students have the skills and knowledge required to construct their own specialized plan of study in international affairs.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAC2312Calculus with Analytic Geometry II

This course covers techniques of integration; applications of integration; series and Taylor series; differential equations. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
PHM2121Philosophy of Race, Class, and Gender

In this course students study selected contemporary philosophical, literary, and journalistic discussions of questions regarding race, class, and gender with a particular emphasis on the status of these discussions in the United States. Students also survey theoretical accounts of the concepts of race, class, and gender, as well as their interrelatedness, and examine their application to various contemporary social issues.
3
PHY2048CGeneral Physics A

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how and why things move. Topics covered include kinematics, forces, energy, momentum, oscillations, and thermodynamics. The course is intended for physical science majors and engineers and to be taken as a sequence with General Physics B (PHY 2049C) and Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101). Completing Modern Physics entitles students to a minor in physics. Calculus is used in this course.
5
PUR3000Introduction to Public Relations

This course introduces the student to the principles and practices of the public relations profession throughout all organizations using public relations.
3
REL3170Religious Ethics and Moral Problems

This course discusses contemporary moral problems such as deception, sexual activities and relations, and capital punishment from the standpoints of major religious traditions.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
STA2122Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course covers normal distributions, sampling variation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, correlation, simple and multiple regression, contingency tables and chi-square tests, non-parametric statistics. No credit given for STA 2122 if a grade of "C-" or better is earned in STA 2171, STA 3032 or QMB 3200.
3
THE2000Introduction to Theatre

This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.
3

*/**/***/****/^ Courses followed by these symbols denote cross listing. Students may take one or the other, but not both.

Money Matters

The biggest factor in deciding when and where to study abroad is often the financial aspect. In fact, too many students assume they cannot afford to participate, missing out on an invaluable opportunity because they are not aware of alternative methods of funding. The Financial Assistance Coordinator at International Programs (IP) is dedicated to helping students through the financial aid application process by conducting financial aid workshops on a regular basis in addition to meeting personally with each student needing assistance. Students who have received some form of financial aid throughout their collegiate careers, as well as those completely new to the process, receive expert care every step of the way. We also help concerned parents! Additionally, students are strongly encouraged to contact the Financial Aid Office at their home school as early as possible. Finally, Florida State students will find additional helpful information on the FSU Financial Aid website.

Please review Understanding the Financial Aid Process for Students Studying Abroad to explore a range of issues for students who anticipate receiving any type of financial assistance. This is a document just for FSU IP students and families, with step-by-step guidance for the process. FSU students, please click here. Non-FSU students, please click here.

For information about the 1098-T form, please click here.

Florida Bright Futures

Florida Bright Futures scholarship funds may be used toward a semester abroad. The Bright Futures Academic Scholarship and Medallion Scholarships will be available for all terms. The Academic scholarship will also include a $300 textbook award for fall and spring only.

The Florida Department of Education website contains additional information concerning eligibility, renewal criteria, appeal processes and legislative updates.

Credit Hours Bright Futures Academic
$213.55 Per Credit Hour
Bright Futures Medallion
$160.16 Per Credit Hour
6 $1281.30 $960.96
7 $1494.85 $1121.12
8 $1708.40 $1281.28
9 $1921.95 $1441.44
10 $2135.50 $1601.60
11 $2349.05 $1761.76
12 $2562.60 $1921.92
13 $2776.15 $2082.08
14 $2989.70 $2242.24
15 $3203.25 $2402.40
16 $3416.80 $2562.56
17 $3630.35 $2722.72
18 $3843.90 $2882.88

Quick Links

Florida Prepaid

Students receiving Florida Prepaid tuition, local fees and/or dorm benefits, may defer a portion of their Program Fee against Florida Prepaid funds. Completing and submitting the fee deferment request form will allow IP to bill Florida Prepaid and apply these funds toward the program fee balance. Completion and submission of the fee deferment request form allows this process to occur.

Students may complete the deferment process by selecting Deferment from the menu above.

To utilize a Florida Prepaid dorm account during the summer term, the purchaser of the Prepaid account must contact Florida Prepaid and complete the steps required to authorize use of the summer dorm plan for studying abroad.

Contact Florida Prepaid directly at 1-800-552-4723 or access their requirements online https://www.myfloridaprepaid.com/resources/forms/

Note: Eligibility for summer financial aid requires enrollment in at least six credits.

How much is my Florida Prepaid worth if I study abroad?

# of Credits Enrolled FPP Tuition FPP Local Fees* Dorm Rate
1 $115.08 $34.73 $3440.00
2 $230.16 $69.46 Per Term**
3 $345.24 $104.19
4 $460.32 $138.92
5 $575.40 $173.65
6 $690.48 $208.38
7 $805.56 $243.11
8 $920.64 $277.84
9 $1035.72 $312.57
10 $1150.80 $347.30
11 $1265.88 $382.03
12 $1380.96 $416.76
13 $1496.04 $451.49
14 $1611.12 $486.22
15 $1726.20 $520.95
  • * Please note the above tuition and fees are subject to change at any time.
  • ** Contact FPP for authorization instructions to use dorm account during a summer term: 850-309-1660 ext. 4134

Quick Links

International Programs Scholarship Opportunities

As a member of the Generation Study Abroad campaign sponsored by the Institute for International Education, Florida State University is committed to the goal of doubling the number of our study abroad participants by 2020. As part of this commitment, International Programs awards an average of $200,000 in scholarships annually to about 100 students.

Current FSU students who have been admitted to an International Program can apply to IP scholarships through the FS4U portal (link below). Before applying, you should review the list of available scholarship opportunities as well as the application process instructions.

Please note: IP scholarships are not available to in-state/out-of-state students currently on the First Year Abroad (FYA) program or First Semester Abroad (FSA) program or those who are directly enrolled at FSU-Panama. Some scholarships may have additional eligibility criteria in addition to what is listed below. Please reference the Scholarship Application Instructions for complete details.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Program Start Date Scholarship Open Date Scholarship Application Deadline Scholarship Award Decisions Communicated to Applicants
Spring 2020 June 10, 2019 September 11, 2019 Prior to September 25, 2019
Spring Break 2020 September 4, 2019 October 23, 2019 Prior to November 6, 2019
Summer 2020 September 12, 2019 December 4, 2019 Prior to January 15, 2020
Fall 2020 January 6, 2020 April 1, 2020 Prior to May 13, 2020
Spring 2021 April 16, 2020 September 9, 2020 Prior to September 23, 2020

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

Other departments at FSU also offer their own study abroad scholarship opportunities. You can review the list of scholarships administered by other FSU departments by following the link below.

As a member of the Generation Study Abroad campaign sponsored by the Institute for International Education, Florida State University is committed to the goal of doubling the number of our study abroad participants by 2020. As part of this commitment, International Programs awards an average of $200,000 in scholarships annually to about 100 students.

Current FSU students who have been admitted to an International Program can apply to IP scholarships through the FS4U portal (link below). Before applying, you should review the list of available scholarship opportunities as well as the application process instructions.

Please note: IP scholarships are not available to in-state/out-of-state students currently on the First Year Abroad (FYA) program or First Semester Abroad (FSA) program or those who are directly enrolled at FSU-Panama. Some scholarships may have additional eligibility criteria in addition to what is listed below. Please reference the Scholarship Application Instructions for complete details.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Program Start Date Scholarship Open Date Scholarship Application Deadline Scholarship Award Decisions Communicated to Applicants
Spring Break 2020 September 4, 2019 October 23, 2019 Prior to November 6, 2019

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

Other departments at FSU also offer their own study abroad scholarship opportunities. You can review the list of scholarships administered by other FSU departments by following the link below.

Other Scholarship Opportunities

Follow the link below for a general listing of  scholarships that may be available for international study. These scholarships are available to both FSU students and Non-FSU students.

Related Materials

External Links

Study Abroad Loans

Additional Discount Opportunities

Students who have completed 15 or more credit hours on programs administered by the IP office, earning at least a 3.0 average or above in course work at the international location(s), are eligible for discounts for subsequent IP programs. Discounts are $500 for summer sessions or $1,000 for fall or spring semesters. Note: These savings are built into the program fees for First Year Abroad program students.

Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute

The Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute, known as FLORICA, was created in 1986, authorized by the Florida Legislature in 1987, and formalized by an agreement signed by the State University System of Florida, the Florida Community College System and the Council of Rectors of Costa Rican Universities (CONARE). Since its beginning, FLORICA has been administered for Costa Rica by CONARE and on behalf of the State of Florida by The Florida State University and Valencia College, with co-directors appointed from each institution.

FLORICA has strong credibility both in Florida and Costa Rica as a stimulus and a catalyst. The Institute has interfaced broadly in Costa Rica with public and private institutions and agencies including all the public universities.

Costa Rican citizens who have applied and been accepted in a Florida public university or community college may apply for out-of-state tuition waivers through the Florida-Costa Rica Institute Non-Resident Tuition Exemption Program.

Co-Directors

Florida State University
Stephanie Tillman
Florida State University
282 Champions Way
University Center Building A
Office Suite A5500
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420
Phone: 850.644.3272
Fax: 850.644.8817
Email: linkage-flcr@fsu.edu

In Partnership with Valencia College
Rocky Blesso
Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute
Valencia College
P.O. Box 3028
Orlando, FL 32802
Phone: 407.582.5287
Email: hblesso@valenciacollege.com

Florida-France Linkage Institute

The Florida-France Linkage Institute was created by the Legislature of the State of Florida in 1989. Over the years, the scope of activities and outreach of the Institute have grown considerably; in Florida, in France, and in the départments of the French Caribbean. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is administered by The University of South Florida in partnership with Florida State University and Miami-Dade College. The educational mission of each of these institutions lends an unusual and unique diversity to the joint co-sponsorship of the Florida-France Linkage Institute. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is supported on behalf of France by the office of the French Consulate-General in Miami.

The Florida-France Linkage Institute utilizes the resources of the State University System and the Community College System. The Institute also serves as a clearinghouse for inter-institutional and community networking to bring projects and activities to college and university campuses.

Thus, the Florida-France Linkage Institute places a high priority on its mission to serve as a facilitator for international tourism, trade, economic development, and business for the Office of Tourism, Trade and Economic Development (OTTED).

For more information about tuition waivers for the Florida-France Linkage Institute and to apply: http://www.usf.edu/world/centers/florida-france/index.aspx

Co-Directors

University of South Florida
Christine Probes
Florida-France Linkage Institute
International Affairs Center
University of South Florida
4202 E. Fowler Ave., CPR107
Tampa, FL 33620-5550
Phone: (813) 974-3104
Fax: (813) 974-4613
Email: probes@usf.edu

In Partnership with Florida State University
To be announced

In Partnership with Miami-Dade College
To be announced

FSU Fees

Technology Fee (Not Included in Program Fees)

Florida State assesses a technology fee which is NOT included in the International Programs fee. The technology fee rate for 2019-2020 is assessed at $5.25 per credit hour for all students, regardless of location of study.

After registration, the student must pay the applicable technology fee; this fee is paid directly to Florida State University Student Business Services. Failure to pay this fee will result in a late payment charge being assessed to the student by Florida State University Student Business Services. International Programs has no control over the fee or any associated late payment penalty.

Facilities & Equipment Fees (Not Included in Program Fees)

International Programs fees do NOT include Facilities and Equipment Fees, which are assessed each semester for some majors (Medicine, Motion Pictures Arts, Music, Nursing, Fine Arts, Dance, Digital Media Production, etc.) even though you are studying overseas. If you are in one of these colleges/majors, you will be assessed a fee. Details can be found on the Registration Guide, under Fees and Financial Information.

Financial Aid Info Sessions

The world is within your reach! Join FSU IP's Financial Aid Coordinator to learn how your financial aid can help you have a study abroad experience of a lifetime!

October

November

Deferment Forms

The online fee deferment is located in the International Programs Student Portal under the Money Matters area. Login here to access the portal.

General Program Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

APPLICATION FEE (STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS)

All study abroad applicants are required to submit a non-refundable, non-transferrable $100 application fee in order to have their application reviewed by International Programs. Paying the application fee does not guarantee admission to a program

COMMITMENT FEE

Once admitted to a study abroad program, a nonrefundable $1,500 Commitment Fee is required to confirm your participation in the program. FSU Applicants expecting to receive financial aid including scholarships, grants, and other sources of assistance have the option to submit a legally binding fee deferment for all or part of the $1,500 commitment fee, with payment of the balance, if any. Non-FSU Students may not defer the Commitment Fee.

Applicants are fee liable for the entire $1,500 commitment fee on the date of receipt of the deferment, payment of the fee or a combination of both, totaling $1,500.

EARLY COMMITMENT DISCOUNT

Admitted applicants who pay or defer the entire $1,500 commitment fee by the Early Commitment Discount Date will receive a $250 reduction in the overall cost of their program. This reduction will be applied towards the full payment, not towards the $1,500 commitment fee.

COMMITMENT FEE PAYMENT DEADLINE

Admitted applicants who have not paid or deferred the non-refundable $1,500 commitment fee in full by the published commitment fee payment deadline will be canceled from their program and have no further fee liability. Applicants who apply to a program after the regular commitment fee payment deadline has passed must pay or defer the entire commitment fee to be eligible for admittance to a program.

FULL PROGRAM FEE

All admitted applicants must pay or defer the full program fee in accordance with the published full payment date in order to avoid being canceled from the program.

  • Admitted applicants who have submitted a written request to cancel from the program by close of business on the full payment due date will be held liable for the $1,500 commitment fee but not the full program fee.
  • Admitted applicants who have not paid or deferred in full and who have not submitted a written request to cancel from the program as of the close of business on the full payment due date will be cancelled from the program and will retain liability for the commitment fee previously paid or deferred.
  • Fully paid or deferred admitted applicants who have submitted a written request to cancel from the program after close of business on the full payment due date will retain liability for the full program fee.

SUBMITTING CANCELLATIONS AND REFUND / RELEASE FROM FEE LIABILITY REQUESTS

Submit all cancellations and requests for refunds or release from fee liability in writing via email to ip-cancel@fsu.edu. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the subject line of the email.

Alternatively, requests may be submitted in writing to International Programs at the following postal address:

Attention: Refund Committee
Office of FSU International Programs
A5500 University Center
282 Champions Way
P.O. Box 3062420
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420

REFUNDS / RELEASE OF LIABILITY OF PROGRAM FEES

Refunds of program fees/release of liability for program fees will be granted when International Programs cancels a program. Additionally, refunds of program fees/release of liability for program fees will be granted for cancellations prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances, upon providing appropriate documentation:

  • Involuntary call to active duty
  • Death of the student or a death in the immediate family (parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, or sibling)

PARTIAL REFUNDS / RELEASE OF LIABILITY OF PROGRAM FEES

Partial refunds/partial release of fee liability for program fees may be granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances, upon providing appropriate documentation:

  • Illness of the student of such a duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by FSU’s University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  • Exceptional unforeseen circumstances beyond the control of the student, as approved by the International Programs refund committee.

REFUND AND RELEASE OF LIABILITY POLICY DETAILS

In evaluating requests, the refund committee considers the timeliness of the notification in relation to the event causing the need for withdrawal and timeliness in relation to the start of the program.

  • Refunds or release of liability cannot be granted, under any circumstances, in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun.
  • In no instance is a refund or release of fee liability request considered if it is after the end of the applicable program or semester, even if the cancellation or withdrawal occurred prior to the start of the program.
  • Applicants who apply and are accepted after published due dates remain liable for fees in accordance with the published dates.

Spring 2019 General Program Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

Application Fee

The $100 application fee is nonrefundable.

Confirmation Deposit

The $1500 confirmation deposit is refundable until the close of business on the deposit’s due date. If an applicant has paid the deposit or been granted a deferred payment plan for the deposit and has not withdrawn from a program as of the close of business on the deposit due date, the applicant becomes fully liable for the confirmation deposit. Students whose offer of admission to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) will not be able to participate but remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit.

Full Program Fee

Program applicants who have demonstrated their intent to participate in the program by payment or by deferral of the confirmation deposit and who have not withdrawn from the program as of the full payment due date become fully liable for the full program fee as of the close of business on the full payment due date.

Refunds of Program Fees

Refunds of program fees WILL BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Cancellation of program by International Programs
  2. Involuntary call to active duty
  3. Death of the student or death in the immediate family (parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, or sibling)

Refunds of program fees will not be granted where a student becomes ineligible to participate in a program for failure to meet or maintain admission requirements.

Partial Refunds of Program Fees

Partial refunds of program fees MAY BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Illness of the student of such duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by Florida State's University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  2. Exceptional circumstances that could not have been foreseen and were beyond the control of the student, as approved by the International Programs’ refund committee.
    • Timely notification in relation to the event that caused the need for withdrawal will be considered in evaluating refund requests. In no instance will a request be considered if it is made after the end of the semester for which the refund is requested.
    • Refunds cannot be granted, under any circumstances, in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun.
    • Applicants who apply and are accepted after the published due dates remain liable for fees in accordance with the published due dates.
  3. Rescission of admission by the Florida State University Office of Admission for failure to meet the conditions of one’s admission. Students whose admission offer to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit

Submitting Withdrawals, Requests for Refunds, and Release from Fee Liability

All withdrawals, requests for refunds, and requests for release from fee liability must be submitted in writing via email to International Programs. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the subject line of the email.

Alternatively, requests can be submitted in writing to International Programs at the following postal address:

Attention: Refund Committee
Office of FSU International Programs
A5500 University Center
282 Champions Way
P.O. Box 3062420
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420

Visa Information

England

A visa is not required for US citizens participating on a study-abroad program under six months. Anyone wishing to partake in two consecutive semesters will likely be required to obtain a visa and should contact an Immigration Specialist at ip-visas@fsu.edu for assistance.

  • Passport Validity: Participants must hold a passport valid for at least six months beyond their intended departure from the UK containing at least two empty visa pages. Keep in mind that the last three pages of your passport are not visa pages.
  • Arrival in the UK: You will be issued an immigration letter before departing the US which explains that you will be partaking on a study abroad programme in the UK. Upon arrival, you must not use the eGates. Instead, you will need to see a Border Force Officer and present them your immigration letter to ensure you receive a short-term student stamp.
  • Flight Restrictions: Due to the relationship between the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom, you will not have the opportunity to obtain the necessary student stamp. Therefore, you cannot arrive on a flight that has a connection through Ireland.
  • Non-US Citizens: It is the responsibility of the participant to check the following link to determine if a visa is needed to partake in a study abroad programme in the UK: https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa. If a visa is required, please email an Immigration Specialist at ip-visas@fsu.edu and they will assist you to the best of their ability.
  • E.U. Citizens: Please be advised that if you possess dual citizenship with a European country, most countries require that you enter on your European passport. Check the expiration date to ensure it is valid for the duration of your time abroad and if it is not, you should renew it immediately.

Important Dates & Documents

Spring 2021
Applications Open*Wednesday, April 08, 2020 $100.00
Early Commitment Discount**Wednesday, September 09, 2020
Scholarship Applications DueWednesday, September 09, 2020
Commitment Fee DueWednesday, September 23, 2020$1500.00
Full Payment DueWednesday, October 21, 2020

*Early application is advisable as program enrollment is limited and acceptances are offered on a rolling basis.

**All admitted applicants must pay the non-refundable commitment fee by the due date to reserve a spot on the program. If you are ready to commit early, you can earn a $250 discount off your program fee by paying the commitment fee by the discount date.

Documents

Health & Safety

For sixty years, Florida State University's International Programs has been committed to providing a rewarding academic and cultural experience that enriches the lives of our students. Our highest priority is and always has been the welfare and security of our students.

Program directors maintain contact with our Tallahassee office, local authorities, and United States officials, both at home and abroad. Each program holds meetings with students in which safety procedures and precautions are detailed and regularly re-emphasized. Each program has an Emergency Plan which includes details about local health care facilities, meeting points and procedures, and contingency plans and funds should it ever become necessary to evacuate our students.

Students are reminded to inform International Programs of the details of their independent travel details via our online travel form, heed US State Department travel advisories, and take relevant emergency and US Embassy/Consulate contact information with them.

Students venture abroad to experience other cultures, and to gain a deeper appreciation of their role as American citizens in the world. FSU International Programs is fully committed to helping students realize these aspirations in a safe and secure learning environment.

Insurance

International Programs Insurance

All International Programs fees include international medical and evacuation insurance coverage through Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI). A link to our policy is provided below. The coverage will be effective for participants from the day the program starts until the day the program ends. Please note: this policy is NOT intended to replace your domestic coverage. For more information, visit studentinsurance.fsu.edu.

Travel Insurance Information

FSU International Programs encourages program participants to consider purchasing travel insurance. Travel insurance comes in many forms and can protect you in case you need to change your travel plans due to unforeseen circumstances. The coverage ranges from help with lost baggage to delay in flight plans to trip cancellation.

Travel insurance that covers fees associated with changing your airfare plans is especially helpful for those attending programs that require entry or student visas. Immigration approval can take months with regulations changing often that can cause the need to delay or cancel flight plans. Often airfare arrangements are non-refundable or cannot be changed without fee penalties. Certain types of trip cancellation insurance will reimburse you the cost of your airfare or penalty fees. Travel Insurance must cover failure to obtain visa.

You may wish to begin researching travel insurance and trip cancellation policies by using the Travel Insurance Review website. Their Travel Insurance 101: The Complete Guide to Travel Insurance section is particularly helpful for those just beginning their research. They also have a section that allows you to compare different policies.

Travel insurance is also offered through CISI and Travel Insured International. Please note that this plan must be purchased within 21 days of paying your first fee. For example, if looking to insure the cost of the program, the plan must be purchased within 21 days of paying the commitment fee to International Programs. If wishing to insure only the cost of the flight, the plan must be purchased within 21 days of purchasing airfare.

Travel Resources

University Policies & Resources

Clery Act

In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Florida State University study center safety guides include institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, and other matters. The report also contains statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain off campus buildings or property owned or controlled by The Florida State University; and on public property within or immediately adjacent and accessible from the campus. A paper copy is available upon request to FSU International Programs at A5500 University Center, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420, or by contacting FSU International Programs at (850) 644-3272 or (800) 374-8581.

Copies are also available from the study center administrative offices or you may download from the links below: