Skip to main content
Skip to main content

Broad Curriculum Program | Florence, Italy

Apply

The broad curriculum program gives students the opportunity to earn credits in both general requirements and elective courses allowing most majors to continue their academic careers while living abroad in Florence.

On program coordinated overnight trips, students are shown the artistic and historical treasures of world-renowned cities such as Venice and Rome. On organized day trips, students have the chance to visit characteristic Italian towns and villages such as Pisa, Siena, Assisi, and Orvieto. Optional site visits offered in and around Florence include the Roman Theater of Fiesole, a walk to Mt. Ceceri where Leonardo experimented with his flying machine, and the textile center of Prato with its emerging Chinatown presence. Throughout the program, getting to know and appreciate Italian cuisine is emphasized through market visits, cooking classes, and special group meals. A number of student volunteer opportunities are also available. Students enjoy a 10-day mid-semester break for extended personal travel.

Program Sessions

CodeTermStart DateEnd DateFeeApply
FL04Fall 201609/01/1612/15/16$12,975.00
FL05Spring 201701/05/1704/20/17$12,975.00
FL03Summer 201705/11/1708/03/17$12,975.00
FL02Summer 201706/29/1708/03/17$7,745.00
FL01Summer 201705/11/1706/22/17$8,485.00
FL04Fall 201708/31/1712/14/17$12,975.00
FL05Spring 201801/04/1804/19/18$12,975.00

Program Description

Eligibility

This program is open to all interested students.

Housing

Program housing is apartment-style within a twenty-minute walk of the study center. Apartments are shared double and triple occupancy bedrooms, bathrooms with a shower, TV, phone, living room with individual study desks, and a utility kitchen. Other amenities include a large fully-equipped common kitchen, free laundry facilities, wireless internet and a lovely spacious garden. Bed linens and towels are provided, along with a weekly cleaning service.

Excursions & Group Activities

Plans may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities. Events planned for this program may include:

  • Overnight Excursions

    Rome excursion visiting Colosseum, the Forum, Catacombs, St. Peter’s, the Sistine Chapel, and Vatican Museum; Venice excursion with private ferry along the Grand Canal, guided visit to St. Mark’s Basilica, Gallerie dell’Accademia Museum, and Peggy Guggenheim contemporary art collection

  • Day Excursions

    Orvieto excursion exploring the village of Cività di Bagnoregio; Pisa and Lucca excursion visiting the cathedral complex, the famous leaning tower, the well-preserved walls, and Guinigi tower with its spectacular views of the city; medieval Tuscan hill towns excursion visiting the Etruscan village of Volterra and San Gimignano with its famous medieval towers; Siena excursion visiting the Civic Palace, Cathedral and Opera museums, and Piazza del Campo

  • Class Excursions

    Uffizi, Academia, Palazzo Vecchio, as well as churches, archaeological sites, and historical locations

  • Other Activities

    • Mayor’s Welcome Day for all U.S. programs held at the Palazzo Vecchio
    • Spring art show when students display their work publicly
    • Lectures, films, visits to local artisans, food and wine tasting, soccer tournaments with other U.S. universities, student talent show, FSU participation in annual Run for Life

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • Instructional costs for up to 16 credit hours
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • 10 meal vouchers per week while school is in session (each worth approximately 5 Euros)
  • Group meals including welcome dinner, dinner on group trips, Carnival dinner, “Last Supper”
  • Program-planned excursions/group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • 24/7 student support, including staff who live on-site
  • Health insurance
  • Entry visa
  • International student ID card
  • IP T-shirt
  • Travel water bottle, luggage tag, and luggage strap

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., technology fee)
  • Course-related fees (except as noted)

Courses

FL01-6-17: Summer 2017
CourseTitleCredits
ACG2021Introduction to Financial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to financial accounting concepts, placing emphasis on financial statements and how they reflect business transactions. Please note, Accounting Majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
ACG2071Introduction to Managerial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to managerial accounting concepts. Please note, Accounting majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
ARH2000Art, Architecture & Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ART2003CContemporary Art Scholarship And Practice

This course provides an introduction to the theories and creative processes that propel contemporary art and design. The course studies a wide range of media and methods used by visual artists and designers to create meaning in their images, objects, and experiences. Offered to all non-art majors.
3
BUL3310Legal Environment of Business

This course offers an introduction to the legal setting in which business operates. Emphasis is on public and regulatory law and on the social, political, and ethical aspects of legal issues in business. Subjects include the nature of law and legal process, administrative law, business and the Constitution, statutory and common law, and related topics.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ENC4218Visual Rhetoric

This course introduces students to the principles of visual rhetoric, especially as it is enacted across diverse media, shaped by multiple genres, and designed to achieve different goals with different audiences. Students learn to analyze the rhetorical function of imagery, to use images to respond to and organize arguments, and to create images that operate rhetorically.
3
ENG4815What is Text?

This course investigates the nature of textuality and its relationship to various media and technologies, while also exploring theoretical and practical questions related to the production and reception of texts in a variety of different forms and media. Students read works in which textuality is broached as a topic, including multimedia texts, and also produce a final project in at least two different media.
3
HUM2020The Art of Being Human

In this course, students gain an overview of the development of Western culture from Antiquity to the present as it is expressed through the arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, music, film and the performing arts), and especially through literature. The course examines the human condition through culture and the arts to better understand how the humanities are interconnected.
3
HUM2235Humanities: From The Renaissance To The Enlightenment

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.
3
HUN1201Science of Nutrition

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
HUN2125Food and Society

This course examines the impact of society on human food ways, role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.
3
IFS3091The Culture is in the Cuisine-The Food of Italy

This course will explore the cultural history of Italian cuisine from its ancient roots to contemporary times. We will examine how culinary practices and the culture of food are essential elements of Italian identity. Students will experience the historical evolution of food and discover how gastronomy is interwoven into all aspects of Italian social life and culture. Through a mixture of first-hand experience and interpretative analysis (study of food manuals, written assignments, and class discussion), the students epicurean travels will include regional explorations into cuisine, the craftsman-like nature of food and wine, and the ethics of food and consumerism as depicted in the Slow Food Revolution.
3
IND3930Sketching the City

Florence is a town of world class art, architecture, and exciting urban life in piazzas,streets and gardens. This course immerses you in the vibrant urban life of Florence and involves you in experiencing and looking closely at the town by sketching elements and aspects of the city environment that interest you. Simple media will be used such as pencil, pen and sketchbook. Materials can be purchased in Florence. The class is beginner-friendly using an easy-to-learn process illustrated by instructor demonstrations. Classes will primarily be held out in the city. The drawing process will be an opportunity to engage Florence at an intimate level by choosing subjects, looking closely to discover how to capture them on paper and making the marks to produce the sketch. The process of sketching will be the way you learn the towns layout and deepen your understanding, appreciation and memories. We will use Florence to learn to draw and use drawing to learn Florence. Your sketchbook will be a visual diary and remembrance piece of your magical time in Italy. ^May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours. *Additional Costs: Students should budget €25 for sketching materials to be purchased in Florence.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2220Reading & Conversation

This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
REE3043Real Estate

This course is a survey introduction to real estate, real estate evaluation, and real estate investment decision making. The course, in addition to REE 4433, meets the FREC educational requirement for real estate sales licensing.
3
SYD3800Sex and Gender

This course examines how gender, as an identity, interaction, institution, and inequality, influences individuals' lives and organizes society.
3
SYG2010Social Problems

This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society, which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.
3
URP4936Florence: The City and its Piazzas

Florence is an elegant, compact, river-based town surrounded by the foothills of Italy’s Appenine mountains. The city’s four story high urban texture is rich with tan buildings, red tile roofs and green shutters. Its shady, stone-paved streets are intimate and winding and lead to wonderful, open sunny piazzas dense with vibrant city life, history, food, art and world famous buildings. Florence’s history has shaped the evolution of its urban forms and city plan and is laced with drama, storybook characters and intrigue. The class covers the history of Florence, its growth and evolution as a town, its plan, urban spaces and its architecture. Emphasis is on experiencing the city first hand through walking tours and on site discussions. The intent is to know and appreciate Florence more deeply and intimately than would be afforded by simply visiting there. Projects and assignments will be tailored to each student’s interests and impressions of Florence.
3
FL02-6-17: Summer 2017
CourseTitleCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture & Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

This course introduces students to a broad range of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Florence. Beginning with the great projects of the Middle Ages that defined the religious and political centers of the city, attention will focus on major monuments of the Renaissance period. Discussion will center on how works of art were made, their style, and how they communicated intellectual meaning. To take full advantage of the opportunities available for the study of art in Florence, most classes will be held in museums, churches, and piazzas. Florence will be our classroom. Sub-themes that intersect with the most recent research in the field of art history are interwoven into each class period. Topics for discussion include the cross-cultural fertilization of artistic ideas, , conflicting ideas regarding patronage, and how works of art construct religious, political, gender, and class identities. The student will analyze the interrelationship between people’s creative achievements and their society. In other words, students must understand a work of art in the social, artistic, and historical contexts of Florence.
3
COM4930Talk of the Town

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeonomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENT3003Introduction to Entrepreneurship

This course is a broad survey of entrepreneurship. It exposes students to different types of entrepreneurship and covers an array of topics that span from idea generation through venture formation, financing, and management while helping students build knowledge and skills to be a successful entrepreneur.
3
FIL2030History of Motion Picture

This course is an overview of international film as an industry, mass medium, and art form.
3
GEB4930Entrepreneurship Seminar

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
HUN1201Science of Nutrition

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
HUN2125Food and Society

This course examines the impact of society on human food ways, role of food and nutrition in national development and global politics. For nonmajors.
3
IFS2013Reality & Illusion in World Cinema

This course examines world cinema with a focus on the elusive and continually shifting boundary between reality and illusion. The course investigates creative approaches to storytelling and the craft of filmmaking not typically seen in traditional Hollywood or American independent film productions.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2240Italian Conversation

This course stresses development of conversational skills at the third-year level. May not be taken by native speakers.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
URP3000Introduction to Planning & Urban Development

This course introduces planning concepts and the role of planning in formulating policy, meeting critical problems, and shaping the future urban environment.
3
URS1006World Cities

In this course, major world cities are examined in terms of their natural, social, and built environments in order to assess those factors that promote quality-of-life and sustainability. Prospects for future growth and change are considered in light of demographic, cultural, economic, and political trends.
3
FL04-9-16: Fall 2016
CourseTitleCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

ARH 2000 is intended to provide a thematic introduction to the understanding and appreciation of art and architecture. Using Florence as a classroom, we will focus specifically on the key artistic developments that have been seen across time on the Italian peninsula, with a greater focus on the art produced from Antiquity through the Renaissance. Issues to be addressed include artistic intention, aesthetic response, materiality and method, as well as embedded intellectual and cultural meanings of the works of art. We will explore how art and architecture related specifically to the social, religious, and political contexts of the time as we seek to understand the role of the arts in the creation of cultural identity. Our discussions will take us right up to the present day as we also consider the place of these works in contemporary local and world culture.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

This course introduces students to a broad range of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Florence. Beginning with the great projects of the Middle Ages that defined the religious and political centers of the city, attention will focus on major monuments of the Renaissance period. Discussion will center on how works of art were made, their style, and how they communicated intellectual meaning. To take full advantage of the opportunities available for the study of art in Florence, most classes will be held in museums, churches, and piazzas. Florence will be our classroom. Sub-themes that intersect with the most recent research in the field of art history are interwoven into each class period. Topics for discussion include the cross-cultural fertilization of artistic ideas, how women, the poor, and children were depicted in Renaissance art, conflicting ideas regarding patronage, and how works of art constructed religious, political, gender, and class identities. *Students may take ARH2000 or ARH4933, not both.
3
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics**

This course is aimed at integrating comparative politics tools within the study of the development of European integration. The first part of the course will focus on the fundamental terms and concepts of politics and government (the state, political participation, democracy etc.), building up a vocabulary and tool-kit for the second part of the course, which will deal with what has been considered the most important political, economic and governance experiment in the last 60 years in Europe, namely the creation of a European Union (EU). We shall then explore its structure, functions, and problematic aspects, providing students with an historical overview of the unification process of European countries since WWII, and analyzing the institutional structure of the EU and the different policies it has adopted in the last decades. **Students may enroll in CPO2002 or CPO3930 but not both.
3
CPO3930The European Union**

This course is aimed at integrating comparative politics tools within the study of the development of European integration. The first part of the course will focus on the fundamental terms and concepts of politics and government (the state, political participation, democracy etc.), building up a vocabulary and tool-kit for the second part of the course, which will deal with what has been considered the most important political, economic and governance experiment in the last 60 years in Europe, namely the creation of a European Union (EU). We shall then explore its structure, functions, and problematic aspects, providing students with an historical overview of the unification process of European countries since WWII, and analyzing the institutional structure of the EU and the different policies it has adopted in the last decades. **Students may enroll in CPO2002 or CPO3930 but not both. Additional Costs: A Course Reader will be available for purchase in a local store (cost is approx. 20 Euros).
3
ECO2000Intro to Economic Thinking (online)

Economics is the study of how people make choices due to scarcity of resources. The major objectives of the course are to 1) develop a basic understanding of the economic way of thinking, 2) investigate the important factors that cause economic growth for a country, 3) apply economic analysis to the political process, and 4) develop the key ingredients to sound personal finance decision making. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major or the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

Economics is the study of choices made due to scarcity of resources. This class will focus on the market system of economic choice. We will analyze how people involved in the market system make choices and how societys economic activities are organized. We will also investigate the governments involvement in choices and how government policy impacts the overall economy. Note: final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2023.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

Economics is the study of how people make choices due to scarcity of resources. This class will focus on the market system of economic choice. We will analyze how individuals, or relatively small groups of individuals, involved in the market system make choices and how societys economic activities are organized. We will also investigate how government policy impacts market outcomes. Final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2013.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course focuses on the writing, reading, and communication skills you will need in your academic life and beyond. It demands of you attentive, analytic reading and constant writing that you will most often choose the subject matter for. You will be expected to approach projects with openness, seriousness, and playfulness, to experiment, and keep a journal. Finally, the class demands your full involvement in our collaborative discussions and regular workshops dedicated to the constructive critique of your writing. At the same time, this course enjoys an added twist here in Florence: not only is it required as one of your first experiences on the foreign turf of University Life, it will also be held in a country probably new to you. For writers intent on bolstering our abilities to articulate our understanding of the world, this distance from home just may lead us to insights we may not have had, had we never ventured forth.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, Context

RESEARCH, GENRE, AND CONTEXT (ENC 2135) is the second of two required composition courses at Florida State University. While continuing to stress the importance of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills emphasized in ENC 1101, as well as the importance of using writing as a recursive process involving invention, drafting, collaboration, revision, rereading, and editing to clearly and effectively communicate ideas for specific purposes, occasions, and audiences, Research, Genre, and Context focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH3431Modern Italy^

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity.
3
HUM4931Italian Life & Culture

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity. ^Students may enroll in only one of these courses: EUH3431, HUM4931, OR ITT3501. Additonal Costs: Students should budget $20-30 for class excursions.
3
IFS2099Participation in the 21st Century: From On-Line Democracy to World Governance

The central issue of the course is the ancient political question: how can we live together? During classes we shall examine evidence from different contexts: examples of local participatory democracy within indigenous groups throughout the world; the use of digital platforms for consultation, political deliberation, mobilization in both developed and developing countries; top-down policy programs for inclusion and participation. Students will learn how to engage with various sources through a variety of approaches: network analysis, policy analysis, participant observation and interviews; also, they will exercise on how to produce articulated and sound texts on their researches.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

Italian 1120 is the first of a three-semester sequence of language courses designed for students with no prior or very little knowledge of Italian or who have studied Italian for less than one year in high school. In this course students begin to develop basic communicative skills in Italian and use those skills to expand their knowledge of Italian culture. This course focuses on developing proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing in Italian and at the same time introducing to various aspects of contemporary Florentine and Italian daily life and culture. The course will offer an interdisciplinary experience in language learning made possible by the extraordinary chance that students have being absorbed every day in the authentic Italian habits. By the end of the course participants will be able to formulate complete sentences in basic Italian about a variety of topics, including daily activities, university life, shopping, family and food. Students will also be able to understand basic dialogues in Italian and to write short compositions. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1121, 1131, 2230 and/or 2300.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1120, 1131, 2230 and/or 2300. ITA1121 must be taken unless student has completed two semesters of Italian or completed placement testing prior to departure.
4
ITA2220Reading and Conversation

This course is designed for students who have completed two semesters of college Italian and are interested in practicing reading and communicative oral skills in Italian. Aspects of Italian history, culture and contemporary life through a variety of readings, and activities are presented in every class. Students will learn to imitate and sustain a general conversation using vocabulary and idiomatic expressions in routine situations. Class discussions will be based on readings taken from Parliamo italiano!, Italian current newspapers, magazines, and other selected sources. Taught in Italian. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college level Italian.
4
ITT3430Masterpieces of Italian Literature in Translation

In the first part of this course we will view the three original crowns of Italian literature, whose works have influenced deeply western culture: Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. In the second part, we will read a selection of the philosophical, romantic poems of Giacomo Leopardi, as well as some naturalistic short stories by Giovanni Verga; the stark prose and classic account of Primo Levi’s days in Auschwitz, and texts by two Nobel Prize winners like the play writer Luigi Pirandello and the poet Eugenio Montale. The works will be examined within a cultural and historical context, stressing the continuity of Italian literary tradition and drawing parallels between different literary genres. The discussion of texts will be integrated occasionally with video projections and visits to pertinent Florentine sites.
3
ITT3501Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present^

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity.
3
ITT3523Italian Cinema

This course will focus on the study of Italian cinema as a reflection of Italian culture. One of the courses principal aims is to assess the nature of the relationship between Italian cinema and the culture and society which so many of the film-makers were depicting. In particular, it investigates the links between the cinema and the other arts (especially literature), and between the cinema and contemporary political and cultural debates (especially on notions of realism and of commitment). The course examines the formal and ideological continuities and differences between Neo-realist films and their impact on later film-makers, such as Federico Fellini, Pietro Germi, Bernardo Bertolucci, Franco Brusati, Ettore Scola, Lina Wertmüller, who attempted to develop new versions of cinematic realism. The course also addresses a number of secondary issues connected with the role of industrial and commercial factors in the cinema; the role of the director (auteurism); the notion of realism in film theory; the relationship between verbal and visual texts; and the representation of gender. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours. ***REQUIRED. PURCHASE TEXTBOOK BEFORE TRAVELING OVERSEAS.***
3
MAC1105College Algebra

Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. On basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105. Review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications.
3
FL04-9-17: Fall 2017
CourseTitleCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

This course introduces students to a broad range of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Florence. Beginning with the great projects of the Middle Ages that defined the religious and political centers of the city, attention will focus on major monuments of the Renaissance period. Discussion will center on how works of art were made, their style, and how they communicated intellectual meaning. To take full advantage of the opportunities available for the study of art in Florence, most classes will be held in museums, churches, and piazzas. Florence will be our classroom. Sub-themes that intersect with the most recent research in the field of art history are interwoven into each class period. Topics for discussion include the cross-cultural fertilization of artistic ideas, how women, the poor, and children were depicted in Renaissance art, conflicting ideas regarding patronage, and how works of art constructed religious, political, gender, and class identities. *Students may take ARH2000 or ARH4933, not both.
3
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics**

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
CPO3930The European Union**

This course is aimed at integrating comparative politics tools within the study of the development of European integration. The first part of the course will focus on the fundamental terms and concepts of politics and government (the state, political participation, democracy etc.), building up a vocabulary and tool-kit for the second part of the course, which will deal with what has been considered the most important political, economic and governance experiment in the last 60 years in Europe, namely the creation of a European Union (EU). We shall then explore its structure, functions, and problematic aspects, providing students with an historical overview of the unification process of European countries since WWII, and analyzing the institutional structure of the EU and the different policies it has adopted in the last decades. **Students may enroll in CPO2002 or CPO3930 but not both. Additional Costs: A Course Reader will be available for purchase in a local store (cost is approx. 20 Euros).
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course includes drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH3431Modern Italy^

This course traces the development of Italy from the Enlightenment to the present. Discussions concentrate on the major social, political, and intellectual currents, centering on the unification movement, the crisis of the Liberal State, and Fascism.
3
HUM4931Italian Life & Culture

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity. ^Students may enroll in only one of these courses: EUH3431, HUM4931, OR ITT3501. Additonal Costs: Students should budget $20-30 for class excursions.
3
IFS2099On-Line Democracy to World Governance

The central issue of the course is the ancient political question: how can we live together? During classes we shall examine evidence from different contexts: examples of local participatory democracy within indigenous groups throughout the world; the use of digital platforms for consultation, political deliberation, mobilization in both developed and developing countries; top-down policy programs for inclusion and participation. Students will learn how to engage with various sources through a variety of approaches: network analysis, policy analysis, participant observation and interviews; also, they will exercise on how to produce articulated and sound texts on their researches. (While the course topics include 'online democracy' this class is taught face-to-face in Florence.)
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2220Reading and Conversation

This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
ITT3430Masterpieces of Italian Literature in Translation

After a general overview of Italian history and culture, this course introduces students to a sample of novels, plays, paintings and movies that present key aspects of Italian culture and its achievements. Taught in English.
3
ITT3501Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present^

This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.
3
ITT3523Italian Cinema

This course offers and introduction to Italian cinema: history, practices, and protagonists. Taught in English.
3
LIT3383Women in Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
FL05-1-17: Spring 2017
CourseTitleCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

ARH 2000 is intended to provide a thematic introduction to the understanding and appreciation of art and architecture. Using Florence as a classroom, we will focus specifically on the key artistic developments that have been seen across time on the Italian peninsula, with a greater focus on the art produced from Antiquity through the Renaissance. Issues to be addressed include artistic intention, aesthetic response, materiality and method, as well as embedded intellectual and cultural meanings of the works of art. We will explore how art and architecture related specifically to the social, religious, and political contexts of the time as we seek to understand the role of the arts in the creation of cultural identity. Our discussions will take us right up to the present day as we also consider the place of these works in contemporary local and world culture.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

This course introduces students to a broad range of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Florence. Beginning with the great projects of the Middle Ages that defined the religious and political centers of the city, attention will focus on major monuments of the Renaissance period. Discussion will center on how works of art were made, their style, and how they communicated intellectual meaning. To take full advantage of the opportunities available for the study of art in Florence, most classes will be held in museums, churches, and piazzas. Florence will be our classroom. Sub-themes that intersect with the most recent research in the field of art history are interwoven into each class period. Topics for discussion include the cross-cultural fertilization of artistic ideas, how women, the poor, and children were depicted in Renaissance art, conflicting ideas regarding patronage, and how works of art constructed religious, political, gender, and class identities. Students may take ARH2000 or ARH4933 but not both. **Many copies of the textbook are available in the Florence library if you prefer not to purchase a copy.
3
ART1300CDrawing Foundations

This course is an introduction to the non-verbal language of imagery. It is essential for anyone who wishes to engage in the creative processing of visual information. In addition to developing basic imaging skills – the perception of forms in space, the definition of borders and outlines, measurement and perspective, proportion, the distinction between positive and negative space, the effective rendering of light and shadow – it presents opportunities to experiment with a variety of media, including graphite, charcoal, pastel, ink and watercolor. Working in a controlled classroom environment and in urban and rural exteriors, students will learn that the ability to create accurate images of the physical world is innate, though it is often impeded by prejudicial thinking: in short, one sees the world not as it is, but in terms of one’s own prior experience. The course method, which draws on the creative potential of the right hemisphere of the brain, will enable students to empty their cache of preconceived images in order to perceive, and render, the world as it appears here and now. **Additional costs include €30 (approx. $40 USD) for drawing paper and implements.
3
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics (online)

CGS 2100, Microcomputer Applications for Business & Economics is an online course that teaches important computer and digital technology concepts and skills necessary to succeed in careers and in life. Course topics range from computer literacy basics, to the information systems on which todays businesses and organizations depend. This course is designed to provide relevant technology coverage for all degree programs. The course covers: Cloud-computing and web 2.0, Social networks, Web-site design introduction, Hardware, Software, Applications, Operating Systems, Communications, Computer security and safety, and Microsoft Word and Excel advanced skills. **Additional Costs include nominal photocopying fees for class readings.
3
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics**

This course is aimed at integrating comparative politics tools within the study of the development of European integration. We will start off by building up our own, specific vocabulary of political terms and concepts, which will include all the necessary information to fully understand the second part of the course: from power to democracy, from policy-making to international affairs, from representation to electoral systems. We shall then take a look at different political systems and, through a process of reverse engineering, we will be able to understand how power is exercised in diverse contexts. Also, a lot of attention will be devoted to the influence of the media in the political process and to the mutual interconnections that characterize the nation-states in a globalized world. In the second part of the course we will concentrate on what has been considered the most important political, economic and governance experiment in the last 60 years in Europe, namely the creation of a European Union (EU), and explore its structure, functions, and problematic aspects. We shall begin with an historical overview of the unification process of European countries since WWII, and will then deal with the institutional structure of the EU and the different policies it has adopted in the last decades. Through examples, comparison with the rest of the world and through a close look at current affairs we will assess how the European institutions and policies affect the citizens and what is and what will be Europe’s role in the contemporary world. Students may take CPO2002 or CPO3930 but not both.
3
CPO3930The European Union**

This course is aimed at integrating comparative politics tools within the study of the development of European integration. We will start off by building up our own, specific vocabulary of political terms and concepts, which will include all the necessary information to fully understand the second part of the course: from power to democracy, from policy-making to international affairs, from representation to electoral systems. We shall then take a look at different political systems and, through a process of reverse engineering, we will be able to understand how power is exercised in diverse contexts. Also, a lot of attention will be devoted to the influence of the media in the political process and to the mutual interconnections that characterize the nation-states in a globalized world. In the second part of the course we will concentrate on what has been considered the most important political, economic and governance experiment in the last 60 years in Europe, namely the creation of a European Union (EU), and explore its structure, functions, and problematic aspects. We shall begin with an historical overview of the unification process of European countries since WWII, and will then deal with the institutional structure of the EU and the different policies it has adopted in the last decades. Through examples, comparison with the rest of the world and through a close look at current affairs we will assess how the European institutions and policies affect the citizens and what is and what will be Europe’s role in the contemporary world. Students may take CPO2002 or CPO3930 but not both. **Students are required to purchase a Course Reader of an approximate cost of €20.
3
ECO2000Intro to Economic Thinking (online)

Economics is the study of how people make choices due to scarcity of resources. The major objectives of the course are to 1) develop a basic understanding of the economic way of thinking, 2) investigate the important factors that cause economic growth for a country, 3) apply economic analysis to the political process, and 4) develop the key ingredients to sound personal finance decision making. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major or the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

Economics is the study of choices made due to scarcity of resources. This class will focus on the market system of economic choice. We will analyze how people involved in the market system make choices and how societys economic activities are organized. We will also investigate the governments involvement in choices and how government policy impacts the overall economy. Note: final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2023.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

Economics is the study of how people make choices due to scarcity of resources. This class will focus on the market system of economic choice. We will analyze how individuals, or relatively small groups of individuals, involved in the market system make choices and how societys economic activities are organized. We will also investigate how government policy impacts market outcomes. Final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2013.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, Context

RESEARCH, GENRE, AND CONTEXT (ENC 2135) is the second of two required composition courses at Florida State University. While continuing to stress the importance of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills emphasized in ENC 1101, as well as the importance of using writing as a recursive process involving invention, drafting, collaboration, revision, rereading, and editing to clearly and effectively communicate ideas for specific purposes, occasions, and audiences, Research, Genre, and Context focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH3431Modern Italy^

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period, Fascist Italy, the gap between citizens and State, the centrality of the family, Italy in the Cold War, the Economic Miracle, Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of notions of an Italian national identity. **Students may take only one of these three classes: EUH 3431 /ITT 3501/HUM 4931 **Additional costs include $25 for class excursions.
3
HUM2235Humanities: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment

This course will introduce students to the cultural roots of present day democracies through the readings of works by authors such as Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Thomas More, Shakespeare, and Voltaire. Their works will be examined within a historical and artistic context, following the fine thread that links humanistic ideals from the Renaissance, through the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century, to the Enlightenment. Special attention will be given to the interaction between national cultures and western philosophical ideas. Anthological as well as integral reading of literary milestones will be accompanied by film screenings and field trips to pertinent Florentine sites. **Additional costs include approximately €25 for class excursions.
3
HUM4931Italian Life & Culture^

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period, Fascist Italy, the gap between citizens and State, the centrality of the family, Italy in the Cold War, the Economic Miracle, Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of notions of an Italian national identity. **Students may take only one of these three classes: EUH 3431 /ITT 3501/HUM 4931 **Additional costs include $25 for class excursions.
3
IFS2099On-Line Democracy to World Governance

The central issue of the course is the ancient political question: how can we live together? During classes we shall examine evidence from different contexts: examples of local participatory democracy within indigenous groups throughout the world; the use of digital platforms for consultation, political deliberation, mobilization in both developed and developing countries; top-down policy programs for inclusion and participation. Students will learn how to engage with various sources through a variety of approaches: network analysis, policy analysis, participant observation and interviews; also, they will exercise on how to produce articulated and sound texts on their researches.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

Italian 1120 is the first of a three-semester sequence of language courses designed for students with no prior or very little knowledge of Italian or who have studied Italian for less than one year in high school. In this course students begin to develop basic communicative skills in Italian and use those skills to expand their knowledge of Italian culture. This course focuses on developing proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing in Italian and at the same time introducing to various aspects of contemporary Florentine and Italian daily life and culture. The course will offer an interdisciplinary experience in language learning made possible by the extraordinary chance that students have being absorbed every day in the authentic Italian habits. By the end of the course participants will be able to formulate complete sentences in basic Italian about a variety of topics, including daily activities, university life, shopping, family and food. Students will also be able to understand basic dialogues in Italian and to write short compositions. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1121, 1131, 2230 and/or 2300.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1120, 1131, 2230 and/or 2300. **Additional costs include €10 for class excursions around Florence.
4
ITA2220Reading and Conversation

This course is designed for students who have completed two semesters of college Italian and are interested in practicing reading and communicative oral skills in Italian. Aspects of Italian history, culture and contemporary life through a variety of readings, and activities are presented in every class. Students will learn to imitate and sustain a general conversation using vocabulary and idiomatic expressions in routine situations. Class discussions will be based on readings taken from Parliamo italiano!, Italian current newspapers, magazines, and other selected sources. Taught in Italian. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college level Italian.
4
ITT3501Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present**

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity.
3
ITT3523Italian Cinema

This course offers and introduction to Italian cinema: history, practices, and protagonists. Taught in English.
3
LIT2020The Short Story

In this course we will examine the genre of the short story by focusing on stories with Italian subjects, settings, characters, and themes. In the first half of the semester, we will consider works by English and American writers and by other non-Italian writers in translation. In the second half, we will concentrate on short stories by Italian writers in translation. We will consider several theoretical approaches to the short story, posing questions such as whether the stories we read seem to expose and counter various cultural stereotypes about Italy or perpetuate them. **Additional costs include €25 for a Photocopy Packet that includes additional class readings.
3
MGF1106Math for Liberal Arts I

Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses. Set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

Students will explore basic concepts and techniques, including the use of the camera, exposure controls, aperture and speed features. Creative exploration through specific assignments will form the basis for the development of aesthaetic criteria. No previous photographic experience is assumed. Students will be able to explore different aspects of contemporary Italian and European culture and society, following various photographic assignments. This course will provide students with a clear grasp of photography and visual communication, as well as introduce the historical and technical tools needed to edit and evaluate pictures and critically select subject matters suitable for a photo story. The class consists of lectures, presentations, demonstrations, shooting sessions and field trips, discussions and critiques on the pictures produced by students, visits to exhibitions and museums. Lectures will cover the history of photography and technical aspects related to digital photography. Students must supply their own digital cameras (a camera with adjustable aperture and speed is a bonus). Student must plan on taking at least 40 photographs per week.They are encouraged to bring their cameras with them during free time and field-trips in oder to complete their assignments. Moreover, they are asked to check the availability of shows and museums when traveling on their own over the weekends. REQUIRED CLASS MATERIALS: Digital Camera (a camera with adjustable aperture and speed is a bonus), Extra Memory Card(s) for digital cameras, Storage media (USB Flash Drive, External Hard drive), Extra batteries for the camera, Connection cable for laptop to download the photographs and edit them. Post-processing application such as Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop installed a bonus. NO TEXTBOOK IS REQUIRED: Essays and articles, online and visual resources will be provided during class **Additional costs: Printed material is not required for this course. If students want to print their digital files, it will be done at their own expense.
3
FL05-1-18: Spring 2018
CourseTitleCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

he course is set against the historical backgrond of Florence and looks at art and architecture in the context of patronage; that of the church, the guilds, the merchants and the Medici, the ruling family of the city. The Renaissance produced outstanding artists such as Donatello, Botticelli, Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael; but these artists could not have existed without their patrons. It is this inter-connection which is our theme. The course will examine the emergence of Renaissance Florence via site visits to churches, palaces, museums and classroom sessions. The story is an unprecedented and excititng one: one small city produced a staggering array of artistic talent in a short period of time. Classical antiquity was the model, not only in artistic terms but in philosophical and political ones as well: Florence saw the rebirth of classical antiquity. The impact of that rebirth, that renaissance, still affects us today: our ways of thought, our ways of seeing are conditioned by that momentous period which changed the past forever, and ushered in the first modern era.
3
ART1300CDrawing Foundations

This course includes creative expression and communication using a variety of black and white media.
3
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications for Business/Economics (online)

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics**

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
CPO3930The European Union**

This course is aimed at integrating comparative politics tools within the study of the development of European integration. Definitions and notions of political concepts will be explained during the first lectures; we will then deal with the most important political, economic and governance experiment in the last 60 years in Europe, namely the creation of a European Union (EU), and explore its structure, functions, and problematic aspects. The course will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of the political system of the European Union, starting off with an historical overview of the unification process of European countries since WWII, to then concentrate on the institutional structure of the EU and the different policies it has adopted in the last decades. But we will also deal with many specific topics – in particular with the role of Italy within the EU – and with the most recent evolution concerning the EU.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH3431Modern Italy^

This course traces the development of Italy from the Enlightenment to the present. Discussions concentrate on the major social, political, and intellectual currents, centering on the unification movement, the crisis of the Liberal State, and Fascism.
3
HUM2235Humanities: From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.
3
HUM4931Italian Life & Culture^

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity. We will go to an historical café and to a museum.
3
IFS2099On-Line Democracy to World Governance

The central issue of the course is the ancient political question: how can we live together? During classes we shall examine evidence from different contexts: examples of local participatory democracy within indigenous groups throughout the world; the use of digital platforms for consultation, political deliberation, mobilization in both developed and developing countries; top-down policy programs for inclusion and participation. Students will learn how to engage with various sources through a variety of approaches: network analysis, policy analysis, participant observation and interviews; also, they will exercise on how to produce articulated and sound texts on their researches.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2220Reading and Conversation

This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
ITA2240Italian Conversation

This course stresses development of conversational skills at the third-year level. May not be taken by native speakers.
3
ITA4930Gendering Art: Italian Female Artists

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
ITT3501Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present**

This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.
3
LIT2020The Short Story

This course covers tone, narration, form, and theme in representative short stories.
3
MGF1106Math for Liberal Arts I

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3

*/**/***/****/^ Courses followed by these symbols denote cross listing. Students may take one or the other, but not both.

Money Matters

The biggest factor in deciding when and where to study abroad is often the financial aspect. In fact, too many students assume they cannot afford to participate, missing out on an invaluable opportunity because they are not aware of alternative methods of funding. The Financial Assistance Coordinator at International Programs (IP) is dedicated to helping students through the financial aid application process by conducting financial aid workshops on a regular basis in addition to meeting personally with each student needing assistance. Students who have received some form of financial aid throughout their collegiate careers, as well as those completely new to the process, receive expert care every step of the way. We also help concerned parents! Additionally, students are strongly encouraged to contact the Financial Aid Office at their home school as early as possible. Finally, Florida State students will find additional helpful information on the FSU Financial Aid website.

Florida Bright Futures

Florida Bright Futures scholarship funds may be used toward a semester abroad. Florida Bright Futures Scholarship funds are available during the fall and spring terms only. Students must complete a FAFSA to be eligible to receive Bright Futures funds for which they qualify. If a student receives Florida Bright Futures scholarship funds and wishes to defer a portion of his or her program fees, the student must complete the fee deferment request form provided at the time of acceptance.

The Florida Department of Education website contains additional information concerning eligibility, renewal criteria, appeal processes and legislative updates. Additional information may also be available through the Florida State Office of Financial Aid.

Credit Hours Bright Futures Academic
$103 Per Credit Hour
Bright Futures Medallion
$77 Per Credit Hour
6 $618 $462
7 $721 $539
8 $824 $616
9 $927 $693
10 $1030 $770
11 $1133 $847
12 $1236 $924
13 $1339 $1001
14 $1442 $1078
15 $1545 $1155
16 $1648 $1232
17 $1751 $1309
18 $1854 1386

Quick Links

Florida Prepaid

Students receiving Florida Prepaid tuition, local fees and/or dorm benefits, may defer a portion of their Program Fee against Florida Prepaid funds. Completing and submitting the fee deferment request form will allow IP to bill Florida Prepaid and apply these funds toward the program fee balance. Completion and submission of the fee deferment request form allows this process to occur.

Students may obtain the deferment form by selecting Deferment from the menu above.

To use a Florida Prepaid dorm account during a summer term, the purchaser of the Prepaid account must send a letter authorizing the use of the benefit. Letters should be mailed to: Florida Prepaid, 1804 Hermitage Blvd., Suite 210, Tallahassee, FL 32308. For more information, contact them at 1-800-552-4723.

Note: Eligibility for summer financial aid requires enrollment in at least six credits.

How much is my Florida Prepaid worth if I study abroad?

# of Credits Enrolled FPP Tuition FPP Local Fees* Dorm Rate
1 $115.08 $34.73 $3240.00
2 $230.16 $69.46 Per Term**
3 $345.24 $104.19
4 $460.32 $138.92
5 $575.40 $173.65
6 $690.48 $208.38
7 $805.56 $243.11
8 $920.64 $277.84
9 $1035.72 $312.57
10 $1150.80 $347.30
11 $1265.88 $382.03
12 $1380.96 $416.76
13 $1496.04 $451.49
14 $1611.12 $486.22
15 $1726.20 $520.95
  • * Please note the above tuition and fees are subject to change at any time.
  • ** Contact FPP for authorization instructions to use dorm account during a summer term: 850-309-1660 ext. 4134

Quick Links

Scholarship & Discount Opportunities

Florida State University has joined the Generation Study Abroad campaign sponsored by the Institute for International Education, committing to a goal of doubling the number of our study abroad participants by 2020. We are proud to be part of this pledge to undertake ambitious actions in order to increase the number of students who study abroad with Florida State!

As part of this commitment, International Programs has launched a $175,000 Generation Study Abroad Scholarships program, Which includes $70,000 worth of new scholarships as well as two existing scholarships being incorporated into the Generation Study Abroad Scholarships program.

Psychology In London Scholarship

This scholarship was established to encourage participation in the FSU Psychology in London summer program. Florida State degree-seeking students who have an overall GPA of 3.25 or above may apply for this need and merit-based scholarship.

Brooks Rogers Memorial Scholarship

Florida State degree-seeking students enrolled full-time in the College of Arts & Sciences or in the College of Fine Arts, who have an overall GPA of 2.85 or above may apply for this need-based scholarship. Preference is given to students studying Art History or the Humanities.

Generation Study Abroad Critical Language Scholarship

Florida State undergraduate degree-seeking students who are majoring or minoring in Chinese or Russian, and who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship. Scholarships are available summer sessions in Tianjin or Moscow. Amounts may be up to 50% of the program fee and are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad First Generation College Student Scholarship

Florida State undergraduate degree-seeking students who are the first in their family to attend college and who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship. Scholarships are available fall, spring, and summer sessions. Amounts may be up to 50% of the program fee and are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad International Programs Achievement Scholarship

Florida State degree-seeking students with an overall GPA of 3.8 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship, available fall, spring and summer sessions. Amounts are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad International Programs Anniversary Scholarship

Florida State degree-seeking students who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this need and merit-based scholarship, which is intended to help increase the number of Florida State students who study abroad. Scholarships are available fall, spring, and summer sessions; and amounts are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad STEM Student Scholarship

Florida State undergraduate degree-seeking students who are majoring in science, technology, engineering, or math, and who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this meritbased scholarship. Scholarships are available fall, spring, and summer sessions. Amounts may be up to 50% of the program fee and are determined based on the applicant pool.

Other International Programs Scholarship Opportunities

Minority Scholarship

To help more minorities study abroad, we offer a Minority Scholarship to degree-seeking Florida State ethnic minority students with an overall GPA of 2.5 or above. There are two $5,000 awards each semester, to be applied toward a fall or spring program in Florence, London, Panama City or Valencia.

Spring Break Scholarship

IP offers a limited number of scholarships for students participating in FSU IP Spring Break programs. Applicants must be Florida State degree-seeking students with an overall GPA of 3.8 or above and no demonstrated financial need or an overall GPA of 3.5 or above with demonstrated financial need. Scholarships will be up to 25% of the program fee.

William Cullen Klein Memorial Scholarship

This scholarship was established in memory of Cullen Klein, a talented linguist double-majoring in Spanish and Chinese. His family established the scholarship in his memory to help open the world to other students through studying abroad on the FSU Tianjin summer program. Florida State degree-seeking students who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Term Deadline
Spring 2017 September 7, 2016
Spring Break 2017 November 2, 2016
Summer 2017 December 7, 2016
Fall 2017 April 5, 2017

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

For information about study abroad scholarships administered by other FSU departments, view the following links:

Ada Belle Winthrop-King Scholarships

Available through the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics. Contact the department for guidelines.

Audrey Wilson Florence Travel Scholarships

Humanities majors participating in the Florence Program may apply for Audrey Wilson Florence Travel Scholarships. Apply through the director of the FSU humanities program Contact the Program in Interndisciplinary Humanities at 850-644-9121.

Bess Ward Honors Thesis Award

Florida State University liberal studies Honor students and Honors in the Major students may apply for a Bess Ward Honors Travel Scholarship. For more information, see the Honors Program website.

The College of Arts & Sciences Study Abroad Scholarship sponsored by the International Enrichment Fund

Available through the College of Arts and Sciences students who meet certain requirements and are attending an FSU International Program (more information available on the scholarship's website).

Scholarship List

General listing of scholarships that may be available for international study. These scholarships are available to both FSU students and Non-FSU students.

Phi Kappa Phi Study Abroad Grant

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi annually awards 100 grants of $1,000 each to selected undergraduate students seeking support for study abroad. The best part is that applicants do NOT have to be a member of Phi Kappa Phi (more information available on the scholarship's website).

Related Materials

External Links

Study Abroad Loans

Additional Discount Opportunities

Students who have completed 15 or more credit hours on programs administered by the IP office, earning at least a 3.0 average or above in course work at the international location(s), are eligible for discounts for subsequent IP programs. Discounts are $500 for summer sessions or $1,000 for fall or spring semesters. Note: These savings are built into the program fees for First Year Abroad program students.

Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute

The Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute, known as FLORICA, was created in 1986, authorized by the Florida Legislature in 1987, and formalized by an agreement signed by the State University System of Florida, the Florida Community College System and the Council of Rectors of Costa Rican Universities (CONARE). Since its beginning, FLORICA has been administered for Costa Rica by CONARE and on behalf of the State of Florida by The Florida State University and Valencia College, with co-directors appointed from each institution.

FLORICA has strong credibility both in Florida and Costa Rica as a stimulus and a catalyst. The Institute has interfaced broadly in Costa Rica with public and private institutions and agencies including all the public universities.

Costa Rican citizens who have applied and been accepted in a Florida public university or community college may apply for out-of-state tuition waivers through the Florida-Costa Rica Institute Non-Resident Tuition Exemption Program.

Co-Directors

Florida State University
Gisela R. Fisher
Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute
Florida State University
282 Champions Way
University Center Building A,
Office Suite A5500
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420
Phone: 850.644.7217
Fax: 850.644.8817
Email: gfisher@fsu.edu

In Partnership with Valencia College
Rocky Blesso
Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute
Valencia College
P.O. Box 3028
Orlando, FL 32802
Phone: 407.582.5287
Email: hblesso@valenciacollege.com

Florida-France Linkage Institute

The Florida-France Linkage Institute was created by the Legislature of the State of Florida in 1989. Over the years, the scope of activities and outreach of the Institute have grown considerably; in Florida, in France, and in the départments of the French Caribbean. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is administered by The University of South Florida in partnership with Florida State University and Miami-Dade College. The educational mission of each of these institutions lends an unusual and unique diversity to the joint co-sponsorship of the Florida-France Linkage Institute. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is supported on behalf of France by the office of the French Consulate-General in Miami.

The Florida-France Linkage Institute utilizes the resources of the State University System and the Community College System. The Institute also serves as a clearinghouse for inter-institutional and community networking to bring projects and activities to college and university campuses.

Thus, the Florida-France Linkage Institute places a high priority on its mission to serve as a facilitator for international tourism, trade, economic development, and business for the Office of Tourism, Trade and Economic Development (OTTED).

For more information about tuition waivers for the Florida-France Linkage Institute and to apply: http://www.usf.edu/world/centers/florida-france/index.aspx

Co-Directors

University of South Florida
Christine Probes
Florida-France Linkage Institute
International Affairs Center
University of South Florida
4202 E. Fowler Ave., CPR107
Tampa, FL 33620-5550
Phone: (813) 974-3104
Fax: (813) 974-4613
Email: probes@usf.edu

In Partnership with Florida State University
Ceil Bare
Florida-France Linkage Institute
Florida State University
A5500 University Center
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420
Phone: (850) 644-1283
Email: cbare@fsu.edu

In Partnership with Miami-Dade College
Christina Florez
Florida-France Linkage Institute
Miami-Dade College
300 NE 2nd Ave., Room 3116
Miami, FL 33132
Phone: (305) 237-3485
Email: cflorez1@mdc.edu

Technology Fee (Not included in program fees)

Florida State assesses a technology fee which is NOT included in the International Programs fee. The technology fee rate for 2016-2017 is assessed at $5.25 per credit hour for all students, regardless of location of study.

After registration, the student must pay the applicable technology fee; this fee is paid directly to Florida State University Student Business Services. Failure to pay this fee will result in a late payment charge being assessed to the student by Florida State University Student Business Services. International Programs has no control over the fee or any associated late payment penalty.

Financial Aid and Financing Study Abroad Workshops

Financial Aid & Financing Study Abroad Workshops will be held at the Askew Student Life Center. See dates and times of workshops below. WALK-INS WELCOME!

  • Tuesday, September 13, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A, 101C Student Life Center
  • Thursday, September 15, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center
  • Tueday, October 4, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center
  • Wednesday, October 5, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center
  • Wednesday, October 13, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center
  • Wednesday, November 2, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center
  • Tuesday, November 8, 2016
    1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center

Deferment Forms

General Program & FSA Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

Application Fee

The $100 application fee is nonrefundable.

Confirmation Deposit

The $1500 confirmation deposit is refundable until the close of business on the deposit’s due date. If an applicant has paid the deposit or been granted a deferred payment plan for the deposit and has not withdrawn from a program as of the close of business on the deposit due date, the applicant becomes fully liable for the confirmation deposit. Students whose offer of admission to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) will not be able to participate but remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit.

Full Program Fee

Program applicants who have demonstrated their intent to participate in the program by payment or by deferral of the confirmation deposit and who have not withdrawn from the program as of the full payment due date become fully liable for the full program fee as of the close of business on the full payment due date.

Refunds of Program Fees

Refunds of program fees WILL BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Cancellation of program by International Programs
  2. Involuntary call to active duty
  3. Death of the student or death in the immediate family (parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, or sibling)

Refunds of program fees will not be granted where a student becomes ineligible to participate in a program for failure to meet or maintain admission requirements.

Partial Refunds of Program Fees

Partial refunds of program fees MAY BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Illness of the student of such duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by Florida State's University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  2. Exceptional circumstances that could not have been foreseen and were beyond the control of the student, as approved by the International Programs’ refund committee.
    • Timely notification in relation to the event that caused the need for withdrawal will be considered in evaluating refund requests. In no instance will a request be considered if it is made after the end of the semester for which the refund is requested.
    • Refunds cannot be granted, under any circumstances, in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun.
    • Applicants who apply and are accepted after the published due dates remain liable for fees in accordance with the published due dates.
  3. Rescission of admission by the Florida State University Office of Admission for failure to meet the conditions of one’s admission. Students whose admission offer to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit

Submitting Withdrawals, Requests for Refunds, and Release from Fee Liability

All withdrawals, requests for refunds, and requests for release from fee liability must be submitted in writing via email to International Programs. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the subject line of the email.

Alternatively, requests can be submitted in writing to International Programs at the following postal address:

Attention: Refund Committee
Office of FSU International Programs
A5500 University Center
282 Champions Way
P.O. Box 3062420
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420

Visa Information

Italy

A Visa is required for US Citizens going to Florence for the following programs: Fall, Spring, First Semester Abroad, First Year Abroad and Interns. Please note any program under 90 days in length does not require a visa for U.S. Citizens. Additional visa documentation will be required for participants under the age of 18.

Non US Citizens: It is the responsibility of the NON-US Citizen to check with their local consulate to see if a visa is required in order to study abroad in Florence. If you are a non-US citizen, please contact us at IP-Visas@fsu.edu.

Full visa requirements and instructions will be provided in the “Visa Packets” linked below. Your visa packet may be in the process of being updated and may not yet be linked. All visa packets will be emailed when updated. Please take note of the following important visa requirements:

For all Florence Participants:

  • Passport: A passport valid for at least 6 months beyond the end of the program is required. The passport must also contain at least 2 blank visa pages. The last 3 pages of the passport do not count as visa pages.

For Spring, Fall, First Semester or Interns:

  • Financial Support in the amount of $4,000: Proof of financial support must be supplied in the form of original financial aid award letters, an original recent bank statement, or a notarized letter from the bank from an account either in the student’s or parents’ names. The funds must be shown from a "liquid account"; checking or savings only. More information will be supplied in the visa packet.

For First Year Abroad Students ONLY:

  • Financial Support in the amount of $12,000: Proof of financial support must be supplied in the form of original financial aid award letters, an original recent bank statement, or a notarized letter from the bank from an account either in the student’s or parents’ names. Funds must be shown from a "liquid account"; checking or savings only. More information will be supplied in the visa packet.

Visa Documents:

Florence Spring 2017 Visa Packet

Important Dates & Documents

Fall 2016 - Important Dates
Early Application Deadline* April 6, 2016 $100
Internship Application Deadline April 6, 2016 $250
Scholarship Deadline April 6, 2016
Confirmation Deposit Due (interns see below) May 18, 2016 $1,500
Internship Confirmation Deposit Due Within one week of acceptance $1,500
Important Forms Due May 18, 2016
Full Payment Due June 8, 2016
Orientation Meeting TBA, mid-March
Spring 2017 - Important Dates
Early Application Deadline* September 7, 2016 $100
Internship Application Deadline September 7, 2016 $250
Scholarship Deadline September 12, 2016
Confirmation Deposit Due (interns see below) September 21, 2016 $1,500
Internship Confirmation Deposit Due Within one week of acceptance $1,500
Important Forms Due September 21, 2016
Full Payment Due October 19, 2016
Summer 2017 - Important Dates
Early Application Deadline* December 7, 2016 $100
Scholarship Application Deadline December 7, 2016
Confirmation Deposit Due January 18, 2017 $1,500
Full Payment Due February 15, 2017
Fall 2017 - Important Dates
Early Application Deadline* April 5, 2017 $100
Scholarship Application Deadline April 5, 2017
Confirmation Deposit Due May 17, 2017 $1,500
Full Payment Due June 7, 2017
Spring 2018 - Important Dates
Early Application Deadline* September 6, 2017 $100
Scholarship Application Deadline September 6, 2017
Confirmation Deposit Due September 20, 2017 $1,500
Full Payment Due October 18, 2017

* Application fees are non-refundable. After the deadline has passed, applications will be accepted on a space available basis excluding interns.

Documents

Health & Safety

For sixty years, Florida State University's International Programs has been committed to providing a rewarding academic and cultural experience that enriches the lives of our students. Our highest priority is and always has been the welfare and security of our students.

Program directors maintain contact with our Tallahassee office, local authorities, and United States officials, both at home and abroad. Each program holds meetings with students in which safety procedures and precautions are detailed and regularly re-emphasized. Each program has an Emergency Plan which includes details about local health care facilities, meeting points and procedures, and contingency plans and funds should it ever become necessary to evacuate our students.

Students are reminded to inform International Programs of the details of their independent travel details via our online travel form, heed US State Department travel advisories, and take relevant emergency and US Embassy/Consulate contact information with them.

Students venture abroad to experience other cultures, and to gain a deeper appreciation of their role as American citizens in the world. FSU International Programs is fully committed to helping students realize these aspirations in a safe and secure learning environment.

Insurance

Travel Insurance Information

FSU International Programs encourages program participants to consider purchasing travel insurance. Travel insurance comes in many forms and can protect you in case you need to change your travel plans due to unforeseen circumstances. The coverage ranges from help with lost baggage to delay in flight plans to trip cancellation.

Travel insurance that covers fees associated with changing your airfare plans is especially helpful for those attending programs that require entry or student visas. Immigration approval can take months with regulations changing often that can cause the need to delay or cancel flight plans. Often airfare arrangements are non-refundable or cannot be changed without fee penalties. Certain types of trip cancellation insurance will reimburse you the cost of your airfare or penalty fees. Travel Insurance must cover failure to obtain visa.

You may wish to begin researching travel insurance and trip cancellation policies by using the Travel Insurance Review website. Their Travel Insurance 101: The Complete Guide to Travel Insurance section is particularly helpful for those just beginning their research. They also have a section that allows you to compare different policies.

Travel Resources

University Policies & Resources

Clery Act

In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Florida State University study center safety guides include institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning alcohol and drug use, crime prevention, the reporting of crimes, sexual assault, and other matters. The report also contains statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain off campus buildings or property owned or controlled by The Florida State University; and on public property within or immediately adjacent and accessible from the campus. A paper copy is available upon request to FSU International Programs at A5500 University Center, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420, or by contacting FSU International Programs at (850) 644-3272 or (800) 374-8581.

Copies are also available from the study center administrative offices or you may download from the links below: