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First Semester Abroad

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Why wait to start your FSU career when you can study abroad now?

Did you apply to attend Florida State University for the Fall semester but received an offer of admission for the Spring semester instead?

Are you ready to become a ‘Nole now? You don’t need to wait until Spring! You can enroll as a Florida State student this Fall through the First Semester Abroad (FSA) program. You may choose one of four exciting locations: London, England; Florence, Italy, Panama City, Panama; or Valencia, Spain.

We place great emphasis on ensuring your progress toward graduation will not be impeded by participating in this program. Classes you take can meet requirements of the Liberal Studies program, your minor, and perhaps even for your major. (Those intending to major in the sciences should choose the London, Panama City or Valencia locations.) Other academic benefits include small classes, personal attention from your faculty members, and courses that incorporate local academic, historical and cultural resources into the fabric of student learning.

Each site abroad has a local staff of professionals who provide support and services to help you address the challenges of university life abroad. Our facilities, programs and excursions provide an environment conducive to academic achievement as well as social and personal development. In addition, Bright Futures and Florida Prepaid can be applied towards FSA program fees, as can other forms of financial aid.

For more information, please contact Lauren Schoenberger or Betty Seymour in the International Programs office, phone (850) 644-3272, toll free (800) 374-8581. There is limited space available for this program, so we encourage you to apply as soon as possible. The deadline to apply and pay the confirmation deposit is May 1, 2017. Acceptance may be offered on a space-available basis after the deadline. We hope to have you as a part of the Florida State family through the FSA Program.

Program Sessions

Do not purchase airline tickets until advised to do so by International Programs.

CodeLocationTermStart DateEnd DateFeeApply
FS04FlorenceFall 201609/01/1612/15/16$12,975.00
LS04LondonFall 201609/01/1612/15/16$13,490.00
PS04PanamaFall 201608/24/1612/17/16$11,895.00
VS04ValenciaFall 201609/01/1612/15/16$12,995.00
VS04ValenciaFall 201708/31/1712/14/17$12,995.00
PS04PanamaFall 201708/23/1712/16/17$11,925.00
LS04LondonFall 201708/31/1712/14/17$13,490.00
FS04FlorenceFall 201708/31/1712/14/17$12,975.00

Program Description

Housing

Program housing is apartment-style within an approximate 20-minute walk from the Study Center. Bedrooms are twins and triples with shared bathrooms and a utility kitchen. Other amenities include a large fully-equipped common kitchen, washing and drying facilities, wireless internet and a spacious walled-in private garden for the student residents. Bed linens and towels are provided, along with a weekly cleaning service. Daily meal vouchers to local cafes and restaurants are also included in the program fee. Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. Please click here for a listing of recommended hotels in Florence.

Program Specific Excursions & Group Activities

Cultural immersion/social events planned for this program may include:

  • Visit to Rome: Colosseum, the Forum, Catacombs, St. Peter’s, the Sistine Chapel, Vatican Museum (2 days)
  • Trip to Venice: private ferry along the Grand Canal, guided visit to St. Mark’s Cathedral, the gold mosaics, monumental gold and jeweled altarpiece, contemporary art experience at the Peggy Guggenheim Museum (2 days)
  • Day excursion to Orvieto: exploring the ancient underground of Orvieto and the disappearing village of Civita’ di Bagno Regio
  • Day trip to Pisa and Lucca: visiting the cathedral complex, posing for photo holding up the leaning tower, visiting city of Lucca with its well-preserved walls and the Guinigi family tower with spectacular view from the top
  • Day trip to medieval Tuscan hill-top towns: Etruscan village of Volterra and famous towers of S. Gimignano
  • Trip to Siena (heart of the Tuscan countryside): visiting the Civic Palace, Cathedral and Opera museums, Piazza del Campo where a centuries old horse race is held every summer
  • Class trips with on-site lessons held in famous museums such as the Uffizi, Accademia (houses the David), Palazzo Vecchio, as well as churches, archaeological sites and historic locations
  • Mayor’s Welcome Day for all U.S. programs held at the Palazzo Vecchio where the Medici family held court
  • Spring art show: students display work publicly
  • Lectures, films, visits to local artisans, wine and food tasting, soccer tournaments with other U.S. universities, student talent show organized for the elderly, FSU participation in annual Run for Life benefiting women’s breast cancer research

* Plans may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities.

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • All instructional costs for up to 10 undergraduate credits for Summer 1 and 2, up to 16 undergraduate credits for Summer 3, Fall, or Spring*
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Fall & Spring: ten meal vouchers per week while school is in session (each worth approximately 5 Euros)
  • Summer sessions: seven meal vouchers per week while school is in session (each worth approximately 5 Euros)
  • Group meals including Welcome Dinner, 'Last Supper', dinner on group trips, Thanksgiving meal (Fall), Carnevale dinner (Spring)
  • Program planned excursions
  • Program planned group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • Full-time administrative support
  • Entry visa
  • Health Insurance
  • International Student ID Card
  • IP T-shirt and travel water bottle
  • IPre-Depart-specific summer orientation in Tallahassee for Freshman students

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., technology fee)
  • Course-related fees (except as noted)

Housing

Located in historic Bloomsbury, in the heart of central London, and situated in a row of seventeenth-century townhouses, the London Study Centre combines modern convenience with a historic setting. With its fully self-contained and furnished apartments, the Centre, among other amenities, boasts 24-hour wireless connectivity, two computer labs, a library, free laundry facilities, and a student lounge. Flats include shared bedrooms, bathroom with shower, sitting room with TV and a well-equipped kitchen. If these spaces are filled, students are housed in comparable accommodations within central London. Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. For a list of hotels near the campus, please click here.

Program Specific Excursions & Group Activities

Cultural immersion/social events planned for this program may include:

  • Overnight Excursions

    Edinburgh and St. Andrews, Bruges and Ypres, Bath and South Wales, Yorkshire, Cornwall, Stonehenge, Liverpool, and North Wales

  • Day Excursions

    Harry Potter Studios, St. Albans, Hampton Court Palace and Windsor, Cambridge, Oxford, Brighton, and Stratford-upon-Avon

  • London Excursions

    Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, Kew Palace, St. Paul’s Cathedral, Greenwich, and the London Eye

  • Class Excursions

    British Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Tate Modern, and the Churchill War Rooms

  • Other Activities

    • Theatre performances in the West End, Shakespeare’s Globe, the Minack in Cornwall, and Stratford
    • Guided coach and walking tours of London
    • Boat trips on the River Thames
    • High tea at the National Gallery
    • Opportunity to participate in the Scholar of the Semester program
    • FSU football viewing nights, events for charity, movie nights, pub quizzes, and more

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • All instructional costs for 3 undergraduate credits for Summer 1, 2 and 3*, up to 9 undergraduate credits for Summer 4 and 5*, up to 12 undergraduate credits for Summer 6*, up to 16 undergraduate credits Fall or Spring
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Continental breakfast on class days
  • Weekly pizza night
  • Special group meals
  • Program planned excursions including two weekend trips within the UK (Fall & Spring)
  • Program planned group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • London transport pass
  • Scheduled group airport pickup
  • Full-time administrative support
  • Health Insurance
  • International Student ID Card
  • IP T-shirt and travel water bottle
  • IPre-Depart-specific summer orientation in Tallahassee for Freshman students

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., technology fee)
  • Course-related fees (except as noted)

Housing

Students live in furnished residences with fully equipped kitchens, living-dining areas, shared bedrooms, and multiple bathrooms. These student houses are within walking distance from the main classroom and administrative building. Other international universities with study abroad and local programs are present in the area as well, allowing for possible networking with their students. The Panama FSU Study Center offers students the opportunity to participate in an extensive sports program which includes paddling (cayuco racing), soccer, basketball, tennis, indoor soccer, swimming, chess, flag-football and ping-pong. Students have access to 60 acres of sports facilities including an Olympic-sized swimming pool, extensive outdoor sports fields, and a full gym.

Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. For a list of hotels in Panama City, please click here.

Program Specific Excursions & Group Activities

Cultural immersion/social events planned for this program may include:

  • Welcome dinner
  • Tour of the Panama Canal Locks and Visitors’ Center
  • Exploration of Colonial Panama, Old Panama, Cosmopolitan Panama
  • Visit to the indigenous communities of the Embera Indians
  • Countryside excursion
  • Visit to a certified agro-touristic farm
  • Visit to the Achiotines tuna fish research laboratory
  • Liquor distillery visit
  • Tour of Taboga and Contadora Islands
  • Turtle hatching expedition
  • Visit to the Colón Free Zone
  • Excursion to the highlands of Panama, including visit to a coffee plantation farm and coffee processing plant
  • Tour of Bocas del Toro
  • Visit to Portobelo and San Lorenzo Fortress
  • Tour of Isla Grande
  • Eco-Canal Tour
  • Farewell dinner

* Plans may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities.

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • All instructional costs for up to 10 undergraduate credits for Summer 1, up to 16 undergraduate credits for Summer 2, Fall, or Spring
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Program planned excursions
  • Program planned group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • Full-time administrative support
  • Entry visa
  • Scheduled group pickup at airport
  • Health Insurance
  • International Student ID Card
  • IP T-shirt and travel water bottle
  • IPre-Depart-specific summer orientation in Tallahassee for Freshman students

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., technology fee)
  • Course-related fees (except as noted)

Housing

Fully furnished multi-roomed high quality apartments at the Valencia Study Center include shared double and triple occupancy bedrooms, bathrooms with a shower, a living room with a TV and a fully-equipped kitchen. The center offers 24/7 front desk coverage, free laundry facilities, wireless internet access, and a computer lab. Bed linens and towels are provided, as well as cleaning once per week. If these spaces are filled, students will be housed in comparable accommodations within central Valencia. Overnight guests are not allowed in program housing. For a list of hotels near the campus, please click here.

Academic Program Requirement

Must enroll in a class with a prefix of SPN, SPT, SPW, HUM, ANT, EUH or enroll in IFS 2099 (not applicable to summer term).

Program Specific Excursions & Group Activities

Cultural immersion/social events planned for this program may include:

  • Madrid excursion visiting surrounding locations of Toledo, Segovia, Salamanca or Alcalá de Hernares (3-4 days)
  • Barcelona excursion visiting the Dali Museum and Sagrada Familia (3-4 days)
  • Andalucía excursión, visting Granada’s Alhambra, Sevilla, Córdoba and flamenco activities. (3-4 days)
  • Pyrenees excursion with rafting activity, medieval castles, mountain activities (3-4 days)
  • Optional day trips every Friday to locations around Valencia: Roman city of Sagunto, Xátiva Castle, wineries of Requena, mountain walks, historical locations, special interactive museum visits
  • Weekly activities including: sports events, exchange conversation meetings, tours, food tasting, group dinners, special events
  • Club de Español weekly events for total immersion in the Spanish language
  • Specific class field trips including: Valencia Court, local archaeology sites, historical landmarks, local markets, theatres, operas, distinctive biospheres
  • Classes integrated in the local Polytechnic University and Universidad Católica with access to state of the art labs
  • Lectures and demonstrations by Spanish professionals in various fields of work

* Plans may change due to unexpected events and/or new opportunities.

Program Fees

Include:

  • All registration fees
  • All instructional costs for up to 10 undergraduate credits for Summer 1 and 2, up to 16 undergraduate credits for Summer 3, Fall, or Spring*
  • Welcome orientation
  • Housing
  • Four meal vouchers per week while school is in session (each worth approximately 7 Euros)
  • Breakfast on class days (Fall and Spring)
  • Program planned excursions
  • Program planned group activities
  • Full-time academic support
  • Full-time administrative support
  • Scheduled group pickup at airport
  • Entry visa
  • Health Insurance
  • International Student ID Card
  • IP T-shirt and travel water bottle
  • IPre-Depart-specific summer orientation in Tallahassee for Freshman students

*For graduate course availability in all sessions, please contact Betty Seymour.

Do Not Include:

  • Round-trip international airfare
  • Passport
  • Food (except as noted)
  • Books and supplies
  • Personal travel/activity money
  • Personal spending money
  • University-assessed fees (e.g., technology fee)
  • Course-related fees (except as noted)

Courses

FS04-9-16: Fall 2016
CourseTitleCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

ARH 2000 is intended to provide a thematic introduction to the understanding and appreciation of art and architecture. Using Florence as a classroom, we will focus specifically on the key artistic developments that have been seen across time on the Italian peninsula, with a greater focus on the art produced from Antiquity through the Renaissance. Issues to be addressed include artistic intention, aesthetic response, materiality and method, as well as embedded intellectual and cultural meanings of the works of art. We will explore how art and architecture related specifically to the social, religious, and political contexts of the time as we seek to understand the role of the arts in the creation of cultural identity. Our discussions will take us right up to the present day as we also consider the place of these works in contemporary local and world culture.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

This course introduces students to a broad range of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Florence. Beginning with the great projects of the Middle Ages that defined the religious and political centers of the city, attention will focus on major monuments of the Renaissance period. Discussion will center on how works of art were made, their style, and how they communicated intellectual meaning. To take full advantage of the opportunities available for the study of art in Florence, most classes will be held in museums, churches, and piazzas. Florence will be our classroom. Sub-themes that intersect with the most recent research in the field of art history are interwoven into each class period. Topics for discussion include the cross-cultural fertilization of artistic ideas, how women, the poor, and children were depicted in Renaissance art, conflicting ideas regarding patronage, and how works of art constructed religious, political, gender, and class identities. *Students may take ARH2000 or ARH4933, not both.
3
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics**

This course is aimed at integrating comparative politics tools within the study of the development of European integration. The first part of the course will focus on the fundamental terms and concepts of politics and government (the state, political participation, democracy etc.), building up a vocabulary and tool-kit for the second part of the course, which will deal with what has been considered the most important political, economic and governance experiment in the last 60 years in Europe, namely the creation of a European Union (EU). We shall then explore its structure, functions, and problematic aspects, providing students with an historical overview of the unification process of European countries since WWII, and analyzing the institutional structure of the EU and the different policies it has adopted in the last decades. **Students may enroll in CPO2002 or CPO3930 but not both.
3
CPO3930The European Union**

This course is aimed at integrating comparative politics tools within the study of the development of European integration. The first part of the course will focus on the fundamental terms and concepts of politics and government (the state, political participation, democracy etc.), building up a vocabulary and tool-kit for the second part of the course, which will deal with what has been considered the most important political, economic and governance experiment in the last 60 years in Europe, namely the creation of a European Union (EU). We shall then explore its structure, functions, and problematic aspects, providing students with an historical overview of the unification process of European countries since WWII, and analyzing the institutional structure of the EU and the different policies it has adopted in the last decades. **Students may enroll in CPO2002 or CPO3930 but not both. Additional Costs: A Course Reader will be available for purchase in a local store (cost is approx. 20 Euros).
3
ECO2000Intro to Economic Thinking (online)

Economics is the study of how people make choices due to scarcity of resources. The major objectives of the course are to 1) develop a basic understanding of the economic way of thinking, 2) investigate the important factors that cause economic growth for a country, 3) apply economic analysis to the political process, and 4) develop the key ingredients to sound personal finance decision making. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major or the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

Economics is the study of choices made due to scarcity of resources. This class will focus on the market system of economic choice. We will analyze how people involved in the market system make choices and how societys economic activities are organized. We will also investigate the governments involvement in choices and how government policy impacts the overall economy. Note: final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2023.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

Economics is the study of how people make choices due to scarcity of resources. This class will focus on the market system of economic choice. We will analyze how individuals, or relatively small groups of individuals, involved in the market system make choices and how societys economic activities are organized. We will also investigate how government policy impacts market outcomes. Final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2013.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course focuses on the writing, reading, and communication skills you will need in your academic life and beyond. It demands of you attentive, analytic reading and constant writing that you will most often choose the subject matter for. You will be expected to approach projects with openness, seriousness, and playfulness, to experiment, and keep a journal. Finally, the class demands your full involvement in our collaborative discussions and regular workshops dedicated to the constructive critique of your writing. At the same time, this course enjoys an added twist here in Florence: not only is it required as one of your first experiences on the foreign turf of University Life, it will also be held in a country probably new to you. For writers intent on bolstering our abilities to articulate our understanding of the world, this distance from home just may lead us to insights we may not have had, had we never ventured forth.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, Context

RESEARCH, GENRE, AND CONTEXT (ENC 2135) is the second of two required composition courses at Florida State University. While continuing to stress the importance of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills emphasized in ENC 1101, as well as the importance of using writing as a recursive process involving invention, drafting, collaboration, revision, rereading, and editing to clearly and effectively communicate ideas for specific purposes, occasions, and audiences, Research, Genre, and Context focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH3431Modern Italy^

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity.
3
HUM4931Italian Life & Culture

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity. ^Students may enroll in only one of these courses: EUH3431, HUM4931, OR ITT3501. Additonal Costs: Students should budget $20-30 for class excursions.
3
IFS2098Global Engagement (online) (required of all freshmen)

Study your study-abroad country through first-hand encounters and engagement. The coursework gives you the opportunity to study your country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with your own through actively participating in cultural experiences. In addition to weekly reflective assignments, the course will ask you to choose a specific custom to report on such as looking at race and social class through the football and cricket sporting cultures in England or the significance of the patriarchal society through the courtship dances in Italy.
1
IFS2099Participation in the 21st Century: From On-Line Democracy to World Governance

The central issue of the course is the ancient political question: how can we live together? During classes we shall examine evidence from different contexts: examples of local participatory democracy within indigenous groups throughout the world; the use of digital platforms for consultation, political deliberation, mobilization in both developed and developing countries; top-down policy programs for inclusion and participation. Students will learn how to engage with various sources through a variety of approaches: network analysis, policy analysis, participant observation and interviews; also, they will exercise on how to produce articulated and sound texts on their researches.
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

Italian 1120 is the first of a three-semester sequence of language courses designed for students with no prior or very little knowledge of Italian or who have studied Italian for less than one year in high school. In this course students begin to develop basic communicative skills in Italian and use those skills to expand their knowledge of Italian culture. This course focuses on developing proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing in Italian and at the same time introducing to various aspects of contemporary Florentine and Italian daily life and culture. The course will offer an interdisciplinary experience in language learning made possible by the extraordinary chance that students have being absorbed every day in the authentic Italian habits. By the end of the course participants will be able to formulate complete sentences in basic Italian about a variety of topics, including daily activities, university life, shopping, family and food. Students will also be able to understand basic dialogues in Italian and to write short compositions. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1121, 1131, 2230 and/or 2300.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1120, 1131, 2230 and/or 2300. ITA1121 must be taken unless student has completed two semesters of Italian or completed placement testing prior to departure.
4
ITA2220Reading and Conversation

This course is designed for students who have completed two semesters of college Italian and are interested in practicing reading and communicative oral skills in Italian. Aspects of Italian history, culture and contemporary life through a variety of readings, and activities are presented in every class. Students will learn to imitate and sustain a general conversation using vocabulary and idiomatic expressions in routine situations. Class discussions will be based on readings taken from Parliamo italiano!, Italian current newspapers, magazines, and other selected sources. Taught in Italian. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college level Italian.
4
ITT3430Masterpieces of Italian Literature in Translation

In the first part of this course we will view the three original crowns of Italian literature, whose works have influenced deeply western culture: Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio. In the second part, we will read a selection of the philosophical, romantic poems of Giacomo Leopardi, as well as some naturalistic short stories by Giovanni Verga; the stark prose and classic account of Primo Levi’s days in Auschwitz, and texts by two Nobel Prize winners like the play writer Luigi Pirandello and the poet Eugenio Montale. The works will be examined within a cultural and historical context, stressing the continuity of Italian literary tradition and drawing parallels between different literary genres. The discussion of texts will be integrated occasionally with video projections and visits to pertinent Florentine sites.
3
ITT3501Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present^

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity.
3
ITT3523Italian Cinema

This course will focus on the study of Italian cinema as a reflection of Italian culture. One of the courses principal aims is to assess the nature of the relationship between Italian cinema and the culture and society which so many of the film-makers were depicting. In particular, it investigates the links between the cinema and the other arts (especially literature), and between the cinema and contemporary political and cultural debates (especially on notions of realism and of commitment). The course examines the formal and ideological continuities and differences between Neo-realist films and their impact on later film-makers, such as Federico Fellini, Pietro Germi, Bernardo Bertolucci, Franco Brusati, Ettore Scola, Lina Wertmüller, who attempted to develop new versions of cinematic realism. The course also addresses a number of secondary issues connected with the role of industrial and commercial factors in the cinema; the role of the director (auteurism); the notion of realism in film theory; the relationship between verbal and visual texts; and the representation of gender. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours. ***REQUIRED. PURCHASE TEXTBOOK BEFORE TRAVELING OVERSEAS.***
3
MAC1105College Algebra

Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. On basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105. Review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications.
3
FS04-9-17: Fall 2017
CourseTitleCredits
ARH2000Art, Architecture, and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
ARH4933Florentine Renaissance

This course introduces students to a broad range of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Florence. Beginning with the great projects of the Middle Ages that defined the religious and political centers of the city, attention will focus on major monuments of the Renaissance period. Discussion will center on how works of art were made, their style, and how they communicated intellectual meaning. To take full advantage of the opportunities available for the study of art in Florence, most classes will be held in museums, churches, and piazzas. Florence will be our classroom. Sub-themes that intersect with the most recent research in the field of art history are interwoven into each class period. Topics for discussion include the cross-cultural fertilization of artistic ideas, how women, the poor, and children were depicted in Renaissance art, conflicting ideas regarding patronage, and how works of art constructed religious, political, gender, and class identities. *Students may take ARH2000 or ARH4933, not both.
3
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics**

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
CPO3930The European Union**

This course is aimed at integrating comparative politics tools within the study of the development of European integration. The first part of the course will focus on the fundamental terms and concepts of politics and government (the state, political participation, democracy etc.), building up a vocabulary and tool-kit for the second part of the course, which will deal with what has been considered the most important political, economic and governance experiment in the last 60 years in Europe, namely the creation of a European Union (EU). We shall then explore its structure, functions, and problematic aspects, providing students with an historical overview of the unification process of European countries since WWII, and analyzing the institutional structure of the EU and the different policies it has adopted in the last decades. **Students may enroll in CPO2002 or CPO3930 but not both. Additional Costs: A Course Reader will be available for purchase in a local store (cost is approx. 20 Euros).
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course includes drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
EUH3431Modern Italy^

This course traces the development of Italy from the Enlightenment to the present. Discussions concentrate on the major social, political, and intellectual currents, centering on the unification movement, the crisis of the Liberal State, and Fascism.
3
HUM4931Italian Life & Culture

The course is intended to introduce students to the major issues and themes in Italian history from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present day. We will investigate key issues such as the process of nation-building in the Liberal period; Fascist Italy; the gap between citizens and government; the centrality of the family; Italy in the Cold War; the Economic Miracle; Berlusconis Italy. We will also discuss the changes that have occurred as a result of the combined effect of industrialization, urbanization and secularization. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the South in the construction of an Italian national identity. ^Students may enroll in only one of these courses: EUH3431, HUM4931, OR ITT3501. Additonal Costs: Students should budget $20-30 for class excursions.
3
IFS2099On-Line Democracy to World Governance

The central issue of the course is the ancient political question: how can we live together? During classes we shall examine evidence from different contexts: examples of local participatory democracy within indigenous groups throughout the world; the use of digital platforms for consultation, political deliberation, mobilization in both developed and developing countries; top-down policy programs for inclusion and participation. Students will learn how to engage with various sources through a variety of approaches: network analysis, policy analysis, participant observation and interviews; also, they will exercise on how to produce articulated and sound texts on their researches. (While the course topics include 'online democracy' this class is taught face-to-face in Florence.)
3
ITA1120Elementary Italian I

This introductory course gives the student basic grammatical structures to enable speaking, understanding, reading, and writing at the elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1121 and/or 2220.
4
ITA1121Elementary Italian II

This course builds upon the students ability to speak, understand, read, and write Italian at an elementary level. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 2220.
4
ITA2220Reading and Conversation

This course stresses skills in reading and conversational Italian at the second-year level. Readings are supported by discussions of the materials. This course completes the baccalaureate degree requirement. May not be taken concurrently with ITA 1111, 1120 and/or 1121. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
ITT3430Masterpieces of Italian Literature in Translation

After a general overview of Italian history and culture, this course introduces students to a sample of novels, plays, paintings and movies that present key aspects of Italian culture and its achievements. Taught in English.
3
ITT3501Modern Italian Culture: From the Unification to the Present^

This course is an introduction to the cultural developments and sociopolitical changes in modern Italy from the Risorgimento to the formation of a nation. Students examine Fascism's influence on the national culture, as well as consider the contemporary impact of immigration on diversity. Offered in English.
3
ITT3523Italian Cinema

This course offers and introduction to Italian cinema: history, practices, and protagonists. Taught in English.
3
LIT3383Women in Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
LS04-9-16: Fall 2016
CourseTitleCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology

This course will give the student a good grounding in the discipline of archaeology - covering both theory and practice. It will introduce the student to some of the great archaeologists of their day and the extraordinary discoveries made by early pioneers who went in search of the cities and palaces of the Bible or of the historical truths that might lie at the root of myth and legend. It will trace the emergence of civilizations along the banks of the world's great rivers - the Nile, the Tigris, Euphrates and Indus. Towns buried by volcanic eruptions will be explored - as will the archaeology of the Thames right here on our doorstep. In addition it will look at the ethics of archaeology - the display of human remains, acquisition and repatriation - as well as examining the importance of their cultural heritage to developing countries.
3
ARH2000Art, Architecture and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art. This course covers a variety of approaches to thinking about art and its relevance to our world and to London in particular. To do this we will consider different art forms, from so-called ‘high art’ to visual culture that was never intended to be seen in a museum. We will explore museums and galleries where we can interact with the art of the past and its relationship to the present.
3
BSC2010Biological Science I

Basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Lab

This laboratory furnishes tools and techniques used to visualize, quantify, analyze biological phenomena, including experimental design and execution, recording of data, and graphic and statistical analysis of data. This course will be taught off site for FSU credit.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of “C–” or better or placement beyond MAC 1105. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour. This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. This course will be taught off site for FSU credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Lab

Introduction to chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, and acids and bases. Safety goggles and a scientific calculator are required for every class
1
CPO3123Comparative Government & Politics: Great Britain

This course will introduce students to the politics and society of Great Britain. We will examine the history of Britain, locating the origins and development of its institutions, consider those institutions in their modern contexts, and conclude by considering the challenges and opportunities facing Britain in the current global environment. The institutions considered will include the political (e.g., Parliament versus the Crown), electoral (e.g., the Westminster System), bureaucratic (e.g., the NHS), and social (e.g., immigration and Empire). Throughout the course, frequent reference will be made to the similarities and differences between British and American institutions – the latter being created partly in emulation of and partly in reaction against the former. The successful student will demonstrate a strong command of the assigned materials, as well as an ability to consider how institutions both shape and are shaped by both structural and contingent forces. ***Additional costs: Students should budget about £20 for public transportation and up to £40 in class fees.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

Economics is the study of how people make choices due to scarcity of resources. The major objectives of the course are to 1) develop a basic understanding of the economic way of thinking, 2) investigate the important factors that cause economic growth for a country, 3) apply economic analysis to the political process, and 4) develop the key ingredients to sound personal finance decision making. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major or the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

Economics is the study of choices made due to scarcity of resources. This class will focus on the market system of economic choice. We will analyze how people involved in the market system make choices and how societys economic activities are organized. We will also investigate the governments involvement in choices and how government policy impacts the overall economy. Note: final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2023.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

Economics is the study of how people make choices due to scarcity of resources. This class will focus on the market system of economic choice. We will analyze how individuals, or relatively small groups of individuals, involved in the market system make choices and how society's economic activities are organized. We will also investigate how government policy impacts market outcomes. Final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2013.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This freshman composition course will help you grow as a writer and a critical thinker by encouraging you to investigate and to write about communities that have played a role in shaping you as an individual and about the communities around you now. This course aims to help you improve your writing and communication skills in all areas. Writing is a recursive and frequently collaborative process of invention, drafting, and revising. Writing is both personal and social, and students should learn how to write for a variety of purposes and audiences. Classes rely heavily on a workshop format. Learning from each other will be a large part of the classroom experience.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre & Context

This course is the second of two required composition courses at FSU. While continuing to stress the importance of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills emphasized, in ENC1101, as well as the importance of using writing a recursive process involving invention, drafting, collaboration, revision, rereading, and editing to clearly and effectively communicate ideas for specific purposes, occasions, and audiences, this course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts. Students will produce at least 6,000 polished words in a variety of genres, as well as journal writing.
3
ENL3334Introduction to Shakespeare

In this introduction to the works of William Shakespeare, students will encounter his poetry and the different types of plays he wrote: comedy, tragedy, history and romance. The course will explore Shakespeare’s London and give insight into the Elizabethan and Stuart theatre practices. Students discuss Shakespeare plays both as text on the page and as heard in performance.
3
HIS4930Tudor England

In this course we will discover Tudor England through contemporary sources, in words, images, music, cultural objects and buildings. It proceeds topically, within a chronological framework. Looming over every aspect of Tudor history is that cataclysmic event of 16th-century Europe, the Protestant Reformation. We shall be investigating the transformation of England from a stronghold of medieval piety to one of Protestant fervor, and how that religious change affected society and politics. Each class session will consist both of lecture and discussion and of activities such as walks and museum visits.
3
HUM4931Topics in the Civ. of Britain: British Life & Culture

This course offers students a practical understanding of contemporary Britain in order to enrich their time spent living and studying abroad. It is an interdisciplinary course that fuses history, sociology and media studies to explain the events and trends that have shaped modern Britain and the lives of its varied citizens. It encourages students to draw on their academic knowledge and life experiences of the United States in order to compare British and American life in the modern era - the differences, similarities and cross-influences between the two nations. Ultimately, this course aims to provide the student with a fresh and lasting perspective on contemporary America through a better understanding of the country with which it reputedly has a ‘Special Relationship’. Costs: Students should maintain a topped-up Oyster Card and allow up to £30 for additional class fees.
3
IFS2098Global Engagement (online) (required of all freshmen)

Study your study-abroad country through first-hand encounters and engagement. The coursework gives you the opportunity to study your country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with your own through actively participating in cultural experiences. In addition to weekly reflective assignments, the course will ask you to choose a specific custom to report on such as looking at race and social class through the football and cricket sporting cultures in England or the significance of the patriarchal society through the courtship dances in Italy.
1
IFS2099Who Do the British Think They Are?

This course will examine the cultures that young Britons and Americans have produced and shared for nearly a century. The United States is the birthplace of a phenomenon produced by the consumer society, mass media and a widening generation gap. Yet, Britain has one of the most innovative and vibrant youth cultures in the world, which has come to define post-colonial British identity and has helped to make London the cultural and commercial capital of Europe. This course will examine the history, sociology, aesthetics and economics of British youth culture, from the early days of jazz and rock roll, through to Beatlemania, Punk, Hip Hop and the latest contemporary developments in EDM. How was British youth culture formed, to what extent is it different from America - and what does that tell us about larger differences between the two countries? As well as amplifying the creative relationship between music, fashion, cinema, art and design, the course will assess how underground cults become mainstream culture and how moral panics are turned into material profits. Taught through lectures, film and TV screenings and group discussion, this e-course will not only benefit students majoring in the arts and social sciences but also those in business and communications.
3
LIT3383Women in Literature

This course considers both women in gothic novels and the female gothic as a genre. We will read works such as Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto, Ann Radcliffe’s The Italian, Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre. We will discuss such topics as femininity and domesticity in the gothic novel, attitudes toward female authorship, the female response to the male gothic, the role of the gothic in the rise of the novel, and past and present responses to the gothic as a genre. The course includes a visit to Walpole’s Strawberry Hill Gothic Mansion in London, as well as a visit to the Jane Austen House in Chawton. **While the instructor will be teaching from the Oxford World’s Classics editions of the novels, students may use any comparable editions (make sure that your edition of Frankenstein follows the 1831 text), and these novels should be easily found in London. Some novels may be available in the library, and all of the novels can be found for free on e-readers. ***Additional Costs include £75 for class excursions, admission fees, and a performance of Frankenstein.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations, and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. These textbooks are recommended, but neither is required.
3
MAC1140Precalculus Algebra

Prerequisite: MAC 1105 or suitable mathematics examination placement score. This course covers functions and graphs, especially higher degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solution of linear systems, matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series, induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof.
3
REL1300Introduction to World Religions

This course is an introduction to religions as doctrinal systems and social and cultural phenomena studied in the context of their history and development in Britain. The course includes visits to religious sites.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course is designed to assist you in developing confident oral communication skills. Reading and discussion will focus on the theory, while the speeches and group exercises will allow for a practical application of the theory. Throughout the course, the emphasis will be on providing a supportive atmosphere through positive reinforcement and constructive feedback. Students will be encouraged to assist one other with positive feedback as well as suggestions for future improvement. Each student will have the opportunity to lead a short public tour at the world-famous British Museum. Students will also have the opportunity to speak at the international home of Public Speaking which is Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park. Costs: Students will need to keep their Oyster cards topped up.
3
THE2000Introduction to Theatre

For nonmajors. This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Centre. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE3061 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3
LS04-9-17: Fall 2017
CourseTitleCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology

This course is an introduction to modern anthropological archaeology. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary scientific approaches employed in contemporary archaeological research and provides students with an overview of the origins and evolution of human social and economic systems.
3
ARH2000Art, Architecture and Artistic Vision

This course focuses on a thematic approach to the understanding and appreciation of works of art.
3
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CPO3123Comparative Government & Politics: Great Britain

This course examines the political and governmental system of Great Britain within a comparative framework. Comparison and contrast with the United States emphasized.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course includes drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
ENL3334Introduction to Shakespeare

This course is an introduction to the study of Shakespeare at the college level. Consideration of representative works of comedy, history, tragedy, tragic-comedy drawn from throughout the playwright's career.
3
HIS4930Tudor England

In this course we will discover Tudor England through contemporary sources, in words, images, music, cultural objects and buildings. It proceeds topically, within a chronological framework. Looming over every aspect of Tudor history is that cataclysmic event of 16th-century Europe, the Protestant Reformation. We shall be investigating the transformation of England from a stronghold of medieval piety to one of Protestant fervor, and how that religious change affected society and politics. Each class session will consist both of lecture and discussion and of activities such as walks and museum visits.
3
HUM4931Topics in the Civ. of Britain: British Life & Culture

This course offers students a practical understanding of contemporary Britain in order to enrich their time spent living and studying abroad. It is an interdisciplinary course that fuses history, sociology and media studies to explain the events and trends that have shaped modern Britain and the lives of its varied citizens. It encourages students to draw on their academic knowledge and life experiences of the United States in order to compare British and American life in the modern era - the differences, similarities and cross-influences between the two nations. Ultimately, this course aims to provide the student with a fresh and lasting perspective on contemporary America through a better understanding of the country with which it reputedly has a ‘Special Relationship’. Costs: Students should maintain a topped-up Oyster Card and allow up to £30 for additional class fees.
3
LIT2081Contemporary Literature

This course covers poetry, fiction, drama from WWI to the present. For beginning students.
3
LIT3383Women in Literature

In this course, students study texts that consider women's roles in society. The course focuses on women's gender roles and legal status during the Victorian period. What kinds of political and literary power did women have? What did women have to say about social and political matters? How did women use literary forms to communicate their arguments?
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1140Precalculus Algebra

This course covers functions and graphs, especially high degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solutions of linear systems; matrix methods; determinants; sequences and series; induction; and the binomial theorem. The course also explores applications, approximation, and methods of proof. May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114.
3
PGY2100cPhotography for Non-Art Majors

This course is an introduction to camera operation and image making, with discussion of contemporary and historical work. Emphasis on 35mm slide projects rather than printing techniques. (This course may be offered as part of FSU International Programs curriculum.)
3
POS4070Race, Ethnicity and Politics

This course examines how race and ethnicity are interwoven in American politics by viewing the role of African-American, Latino, and Asian-American voters, candidates, and public officials, and looking at the political attitudes of these groups.
3
REL1300Introduction to World Religions

This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
SYO3460Sociology of Mass Media

This course provides a sociological view of mass communications by critically examining the origin, history, and functions of the American mass media and its effect on social life.
3
THE2000Introduction to Theatre

This course focuses on the historical development and basic elements for appreciation and evaluation of theatrical performances. The course is designed for non-majors.
3
THE3061Introduction to London Theatre

This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the components of the theatrical experience as they relate specifically to current dramaturgy and stagecraft in London. It is to be offered only at The Florida State University London Study Center. It should be viewed as a companion class to THE 2000 Introduction to Theatre, for majors and nonmajors, but may be taken independently. It makes use of the theatrical resources in the city of London, including attendance at leading theatres, backstage tours, and lectures by prominent theatre artists.
3
PS04-9-17: Fall 2017
CourseTitleCredits
ACG2021Introduction to Financial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to financial accounting concepts, placing emphasis on financial statements and how they reflect business transactions. Please note, Accounting Majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
ACG2071Introduction to Managerial Accounting

This course offers an introduction to managerial accounting concepts. Please note, Accounting majors must earn at least a "B" in this course to proceed to required 3000 level accounting courses.
3
AMH2020History of the U.S. Since 1877

This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.
3
AST1002Planets, Stars, and Galaxies

This course provides general acquaintance with some of the facts, concepts and scientific methods of astronomy. As a liberal study course, the goal is to help students learn some basic facts of astronomy as well as gain an appreciation of astronomy as a science, the universe, and the current scientific ideas about its history and its future.
3
BSC1005Biology For Non-Majors

This course consists of four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LBiology For Non-Majors Laboratory

This course may be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CGS2100Microcomputer Applications For Business/Economics

This course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, World Wide Web, multi-media presentations, and information systems. May not be applied toward computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060.
3
CHM1020Chemistry for Liberal Studies

This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. The course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit not allowed for CHM 1020 after taking CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.
3
CHM1020LChemistry for Liberal Studies Laboratory

This laboratory emphasizes major topics from CHM 1020 relating chemistry concepts and techniques to everyday life experiences. This laboratory-based course meets two hours a week. No credit allowed after taking CHM 1045.
1
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microconomics

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ECS4013Economics of Development

This course presents economic development as a process, description and analysis; alternative overall theories of development; particular problems and policy responses to them; strategic choices in development policy. Main focus on third world economies.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course includes drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
GEA1000World Geography

This course is a regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.
3
GEO1331Environmental Science

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
GEO4340Living in a Hazardous Environment

This course explores types of environmental hazards (natural and human-made) and their effects, techniques for the analysis of risks, and strategies for recovering losses.
3
GIS4043Geographic Information Systems

This course is a survey of GIS topics, including locational control, spatial data structures, modeling and analysis, and future trends in decision support, sensors, and geographic methods.
3
GLY1030Environmental issues in Geology

This course examines environmental issues as they relate to geological phenomena, which include volcanic and earthquake hazards, resource and land-use planning, air and water pollution, waste disposal, glaciation and sea-level change, landslides, flooding, shoreline erosion, and global change issues. Course credit may not be received for this course and also GLY 1000 or 2010C. Credit can be received for taking GLY 1000L.
3
IFS2098Global Engagement (Online)

A description is not currently available for this course.
1
IFS2099Biodiversity and the Expansion of Peri-Urban Spaces

The course will discuss the major past environmental, economic and social changes leading to the current development of the green chemistry concept, making critical evaluations of the existing literature on the impact of this operational model in the environment and human well-being, as well as to develop skills in the students for discerning alternatives for innovative green business opportunities from the diversified commercialization of ecofriendly chemical products.
3
IFS2099Finding Ecofriendly Solutions for Global Sustainable Economic Growth

The course will discuss the major past environmental, economic and social changes leading to the current development of the green chemistry concept, making critical evaluations of the existing literature on the impact of this operational model in the environment and human well-being, as well as to develop skills in the students for discerning alternatives for innovative green business opportunities from the diversified commercialization of ecofriendly chemical products.
3
INR2002Introduction To International Relations

This course introduces students to the study of international relations. Major topics include the different actors that participate in international relations and the different goals they pursue, the processes of conflict and cooperation, and recent trends in international politics.
3
INS3003Introduction to International Affairs

This course introduces students to the core questions and concerns of international affairs. The course surveys the many distinct academic disciplines that together contribute to the development of an interdisciplinary understanding of the international system. The course also examines how each of these disciplines understands the international system, the questions it raises, and its strengths and weaknesses. In addition, the course provides an introduction to many of the global issues of interest to international affairs majors, including terrorism, democracy, and globalization. At the end of this course, students have the skills and knowledge required to construct their own specialized plan of study in international affairs.
3
LAH1093Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History

This course is a cross-cultural history of Latin America focusing on women, Native Americans, African-Americans, mestizos, and mulattoes in historical context. The course does not count as credit toward the history major.
3
LAH4470History of the Caribbean

This course focuses on Cuba, Puerto Rico, and other Caribbean societies. European and United States colonialism and local Caribbean forces are studied to help understand the area's social, economic, and political problems and prospects.
3
LIT2000Introduction to Literature

This course introduces students to key terminology, concepts, and methodologies for the study of complex literature. The course provides a groundwork in literary types for non-majors and is also strongly recommended as preparation for upper-level (3000- or 4000-level) coursework in the field.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
2
MAC2233Calculus For Business

This course covers limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus. Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of "C-" or better.
3
MAC2311Calculus With Analytic Geometry I

This course covers polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; anti-derivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAC2312Calculus With Analytic Geometry II

This course covers techniques of integration; applications of integration; series and Taylor series; differential equations. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAC2313Calculus With Analytic Geometry III

This course covers functions of several variables and their graphical representations; vectors; partial derivatives and gradients; optimization; multiple integration; polar, spherical, and cylindrical coordinate systems; curves; vector fields; line integrals; flux integrals; divergence theorem and Stokes' theorem. This course must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
5
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MGF1106Math for Liberal Studies

This course covers set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses.
3
MGF1107Practical Finite Math

This course has a recommended background of two years of high school algebra. Topics include financial mathematics; linear and exponential growth; numbers and number systems; history of mathematics; elementary number theory; voting techniques; graph theory; game theory; geometry; and computer applications.
3
PHI2010Introduction to Philosophy

This course introduces some of the central problems in philosophy. Students also learn how to construct and criticize arguments and develop their own philosophical positions.
3
PHI3882Philosophy in Literature

This course explores how metaphysical and moral ideas function within the structure of selected novels and plays.
3
PHY2048CGeneral Physics A

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how and why things move. Topics covered include kinematics, forces, energy, momentum, oscillations, and thermodynamics. The course is intended for physical science majors and engineers and to be taken as a sequence with General Physics B (PHY 2049C) and Intermediate Modern Physics (PHY 3101). Completing Modern Physics entitles students to a minor in physics. Calculus is used in this course.
5
PHY2049CGeneral Physics B

This course is an introduction to electricity, magnetism, and optics for physical science majors. Calculus is used. Course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory.
5
PSB2000Introduction to Brain and Behavior

This course helps students understand basic nervous system mechanisms that underlie behavior and how systematic observation and experimentation are involved in constructing our understanding of these mechanisms. The course also conveys an appreciation for utilizing critical thinking and scientific knowledge when making important decisions. (Cannot be taken after PSB 3004C.)
3
PSY2012General Psychology

This course is a broad overview covering important psychological principles and findings within the major subfields of psychology, and the basic scientific methods employed. A "bio-psycho-social" approach is emphasized throughout so that all behaviors (including how we think, feel, and act) are discussed in terms of biological, psychological, and social determinants and consequences.
3
REL1300Introduction to World Religions

This course surveys the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.
3
REL3145Gender and Religion

This course considers the impact of gender on religion. Includes cross-cultural studies, theoretical works, and gender issues within religious traditions.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking. The course is required of all majors. The course is also available in hybrid format (mostly online, partly classroom).
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPW3104Readings from Modern Spain

This course provides students, through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3
STA2023Fundamental Business Statistics

This course covers statistical applications in business, involving graphical and numerical descriptions of data, data collection, correlation and simple linear regression, elementary probability, random variables, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for a single sample.
3
WOH1023World History to 1815

This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents of the modern world from the end of the Middle Ages to 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1023. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
WOH1030World History Since 1815

This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents in the modern world since 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1030. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
PS04-9-16: Fall 2016
CourseTitleCredits
ACG2021Intro to Financial Accounting

Introduction to financial accounting concepts. Financial statements and how they reflect business transactions are emphasized.
3
ACG2071Introduction to Managerial Accounting

An introduction to managerial accounting concepts. Credit not allowed for accounting majors.
3
AMH2020History of the US - Since 1877

This course surveys the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present with emphasis on social, economic, and political problems of the 20th century. May not be taken by students with test credit in American history.
3
ART2003CSurvey of Contemporary Art Practices

Demonstration, discussions, and slide/film presentations explore the way artists work in a broad range of media. Emphasis on visual perception and basic art making.
3
AST1002Planets, Stars and Galaxies

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
BSC1005Biology for Non-Majors

Four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LBiology for Non-Majors Lab

May be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

Basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science Lab

This laboratory furnishes tools and techniques used to visualize, quantify, analyze biological phenomena, including experimental design and execution, recording of data, and graphic and statistical analysis of data.
1
CGS2100Micro Computer Applications for BS/EC

May not be applied towards computer science major or minor. Not open to students with credit in CGS 2060. Course enables students in business and economics to become proficient with microcomputer hardware and software applications that are typically used in the workplace. The following topics are covered: hardware concepts, operating systems, word-processing, spreadsheets, databases, networks, Internet, world wide web, multi-media presentations and information systems.
3
CHM1020Chemistry for Liberal Studies

Intended to provide the non-science major with an introductory study of chemistry principles without an extensive use of mathematics. This course is designed for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses. This course is not designed as a preparatory course for CHM 1045C. Major topics include elementary atomic theory, gas laws, states of matter. Credit not allowed for CHM 1020 after taking CHM 1030, 1045C or equivalent.
3
CHM1020LChemistry for Liberal Studies Lab

Laboratory, two (2) hours. No credit allowed after taking CHM 1045C. Laboratory emphasizing major topics from CHM 1020: quantitative observations, properties of matter, separation of mixtures.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of C– or better or placement beyond MAC 1105. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour. This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the departments policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Lab

Introduction to chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, and acids and bases. Safety goggles and a scientific calculator are required for every class
1
CPO2002Intro to Comparative Government and Politics

Addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples from Western democracies, the third world, and current or former communist countries.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconomics

Aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development. Note: final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2023.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconomics

The course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality, poverty; and comparative economic systems. Note: final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2013.
3
ECS4013Economics of Development

TBA in Panama.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

Drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre & Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts. (Prerequisite: ENC1101, Freshman Composition and Rhetoric.)
3
GEA1000World Geography

A regional survey of the human occupation of the face of the earth, local cultures, political systems, and development problems.
3
GEO1330Environmental Science

This course explores the causes of local and global environmental problems and their impacts, including resource use, pollution, ecosystems, and population growth.
3
GEO4340Living in a Hazardous Environment

Types of environmental hazards (natural and human-made) and their effects, techniques for the analysis of risks, strategies for recovering losses.
3
GIS3015Map Analysis

This course is an introduction to the acquisition, processing, and presentation of cartographic data.
3
GLY1030Environmental Issues in Geology

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
HUN1201Science of Nutrition

Elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
IFS2098Global Engagement (online) (required of all freshmen)

Study your study-abroad country through first-hand encounters and engagement. The coursework gives you the opportunity to study your country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with your own through actively participating in cultural experiences. In addition to weekly reflective assignments, the course will ask you to choose a specific custom to report on such as looking at race and social class through the football and cricket sporting cultures in England or the significance of the patriarchal society through the courtship dances in Italy.
1
IFS2099Physics of Biosustainability

The course will discuss the major past environmental, economic and social changes leading to the current development of the green chemistry concept, making critical evaluations of the existing literature on the impact of this operational model in the environment and human well-being, as well as to develop skills in the students for discerning alternatives for innovative green business opportunities from the diversified commercialization of ecofriendly chemical products.
3
IFS2099Panamas Religious Melting Pot

The course will discuss the major past environmental, economic and social changes leading to the current development of the green chemistry concept, making critical evaluations of the existing literature on the impact of this operational model in the environment and human well-being, as well as to develop skills in the students for discerning alternatives for innovative green business opportunities from the diversified commercialization of ecofriendly chemical products.
3
INR2002Intro to International Relations

Introduces students to the study of international relations. Major topics include the different actors that participate in international relations and the different goals they pursue, the processes of conflict and cooperation, and recent trends in international politics.
3
INS3003Introduction to International Affairs

This course introduces students to the core questions and concerns of international affairs. The course surveys the many distinct academic disciplines that together contribute to the development of an interdisciplinary understanding of the international system. The course also examines how each of these disciplines understands the international system, the questions it raises, and its strengths and weaknesses. In addition, the course provides an introduction to many of the global issues of interest to international affairs majors, including terrorism, democracy, and globalization. At the end of this course, students have the skills and knowledge required to construct their own specialized plan of study in international affairs.
3
LAH1093Latin America: A Cross-Cultural History

A cross-cultural history of Latin America focusing on women, Native Americans, African-Americans, mestizos, and mulattoes in historical context. Course will not count as credit toward the history major.
3
LAH4470History of the Caribbean

Cuba, Puerto Rico, and other Caribbean societies are the subjects of this course. European and United States colonialism and local Caribbean forces are studied to help understand the areas social, economic, and political problems and prospects.
3
LIT2000Introduction to Literature

This course introduces students to key terminology, concepts, and methodologies for the study of complex literature. The course provides a groundwork in literary types for non-majors and is also strongly recommended as preparation for upper-level (3000 or 4000-level) coursework in the field.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. On basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105. Review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

Trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivres theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
2
MAC1140Precalculus Algebra

May be taken concurrently with MAC 1114. Credit must be reduced to two (2) hours for students having a grade of C- or better in MAC 1141. (See Credit Note 2 above.) Functions and graphs, with emphasis on higher degree polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; solution of linear systems, matrix methods, determinants; sequences and series, induction, and the binomial theorem. Applications, approximation, and methods of proof.
3
MAC2233Calculus for Business

Not open to students who have credit in MAC 2311 with a grade of C- or better. Limits, continuity, first and higher derivatives, and the differential, with applications to graphing, rates of change, and optimization methods; techniques of integration and applications; introduction to multivariate calculus.
3
MAC2311Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

Polynomial, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; first and second derivatives and their interpretations; definition and interpretation of the integral; differentiation rules; implicit differentiation; applications of the derivative; antiderivatives; fundamental theorem of calculus. This course must must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAC2312Calculus with Analytic Geometry II

Techniques of integration; applications of integration; series and Taylor series; differential equations. This course must must be taken for reduced credit by students with prior credit for some of the content.
4
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

Behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

A required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
MAT1033Intermediate Algebra

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
MGF1106Math for Liberal Arts

Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Course is not intended for students whose programs require precalculus or calculus courses. Set theory; symbolic logic; counting principles; permutations and combinations; probability; statistics; geometry; applications and history of mathematics.
3
MGF1107Practical Finite Math

Recommended background: two years of high school algebra. Topics will include financial mathematics; linear and exponential growth; numbers and number systems; history of mathematics; elementary number theory; voting techniques; graph theory; game theory; geometry; and computer applications.
3
PHI2010Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to some of the central problems in philosophy. Students will also learn how to construct and criticize arguments, and develop their own philosophical positions.
3
PHI3882Philosophy in Literature

An exploration of how metaphysical and moral ideas function within the structure of selected novels and plays.
3
PHY2048CPhysics Studio A

An introduction to mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics for physical science majors, designed to be taken as a sequence with PHY 2049C. Calculus is used. Course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory. A student who has taken PHY 2053C or an equivalent course may take PHY 2048 rather than 2048C. (Must sign up for PHY 2048L.)
5
PHY2049CPhysics Studio B

An introduction to electricity, magnetism, and optics for physical science majors. Calculus is used. Course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory. A student who has taken PHY 2054C or an equivalent course may tak e PHY 2049 rather than 2049C.(Must sign up for PHY 2049L.)
5
PSB2000Intro to Brain and Behavior

A study of the basic principles of brain functions and how they relate to animal and human behavior. (Cannot be taken after PSB 3004.)
3
PSY2012General Psychology

An introduction to the field of psychology covering such topics as learning, perception, intelligence, personality, and social behavior.
3
REL1300Intro to World Religions

A survey of the major living religious traditions of the world, with attention to their origins in the ancient world and their classic beliefs and practices.
3
REL3145Gender and Religion

A consideration of the impact of gender on religion. Includes cross-cultural studies, theoretical works, and gender issues within religious traditions.
3
SPC2608Public Speaking

This course covers both the principles of and the practical experience of public speaking.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students will read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1130, and/or 2200. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

TBA in PanamaThe course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students will read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1102, 1130, and/or 2200.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students will read short stories, poems, and articles, and will write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1130. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
SPW3104Readings from Modern Spain

This course provides students through a variety of readings and written and oral activities with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3
STA2023Fundamental Business Statistics

Statistical applications in business, involving graphical and numerical descriptions of data, data collection, elementary probability, random variables, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for a single sample.
3
SYG2010Social Problems

This course represents a study of various contemporary social problems in an urbanized society which may include such topics as education, the family, politics, the economy, race relations, drug use and alcoholism, over-population, and other issues.
3
WOH1023World History to 1815

A description is not currently available for this course.
3
WOH1030World History Since 1815

This liberal studies course deals with the origins and development of political, economic, social, and intellectual antecedents in the modern world since 1815. Students who have previous college credit in Western civilization courses covering the same general chronological period cannot receive credit for WOH 1030. May not be taken by students with test credit in European history.
3
VS04-9-17: Fall 2017
CourseTitleCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology

This course is an introduction to modern anthropological archaeology. The course introduces students to the interdisciplinary scientific approaches employed in contemporary archaeological research and provides students with an overview of the origins and evolution of human social and economic systems.
3
ANT2100LIntroduction Archaeology Lab

The course is conducted as a hands-on laboratory in archaeological methodology. Each week, students have a series of laboratory exercises designed to teach specific analytical techniques, including paleozoological analysis, paleobotanical analysis, geophysical prospecting techniques, and GIS.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. The course provides the building blocks necessary for a student to gain a strong foundation in general biology. Topics covered provide an overview of biological processes and function at the molecular, cellular and organismal level.
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

This course introduces basic chemistry, energetics, metabolism, and cellular organization; molecular genetics and information flow; animal and plant function.
1
CHM1020Chemistry for Liberal Studies

This course introduces basic chemical principles without an extensive use of mathematics and illustrates with applications in health, energy, and the environment. The course strives to show chemistry as a human endeavor that provides insight into the natural world and informs our decisions as citizens and consumers. Specific topics vary by semester. Designed as a course for students who wish to fulfill the liberal studies science requirement with chemistry and will take no further chemistry courses, not as a preparatory course for CHM 1045. Credit not allowed for CHM 1020 after taking CHM 1032, 1045, or equivalent.
3
CHM1020LChemistry for Liberal Studies Laboratory

This laboratory emphasizes major topics from CHM 1020 relating chemistry concepts and techniques to everyday life experiences. This laboratory-based course meets two hours a week. No credit allowed after taking CHM 1045.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course includes topics such as chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students taking CHM 1045 after taking CHM 1020 and/or CHM 1032 may register for reduced credit, as indicated in the department's policy on reduced credit.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Laboratory

This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases.
1
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government & Politics

This course addresses government institutions and current political parties throughout the world, as well as theories that explain similarities and differences among countries. Topics may include electoral systems, parliamentary systems, causes of political change, democratization, political culture, ideologies, and economic and social policy. Examples are drawn from Western democracies and developing countries.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

This course is a survey of the discipline for people taking only one economics course. Historical perspective and major principles of theory are presented. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major nor the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconimics (online)

This course explores aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconimics (online)

This course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality and poverty; and comparative economic systems.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

This course includes drafting and writing of expository essays and a journal for a total of 7,000 words. May not be taken by students with credit in ENC 1149. No auditors.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, and Context

This course focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
GEB3213Business Communications

This course is designed to help business students develop the writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career.
3
HUM2210Humanities: Pre-History to Late Antiquity

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from prehistoric times to about 400 A.D.
3
HUM2235From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.
3
HUM3930Special Topics: Culture & Civilization of Spain

Spain is a complex and vivacious country with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, culture and society of the different people who have contributed to the formation of the current European nation from its origin to the present. The students will learn about Spain not only through readings and lectures, but also, and most importantly, through real life experiences, such as excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, monuments, museums, churches and other places of interest. We will also study the fundamental importance of Spanish food culture as a socio-cultural element worthy of serious analysis. This course will also make use of select films to enhance our analysis of Spanish culture. This course counts as a Core Course for the Iberian Studies minor. This course may be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.
3
HUN1201Science of Nutrition

This course focuses on the elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
IFS2099Crossing the Atlantic: Hemingway in Spain; Lorca in Americas

Federico García Lorca and Ernest Hemingway are two of the most internationally recognized literary and cultural figures of the 20th century. That is, not only are they viewed with great interest and even division and controversy in their birth countries of Spain and the United States respectively, but they continue to cast a long shadow across the globe and especially over the Atlantic. Furthermore, not only did each of these two compelling figures leave a deep footprint in the other´s country, but they were also influenced and greatly inspired by the socio-cultural patrimony of the other´s homeland. By studying and analyzing Lorca in America and Hemingway in Spain students will explore an inter-cultural journey that reaches the core of how many Spaniards view America and how many Americans view Spain to this day. In this course we will engage, explore and envision Lorca in America and Hemingway in Spain within the enriching comparative context regarding a number of points of analysis: socio-cultural identity and customs, the environment, ethnicity, sexual identity, religion, geography, the artistic merit versus the ethical complexities of the bullfight, human rights and the cruelties of warfare.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

This course is a review of algebraic operations, equations and inequalities; functions and functional notation; graphs; inverse functions; linear, quadratic, rational function; absolute value; radicals; exponential and logarithmic functions; system of equations and inequalities; applications. On the basis of test scores the student may be required to take a community college course before MAC 1105.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

This course covers trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivre's theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
2
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

This course covers behavioral concepts, techniques, and applications for managing human resources in all types of organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course provides an overview of the environments, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; the globalization of business and associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and the orientations, strategies, and tactics appropriate for international business success.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

This course is a required prerequisite for all marketing courses. Gives the student an understanding of the decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1124, and/or 2220. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1124, and/or 2220 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish I

This course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students read short stories, poems, and articles, and write extended compositions and papers in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124 or be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

This course completes the intermediate Spanish skills sequence and finishes the review of the grammar sequence begun in SPN 2220. Students deepen their functional skills in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, and gain an overview of Hispanic culture in various countries. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its applications to compositions. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3400.
3
SPN3350Spanish for Heritage Speakers

This course offers intensive Spanish for heritage speakers who have had little or no formal training in the language. Writing skills are emphasized over oral communication.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish.
3
SPN3440Language and Culture in Business

This intermediate-level language course is aimed at raising cross-cultural awareness in international business. It is also designed to better prepare students to meet the challenges of a global economy.
3
SPN4540Regional Cultural Studies

This course provides students with exposure to texts and cultural productions from specific regions of Latin America, Spain, or the Latino enclaves in the U.S. Texts may include historical documents, legends and myths, poetry, fiction, essays, or popular music. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Duplicate registration allowed in the same semester.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema

This course is a study of the films, movements and directors of Hispanic cinema. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. Taught in English.
3
SPW3104Readings from Modern Spain

This course provides students, through a variety of readings and written and oral activities, with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3
VS04-9-16: Fall 2016
CourseTitleCredits
ANT2100Introduction to Archaeology

The course is designed specifically for first and second year undergraduates with no experience in anthropology or archaeology. In this course we will use the FSU Valencia Study Center archaeological remains as part of the class as well as the many interesting sites in Valencia. The main goal of the course is to provide students with an introduction to contemporary archaeology theory and methodology. The secondary goals of the course are to introduce the multi-disciplinary scientific approaches employed in modern archaeology, and to provide students with a general overview of the origin and development of human, social and economic systems. Additional costs will only include public transportation within the area of Valencia during class excursions.
3
BSC1005General Biology For Non-Majors

Four selected topics in contemporary biology.
3
BSC1005LGeneral Biology Lab

May be taken concurrently with lecture or subsequent to completion of lecture with passing grade.
1
BSC2010Biological Science I

BSC 2010-5 is an introductory biology course designed for those interested in pursuing a carrer in life sciences. It will cover significant principles in biology from the chemical basis of life to the interactions of living organisms with one another and their environment. The course will focus on the basis of life. Areas of study will include: chemistry of living organisms, energetics, cell structure and organization, cellular metabolism, genetics and information flow, and physiology. S
3
BSC2010LBiological Science I Laboratory

Biological Science I Laboratory (1). Prerequisites: CHM 1045 and CHM 1045L. Corequisite: BSC 2010. This laboratory furnishes tools and techniques used to visualize, quantify, and analyze biological phenomena, including experimental design and execution, recording of data, and graphic and statistical analysis of data.
1
CHM1045General Chemistry I

This course is taught in English at the Polytechnic University of Valencia for FSU credit (www.upv.es). This course is intended for science majors who will take further chemistry courses. It is a prerequisite to General Chemistry II (CHM 1046) and more advanced chemistry courses. It will count for liberal studies credit. Prerequisite: MAC 1105 with a grade of C? or better or placement beyond MAC 1105. Topics include chemical symbols, formulas, and equations; states of matter; reactivity in aqueous solution; electronic structure, bonding, and molecular geometry. Theory will be matched with practical exercises and students are expected to play an active role in the different activities that will be proposed.
3
CHM1045LGeneral Chemistry I Lab

This course is taught in English at the Polytechnic University of Valencia for FSU credit (www.upv.es). Corequisite: CHM 1045. This laboratory offers an introduction to quantitative techniques and to the chemical laboratory. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic spectra, gases, as well as acids and bases. Safety goggles (provided in Valencia) and a scientific calculator (bring or buy in Valencia) are required for every class. Lab meets at different schedules during the semester without conflicting with other classes. Additional Costs: A scientific calculator (bring or buy in Valencia) is required for every class. Additional costs will include public transportation within the area of Valencia during class, and the purchase of a lab coat (approximately 15 Euros).
1
CPO2002Introduction to Comparative Government & Politics

The objective of this course is twofold: first of all, to show the main key features of different political systems around the world. These features will include political institutions, policies, political history and philosophy. Special emphasis will be placed in specific European individual countries and the European Union institutions. The second aspect to consider is the way theory applies to reality. Theory will be matched with practical exercises and students are expected to play an active role in the different activities that will be proposed. They will include debates and follow-up of contemporary politics. The course could include visits to political institutions in the city and, agenda permitting, meetings with a political representative or person active in the political scenario. Politics is not just something to study, but an issue to know and to exercise during your life as citizen.
3
ECO2000Introduction to Economics (online)

Economics is the study of how people make choices due to scarcity of resources. The major objectives of this online course are to 1) develop a basic understanding of the economic way of thinking, 2) investigate the important factors that cause economic growth for a country, 3) apply economic analysis to the political process, and 4) develop the key ingredients to sound personal finance decision making. Not to be taken by students who have had or who must take ECO 2013 and 2023. Not applicable to the economics major or the economics minor.
3
ECO2013Principles of Macroeconimics (online)

This online course covers aggregate economics and national income determination, money and monetary theory, present macroeconomic conditions, and aggregative policy alternatives; theory of international trade and the balance of payments; economic growth and development. Note: final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2023.
3
ECO2023Principles of Microeconimics (online)

The online course covers consumption, production, and resource allocations considered from a private and social point of view; microeconomic problems and policy alternatives; economics of inequality, poverty; and comparative economic systems. Note: final exam is given at the same time as ECO 2013.
3
ENC1101Freshman Composition and Rhetoric

We will focus on developing clarity of thought—perception and analysis—through writing about our place within communities. First we will write about who we are and how different we stand out from the Valencia that surrounds us. Then we will begin to know the people of our new Valencian community by interviewing and writing about a particular person. Next we will write about an aspect of the larger community of Valencia, but still focusing on the people of that subset. Finally we will form micro-communities from among our numbers to investigate in a multi-media format, some aspect of the many layered artistic communities of Valencia. We will hold as many classes in the community of Valencia (outside of our classroom) as possible in order to provide the stimuli for writing.
3
ENC2135Research, Genre, Context

ENC2135 is the second of two required composition courses. While continuing to stress the importance of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills emphasized in ENC1101, as well as the importance of using writing as a recursive process involving invention, drafting, collaboration, revision, rereading, and editing to clearly and effectively communicate ideas for specific purposes, occasions, and audiences, ENC2135 focuses on teaching students research skills that allow them to effectively incorporate outside sources in their writing and to compose in a variety of genres for specific contexts.
3
GEB3213Business Communication

This course will be taught including visits with Spanish and other European students from local universities. The focus of this course will be intercultural business communication and public speaking. We will also work on writing, verbal, and interpersonal skills that are necessary for a successful business career in the United States (as well as overseas). We will also experience and document Valencia, Spain and Europe from a personal point of view; as you travel throughout the country and continent, you will observe the differences and similarities of Valencian, Spanish and European culture. We’ll talk about those differences, and why they exist. We’ll do various speeches, carry on class discussions and do various writing assignments to help you function in different cultures in whatever business you work in. This course satisfies the Oral Communication Competency requirement.
3
HUM2020The Art of Being Human: Examining the Human Condition Through Literature, Art and Film

This course offers an introduction to the thought, literature, and arts of Western culture from Antiquity to the present.
3
HUM2235From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment

Introduction to the thought, values, and arts of Western culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Additional costs will only include public transportation within the area of Valencia for class excursions.
3
HUM3930Humanities: Special Topics: Culture & Civilization of Spain

Spain is a complex and vivacious country with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, culture and society of the different people who have contributed to the formation of the current European nation from its origin to the present. The students will learn about Spain not only through readings and lectures, but also, and most importantly, through real life experiences, such as excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, monuments, museums, churches and other places of interest. We will also study the fundamental importance of Spanish food culture as a socio-cultural element worthy of serious analysis. This course will also make use of select films to enhance our analysis of Spanish culture. This course counts as a Core Course for the Iberian Studies minor. This course may be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.
3
HUN1201Science of Nutrition

Elements of nutrition and factors influencing the ability of individuals to maintain good nutrition status.
3
IFS2098Global Engagement (online) (required of all freshmen)

Study your study-abroad country through first-hand encounters and engagement. The coursework gives you the opportunity to study your country's unique customs, values, and traditions and compare it with your own through actively participating in cultural experiences. In addition to weekly reflective assignments, the course will ask you to choose a specific custom to report on such as looking at race and social class through the football and cricket sporting cultures in England or the significance of the patriarchal society through the courtship dances in Italy.
1
IFS2099Crossing the Atlantic: Hemingway in Spain; Lorca in Americas

Federico García Lorca and Ernest Hemingway are two of the most internationally recognized literary and cultural figures of the 20th century. That is, not only are they viewed with great interest and even division and controversy in their birth countries of Spain and the United States respectively, but they continue to cast a long shadow across the globe and especially over the Atlantic. Furthermore, not only did each of these two compelling figures leave a deep footprint in the other´s country, but they were also influenced and greatly inspired by the socio-cultural patrimony of the other´s homeland. By studying and analyzing Lorca in America and Hemingway in Spain students will explore an inter-cultural journey that reaches the core of how many Spaniards view America and how many Americans view Spain to this day. In this course we will engage, explore and envision Lorca in America and Hemingway in Spain within the enriching comparative context regarding a number of points of analysis: socio-cultural identity and customs, the environment, ethnicity, sexual identity, religion, geography, the artistic merit versus the ethical complexities of the bullfight, human rights and the cruelties of warfare.
3
MAC1105College Algebra

THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT (in English) AT THE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY OF VALENCIA (www.upv.es). The course will cover seven main objectives: Functions and functional notation; domains and ranges of functions; graphs of functions and relations; operations of functions, equations and inequalities; linear, inverse, quadratic, and rational functions; trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic properties, functions, and equations. Recommended background: two years of high school algebra.
3
MAC1114Analytic Trigonometry

Trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs; identities and conditional equations; solution of triangles; trigonometric form of complex numbers; DeMoivres theorem and nth roots; introduction to plane vectors.
2
MAN3240Organizational Behavior

We will be learning about the factors that influence the behavior of people in organizations. These influences include: personality, values and attitudes, motivation, emotional intelligence, and culture and international context among others. In class these abstract concepts will be made more concrete by viewing real cases and films that vividly depict what we are studying in the behavior of the characters. Outside the classroom there will be additional opportunity to observe people in action in the international context of Valencian life: in its neighborhoods, on its streets, and in its markets, shops and cafes. In addition, some class time will be devoted to actually practicing and acquiring the fundamental social skills that allow us to manage our own behavior and influence the behavior of others in organizations.
3
MAN3600Multinational Business Operations

This course involves an examination of: (1) the environment, markets, institutions, challenges, strategies, and operations of international and cross-cultural business; (2) the globalization of business and the associated challenges posed for the competitiveness of the modern enterprise; and (3) overview of orientations, strategies and tactics appropriated for international business success. A component of the course will be visits to various cultural, business, and government sites in Valencia. There will be some additional costs for subway fees for this course.
3
MAR3023Basic Marketing Concepts

Gives the student an understanding of the key marketing decision areas and the ability to utilize marketing concepts to make business decisions. Study of the marketing functions -- products/services, pricing, promotion, and distribution. Introduction to marketing management and strategy. Topics covered within the course include marketing research, consumer and organizational buying behavior, market segmentation, and personal selling. Special emphasis will be placed upon international and cross-cultural aspects of marketing, including visits and Spanish guest lecturers. There may be some minor additional costs for this course for museum entry fees, extra subway fees, and so forth. Introductory course to marketing.
3
SPN1120Elementary Spanish I

This course is the first of a three-semester sequence of courses for students with no prior knowledge of the Spanish language, either at the high-school or native-speaker level. The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students will read short texts and write paragraphs and short compositions in Spanish. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1121, 1130, and/or 2200. May not be taken by native speakers. Some sections may be computer-assisted.
4
SPN1121Elementary Spanish II

The course emphasizes oral communication and grammatical expertise, as well as listening comprehension. Students will read short texts, poems, and write compositions in Spanish. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1102, 1130, and/or 2200.
4
SPN2220Intermediate Spanish

This is the third of a three-semester sequence of courses designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of Spanish. The course emphasizes the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. Basic grammar skills are also introduced. Students will make oral presentations, read short texts, and write briefs. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 1120, 1121, and/or 1124. May not be taken by native speakers.
4
SPN2240Intermediate Spanish II

Students should achieve a level of conversation in which they can discuss things beyond concrete physical needs and on a beginning level of abstraction. This course will be completely whole-language, contextualized, proficiency-based instruction with extensive use of TPR-S. Typical teaching techniques will include: group work; pair work, collaborative activities, problem-solving tasks and incorporating the city of Valencia into the classroom. Prerequisite: SPN 2220 or equivalent. This course is a prerequisite to SPN 3332 and SPN 3333. May not be taken concurrently with SPN 2220, and/or 3332. Students may not take SPN 2240 and SPN 3332 concurrently. May not be taken by native speakers. Additional costs will only include public transportation within the area of Valencia during class excursions.
3
SPN3300Spanish Grammar and Composition

This course covers the theory and practice of Spanish grammar and its application to compositions. It can be taken concurrently with SPN 3201. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish. In this course, students will deepen their understanding of Hispanic culture and the development of communicative proficiency and accuracy in the use of the language. This course will take advantage of the dynamic city of Valencia, Spanish current events, and some film viewing to enhance the student’s context of using proper grammar and language composition.
3
SPN3400Spanish Reading and Conversation

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in SPN 2240. This course develops communicative proficiency and accuracy in both reading and writing Spanish. Can be taken concurrently with SPN 3300. Not open to native or heritage speakers of Spanish. In this course, students will practice constant conversation with Spanish natives, as well as use frequent and very actual readings related to day to day Valencia and Spain events, newspapers and much more. We will also learn about Hispanic culture take advantage of the dynamic city of Valencia.
3
SPN3440Language and Culture in Business

Co-requisite SPN 3333 or permission of instructor. This is an intermediate-level language course aimed at raising cross-cultural awareness in international business. It also is designed to better prepare students to meet the challenges of our global economy and to enhance your ability to relate to a business environment in an increasingly important commercial language both in the U.S. and abroad. It seeks to provide you with a foundation of the necessary business vocabulary. We will visit different Valencian businesses and institutions, where we will learn and apply the Language and Culture in Business. The course will be conducted in Spanish and we will also include translating and interpreting activities. NOTE: Students should have a very solid command of the Spanish language for this course.
3
SPN4540Regional Cultural Studies

Students should have a very solid command of the Spanish language for this course. Prerequisite SPN 3300 or SPN 3400, or permission of the instructor. Valencia is a region with a rich and hybrid cultural background. In this course, we will study the history, popular/folkloric culture and society of La Comunidad Valenciana. The students will learn about the historical, social, political, sports, and popular culture of one of Spain´s most important regions. Inside and outside of class we will explore historical documents, legends and myths, food and wine, folkloric/ popular music, sport events and the most important festivals in La Comunidad Valenciana. There will be excursions and visits to the actual historical sites, towns, monuments, museums and other places of interest pertaining to the course.
3
SPT3391Hispanic Cinema

In this course we will study the development, history and enormous variety of Hispanic cinema. While there will be some emphasis placed on Spanish directors such as Saura, Almodóvar, Bigas Luna, Amenabar etc., this course will also establish a cross-cultural connection with select films from other Spanish-speaking countries. One of the primary goals of the course will be to analyze why and how cinema is often a mirror and recorder of social issues and collective and/or individual values in addition to serving as a vehicle of cultural and artistic expression. The course may be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours. Course applies towards the major and minor credit in Spanish, the Area IV Humanities/Fine Arts requirement, the minor in Film Studies, and is a Core Course for the minor in Iberian Studies; however, it may not be applied toward major or minor literature credit in either Spanish or Latin American and Caribbean studies. Taught in English. ***NO TEXTBOOK IS REQUIRED, however students are required to pay nominal photocopying costs for class readings. Additional costs include €25 for film analysis project and public transportation in Valencia during class excursions.
3
SPW3104Readings From Modern Spain

This course provides students through a variety of readings and written and oral activities with a fundamental knowledge of the critical issues related to modern Spain from 1700 to the present.
3

*/**/***/****/^ Courses followed by these symbols denote cross listing. Students may take one or the other, but not both.

Money Matters

The biggest factor in deciding when and where to study abroad is often the financial aspect. In fact, too many students assume they cannot afford to participate, missing out on an invaluable opportunity because they are not aware of alternative methods of funding. The Financial Assistance Coordinator at International Programs (IP) is dedicated to helping students through the financial aid application process by conducting financial aid workshops on a regular basis in addition to meeting personally with each student needing assistance. Students who have received some form of financial aid throughout their collegiate careers, as well as those completely new to the process, receive expert care every step of the way. We also help concerned parents! Additionally, students are strongly encouraged to contact the Financial Aid Office at their home school as early as possible. Finally, Florida State students will find additional helpful information on the FSU Financial Aid website.

Florida Bright Futures

Florida Bright Futures scholarship funds may be used toward a semester abroad. Florida Bright Futures Scholarship funds are available during the fall and spring terms only. Students must complete a FAFSA to be eligible to receive Bright Futures funds for which they qualify. If a student receives Florida Bright Futures scholarship funds and wishes to defer a portion of his or her program fees, the student must complete the fee deferment request form provided at the time of acceptance.

The Florida Department of Education website contains additional information concerning eligibility, renewal criteria, appeal processes and legislative updates. Additional information may also be available through the Florida State Office of Financial Aid.

Credit Hours Bright Futures Academic
$103 Per Credit Hour
Bright Futures Medallion
$77 Per Credit Hour
6 $618 $462
7 $721 $539
8 $824 $616
9 $927 $693
10 $1030 $770
11 $1133 $847
12 $1236 $924
13 $1339 $1001
14 $1442 $1078
15 $1545 $1155
16 $1648 $1232
17 $1751 $1309
18 $1854 1386

Quick Links

Florida Prepaid

Students receiving Florida Prepaid tuition, local fees and/or dorm benefits, may defer a portion of their Program Fee against Florida Prepaid funds. Completing and submitting the fee deferment request form will allow IP to bill Florida Prepaid and apply these funds toward the program fee balance. Completion and submission of the fee deferment request form allows this process to occur.

Students may obtain the deferment form by selecting Deferment from the menu above.

To use a Florida Prepaid dorm account during a summer term, the purchaser of the Prepaid account must send a letter authorizing the use of the benefit. Letters should be mailed to: Florida Prepaid, 1804 Hermitage Blvd., Suite 210, Tallahassee, FL 32308. For more information, contact them at 1-800-552-4723.

Note: Eligibility for summer financial aid requires enrollment in at least six credits.

How much is my Florida Prepaid worth if I study abroad?

# of Credits Enrolled FPP Tuition FPP Local Fees* Dorm Rate
1 $115.08 $34.73 $3240.00
2 $230.16 $69.46 Per Term**
3 $345.24 $104.19
4 $460.32 $138.92
5 $575.40 $173.65
6 $690.48 $208.38
7 $805.56 $243.11
8 $920.64 $277.84
9 $1035.72 $312.57
10 $1150.80 $347.30
11 $1265.88 $382.03
12 $1380.96 $416.76
13 $1496.04 $451.49
14 $1611.12 $486.22
15 $1726.20 $520.95
  • * Please note the above tuition and fees are subject to change at any time.
  • ** Contact FPP for authorization instructions to use dorm account during a summer term: 850-309-1660 ext. 4134

Quick Links

Scholarship & Discount Opportunities

Florida State University has joined the Generation Study Abroad campaign sponsored by the Institute for International Education, committing to a goal of doubling the number of our study abroad participants by 2020. We are proud to be part of this pledge to undertake ambitious actions in order to increase the number of students who study abroad with Florida State!

As part of this commitment, International Programs has launched a $175,000 Generation Study Abroad Scholarships program, Which includes $70,000 worth of new scholarships as well as two existing scholarships being incorporated into the Generation Study Abroad Scholarships program.

Psychology In London Scholarship

This scholarship was established to encourage participation in the FSU Psychology in London summer program. Florida State degree-seeking students who have an overall GPA of 3.25 or above may apply for this need and merit-based scholarship.

Brooks Rogers Memorial Scholarship

Florida State degree-seeking students enrolled full-time in the College of Arts & Sciences or in the College of Fine Arts, who have an overall GPA of 2.85 or above may apply for this need-based scholarship. Preference is given to students studying Art History or the Humanities.

Generation Study Abroad Critical Language Scholarship

Florida State undergraduate degree-seeking students who are majoring or minoring in Chinese or Russian, and who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship. Scholarships are available summer sessions in Tianjin or Moscow. Amounts may be up to 50% of the program fee and are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad First Generation College Student Scholarship

Florida State undergraduate degree-seeking students who are the first in their family to attend college and who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship. Scholarships are available fall, spring, and summer sessions. Amounts may be up to 50% of the program fee and are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad International Programs Achievement Scholarship

Florida State degree-seeking students with an overall GPA of 3.8 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship, available fall, spring and summer sessions. Amounts are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad International Programs Anniversary Scholarship

Florida State degree-seeking students who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this need and merit-based scholarship, which is intended to help increase the number of Florida State students who study abroad. Scholarships are available fall, spring, and summer sessions; and amounts are determined based on the applicant pool.

Generation Study Abroad STEM Student Scholarship

Florida State undergraduate degree-seeking students who are majoring in science, technology, engineering, or math, and who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this meritbased scholarship. Scholarships are available fall, spring, and summer sessions. Amounts may be up to 50% of the program fee and are determined based on the applicant pool.

Other International Programs Scholarship Opportunities

Minority Scholarship

To help more minorities study abroad, we offer a Minority Scholarship to degree-seeking Florida State ethnic minority students with an overall GPA of 2.5 or above. There are two $5,000 awards each semester, to be applied toward a fall or spring program in Florence, London, Panama City or Valencia.

Spring Break Scholarship

IP offers a limited number of scholarships for students participating in FSU IP Spring Break programs. Applicants must be Florida State degree-seeking students with an overall GPA of 3.8 or above and no demonstrated financial need or an overall GPA of 3.5 or above with demonstrated financial need. Scholarships will be up to 25% of the program fee.

William Cullen Klein Memorial Scholarship

This scholarship was established in memory of Cullen Klein, a talented linguist double-majoring in Spanish and Chinese. His family established the scholarship in his memory to help open the world to other students through studying abroad on the FSU Tianjin summer program. Florida State degree-seeking students who have an overall GPA of 3.5 or above may apply for this merit-based scholarship.

Scholarship Application Deadlines

Term Deadline
Spring 2017 September 7, 2016
Spring Break 2017 November 2, 2016
Summer 2017 December 7, 2016
Fall 2017 April 5, 2017

Scholarships Administered by Other FSU Departments

For information about study abroad scholarships administered by other FSU departments, view the following links:

Ada Belle Winthrop-King Scholarships

Available through the Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics. Contact the department for guidelines.

Audrey Wilson Florence Travel Scholarships

Humanities majors participating in the Florence Program may apply for Audrey Wilson Florence Travel Scholarships. Apply through the director of the FSU humanities program Contact the Program in Interndisciplinary Humanities at 850-644-9121.

Bess Ward Honors Thesis Award

Florida State University liberal studies Honor students and Honors in the Major students may apply for a Bess Ward Honors Travel Scholarship. For more information, see the Honors Program website.

The College of Arts & Sciences Study Abroad Scholarship sponsored by the International Enrichment Fund

Available through the College of Arts and Sciences students who meet certain requirements and are attending an FSU International Program (more information available on the scholarship's website).

Scholarship List

General listing of scholarships that may be available for international study. These scholarships are available to both FSU students and Non-FSU students.

Related Materials

External Links

Study Abroad Loans

Additional Discount Opportunities

Students who have completed 15 or more credit hours on programs administered by the IP office, earning at least a 3.0 average or above in course work at the international location(s), are eligible for discounts for subsequent IP programs. Discounts are $500 for summer sessions or $1,000 for fall or spring semesters. Note: These savings are built into the program fees for First Year Abroad program students.

Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute

The Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute, known as FLORICA, was created in 1986, authorized by the Florida Legislature in 1987, and formalized by an agreement signed by the State University System of Florida, the Florida Community College System and the Council of Rectors of Costa Rican Universities (CONARE). Since its beginning, FLORICA has been administered for Costa Rica by CONARE and on behalf of the State of Florida by The Florida State University and Valencia College, with co-directors appointed from each institution.

FLORICA has strong credibility both in Florida and Costa Rica as a stimulus and a catalyst. The Institute has interfaced broadly in Costa Rica with public and private institutions and agencies including all the public universities.

Costa Rican citizens who have applied and been accepted in a Florida public university or community college may apply for out-of-state tuition waivers through the Florida-Costa Rica Institute Non-Resident Tuition Exemption Program.

Co-Directors

Florida State University
Gisela R. Fisher
Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute
Florida State University
282 Champions Way
University Center Building A,
Office Suite A5500
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420
Phone: 850.644.7217
Fax: 850.644.8817
Email: gfisher@fsu.edu

In Partnership with Valencia College
Rocky Blesso
Florida-Costa Rica Linkage Institute
Valencia College
P.O. Box 3028
Orlando, FL 32802
Phone: 407.582.5287
Email: hblesso@valenciacollege.com

Florida-France Linkage Institute

The Florida-France Linkage Institute was created by the Legislature of the State of Florida in 1989. Over the years, the scope of activities and outreach of the Institute have grown considerably; in Florida, in France, and in the départments of the French Caribbean. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is administered by The University of South Florida in partnership with Florida State University and Miami-Dade College. The educational mission of each of these institutions lends an unusual and unique diversity to the joint co-sponsorship of the Florida-France Linkage Institute. The Florida-France Linkage Institute is supported on behalf of France by the office of the French Consulate-General in Miami.

The Florida-France Linkage Institute utilizes the resources of the State University System and the Community College System. The Institute also serves as a clearinghouse for inter-institutional and community networking to bring projects and activities to college and university campuses.

Thus, the Florida-France Linkage Institute places a high priority on its mission to serve as a facilitator for international tourism, trade, economic development, and business for the Office of Tourism, Trade and Economic Development (OTTED).

For more information about tuition waivers for the Florida-France Linkage Institute and to apply: http://www.usf.edu/world/centers/florida-france/index.aspx

Co-Directors

University of South Florida
Christine Probes
Florida-France Linkage Institute
International Affairs Center
University of South Florida
4202 E. Fowler Ave., CPR107
Tampa, FL 33620-5550
Phone: (813) 974-3104
Fax: (813) 974-4613
Email: probes@usf.edu

In Partnership with Florida State University
Ceil Bare
Florida-France Linkage Institute
Florida State University
A5500 University Center
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420
Phone: (850) 644-1283
Email: cbare@fsu.edu

In Partnership with Miami-Dade College
Christina Florez
Florida-France Linkage Institute
Miami-Dade College
300 NE 2nd Ave., Room 3116
Miami, FL 33132
Phone: (305) 237-3485
Email: cflorez1@mdc.edu

Technology Fee (Not included in program fees)

Florida State assesses a technology fee which is NOT included in the International Programs fee. The technology fee rate for 2016-2017 is assessed at $5.25 per credit hour for all students, regardless of location of study.

After registration, the student must pay the applicable technology fee; this fee is paid directly to Florida State University Student Business Services. Failure to pay this fee will result in a late payment charge being assessed to the student by Florida State University Student Business Services. International Programs has no control over the fee or any associated late payment penalty.

Financial Aid and Financing Study Abroad Workshops

Financial Aid & Financing Study Abroad Workshops will be held at the Askew Student Life Center. See dates and times of workshops below. WALK-INS WELCOME!

  • Tuesday, September 13, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A, 101C Student Life Center
  • Thursday, September 15, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center
  • Tueday, October 4, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center
  • Wednesday, October 5, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center
  • Wednesday, October 13, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center
  • Wednesday, November 2, 2016
    12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center
  • Tuesday, November 8, 2016
    1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Financial Aid Workshop 101A Student Life Center

Deferment Forms

General Program & FSA Fee Liability (Including Withdrawal & Refund Policy)

Application Fee

The $100 application fee is nonrefundable.

Confirmation Deposit

The $1500 confirmation deposit is refundable until the close of business on the deposit’s due date. If an applicant has paid the deposit or been granted a deferred payment plan for the deposit and has not withdrawn from a program as of the close of business on the deposit due date, the applicant becomes fully liable for the confirmation deposit. Students whose offer of admission to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) will not be able to participate but remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit.

Full Program Fee

Program applicants who have demonstrated their intent to participate in the program by payment or by deferral of the confirmation deposit and who have not withdrawn from the program as of the full payment due date become fully liable for the full program fee as of the close of business on the full payment due date.

Refunds of Program Fees

Refunds of program fees WILL BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Cancellation of program by International Programs
  2. Involuntary call to active duty
  3. Death of the student or death in the immediate family (parent, legal guardian, spouse, child, or sibling)

Refunds of program fees will not be granted where a student becomes ineligible to participate in a program for failure to meet or maintain admission requirements.

Partial Refunds of Program Fees

Partial refunds of program fees MAY BE granted in instances of withdrawal prior to the start of the program under the following circumstances:

  1. Illness of the student of such duration or severity that it precludes overseas travel. The student will be required to submit all relevant medical records for review and evaluation by Florida State's University Health Services. University Health Services will advise International Programs’ refund committee of its recommendation. International Programs’ refund committee will notify the student of the decision.
  2. Exceptional circumstances that could not have been foreseen and were beyond the control of the student, as approved by the International Programs’ refund committee.
    • Timely notification in relation to the event that caused the need for withdrawal will be considered in evaluating refund requests. In no instance will a request be considered if it is made after the end of the semester for which the refund is requested.
    • Refunds cannot be granted, under any circumstances, in instances of withdrawal after a program has begun.
    • Applicants who apply and are accepted after the published due dates remain liable for fees in accordance with the published due dates.
  3. Rescission of admission by the Florida State University Office of Admission for failure to meet the conditions of one’s admission. Students whose admission offer to Florida State University is rescinded after the confirmation deposit is paid or deferred (in accordance with the due date) remain fee liable for the confirmation deposit

Submitting Withdrawals, Requests for Refunds, and Release from Fee Liability

All withdrawals, requests for refunds, and requests for release from fee liability must be submitted in writing via email to International Programs. Applicants should include their last name and program code in the subject line of the email.

Alternatively, requests can be submitted in writing to International Programs at the following postal address:

Attention: Refund Committee
Office of FSU International Programs
A5500 University Center
282 Champions Way
P.O. Box 3062420
Tallahassee, FL 32306-2420

Visa Information

England

A Visa is required for US Citizens going to London, England for the following programs: First Year Abroad, and Interns. Please note any program under 6 months in length does not require a visa (except London interns). Anyone interested in taking 2 consecutive semesters (not already participating in the First Year Abroad Program) will be required to obtain a visa and will need to contact International Programs.

International Programs provides support and guidance for the visa application process. Students will be required to apply for their visa through the UK Visa and Immigration Office. All students requiring a visa will be sending their actual passport to the British Consulate for processing. Processing times take a minimum of 4 weeks. For this reason, international travel plans may be limited during the months prior to the start of the program.

Non US Citizens: It is the responsibility of the NON-US Citizen to check with their local consulate to see if a visa is required in order to study abroad in London. If a visa is required, the processing times may take longer than 4 weeks and may require additional visa support documents. Depending on the country of citizenship, an IELTs test to show proof of English proficiency may be required. The test cost about $250 and limited locations and times are available. If you are a non-US citizen, please contact Tina Brooks, an immigration officer, at IP-Visas@fsu.edu.

Full visa requirements and instructions will be provided in the “Visa Packets” linked below. Your visa packet may be in the process of being updated and may not yet be linked. All visa packets will be emailed when updated. Please take note of the following important visa requirements:

Passport Validity: Participants must hold a passport valid for at least 6 months beyond the end of the program and must contain at least 2 empty visa pages. The last three pages of the passport do not count as visa pages.

For First Year Abroad and Two Consecutive Semesters Abroad London Participants:

  • Visa Fee: London FYA and 2 consecutive semester participants will receive visa support but the nature of the application process requires students to apply on their own. Students will be required to apply through the UK Visa and Immigration Office (UKVI) and send their Passports to the British Consulate. The UKVI visa charge is approximately $500. This fee is not included in the London Program Fee. As of April 2015, the UK has implemented a health surcharge for all visitors over 6 months. Current cost is £225 (about $300). The Health Surcharge is not a medical coverage plan but an additional fee to enter the UK. All students are covered under the health insurance plan provided by International Programs.
  • Biometrics: One of the steps to receive the Visa will be to make an appointment for your biometrics screening (finger printing). Please note that the biometrics must be completed at a UK authorized facility and may require travel. A list of UK authorized Biometrics Facilities can be found on the USCIS website.
  • Support in the amount of $15,000: Proof of Financial support must be supplied in the form of original financial aid award letters, an original recent bank statement, or a notarized letter from the bank for an account either in the student’s or parents’ names. (The funds must be liquid and must be shown in financial aid or checking/savings. Retirement, stocks or bonds will not be accepted) You must show that you or your parents have held the required money for a consecutive 28-day period (finishing on the date of the closing balance) ending no more than one month before your application. More information will be supplied in the visa packet.
  • UK Arrival: You must arrive to London via an international flight in order to have your passport/visa stamped. You CANNOT ARRIVE ON A FLIGHT THAT CONNECTS IN IRELAND, as transit via Ireland will not activate your visa.

For London Intern Participants:

  • Visa Fee: London Intern participants will receive visa support but the nature of the application process requires students to apply on their own. Students will be required to apply through BUNAC and the UK Visa and Immigration Office (UKVI) and send their Passports to the British Consulate. The cost to apply and obtain entry clearance is about $1,100. In addition, given the short window from your placement to the start of the program, you will most likely need to expedite the visa. Expediting is an additional $200. Please assume you will need to expedite and budget appropriately. Visa fees are not included in the London Intern Program Fee.
  • Biometrics: One of the steps to receive the Visa will be to make an appointment for your biometrics screening (finger printing). Please note that the biometrics must be completed at a UK authorized facility and may require travel. A list of UK authorized Biometrics Facilities can be found on the USCIS website.
  • Financial Support: Proof of financial support must be supplied in the form of a recent back statement showing proof of sufficient funds, at least $2,500. This can be provided from the student or parent. More information provided in Visa Packet.
  • UK Arrival: You must arrive to London via an international flight in order to have your passport/visa stamped. You CANNOT ARRIVE ON A FLIGHT THAT CONNECTS IN IRELAND, as transit via Ireland will not activate your visa.

Italy

A Visa is required for US Citizens going to Florence for the following programs: Fall, Spring, First Semester Abroad, First Year Abroad and Interns. Please note any program under 90 days in length does not require a visa for U.S. Citizens. Additional visa documentation will be required for participants under the age of 18.

Non US Citizens: It is the responsibility of the NON-US Citizen to check with their local consulate to see if a visa is required in order to study abroad in Florence. If you are a non-US citizen, please contact us at IP-Visas@fsu.edu.

Full visa requirements and instructions will be provided in the “Visa Packets” linked below. Your visa packet may be in the process of being updated and may not yet be linked. All visa packets will be emailed when updated. Please take note of the following important visa requirements:

For all Florence Participants:

  • Passport: A passport valid for at least 6 months beyond the end of the program is required. The passport must also contain at least 2 blank visa pages. The last 3 pages of the passport do not count as visa pages.

For Spring, Fall, First Semester or Interns:

  • Financial Support in the amount of $4,000: Proof of financial support must be supplied in the form of original financial aid award letters, an original recent bank statement, or a notarized letter from the bank from an account either in the student’s or parents’ names. The funds must be shown from a "liquid account"; checking or savings only. More information will be supplied in the visa packet.

For First Year Abroad Students ONLY:

  • Financial Support in the amount of $12,000: Proof of financial support must be supplied in the form of original financial aid award letters, an original recent bank statement, or a notarized letter from the bank from an account either in the student’s or parents’ names. Funds must be shown from a "liquid account"; checking or savings only. More information will be supplied in the visa packet.

Visa Documents:

Florence Spring 2017 Visa Packet

Republic of Panama

A Visa is required for US Citizens going to Panama City, Republic of Panama for the following programs: Fall, Spring, Summer, First Semester Abroad, First Year Abroad and Interns.

International Programs provides support and guidance for the visa application process. Panama participants will not be required to hand in their passport before the program since the application for a visa is completed after arrival in Panama. Even though the visa is applied for in country, visa documents are required to be turned in to International Programs prior to the start of the program.

Non US Citizens: It is the responsibility of the non-US Citizen to check with their local consulate to see if a visa is required in order to study abroad in Panama. If a visa is required, the application will be handled in the same manner for non-US citizens as for US citizens. If you are a non-US citizen, please contact us at IP-Visas@fsu.edu.

Full visa requirements and instructions will be provided in the “Visa Packets” linked below. Your visa packet may be in the process of being updated and may not yet be linked. All visa packets will be emailed when updated. Please take note of the following important visa requirements:

For all Panama Participants:

  • Passport: A passport valid for at least 6 months beyond the end of the program. The passport must also contain at least 2 empty visa pages. The last three pages of the passport do not count as visa pages.
  • Police Background Check and Apostille Certification: A notarized criminal background check will be required with Apostille Certification. Apostille requirements differ from state to state. More information will be provided in the Visa Packet.

Valencia, Spain

A Visa is required for US Citizens going to Valencia, Spain for the following programs: Fall, Spring, First Semester Abroad, First Year Abroad and Interns. Please note any program under 90 days in length does not require a visa for U.S. Citizens.

International Programs provides support and guidance for the visa application process. Students will be required to submit their passport in advance of the Valencia Program so the visa can be affixed inside the passport. For this reason, international travel plans may be limited during the months prior to the start of the program. Additional Visa documentation will be required for participants under the age of 18.

Non US Citizens: It is the responsibility of the non-US Citizen to check with their local consulate to see if a visa is required in order to study abroad in Valencia. If you are a non-US citizen, please contact us at IP-Visas@fsu.edu.

Full visa requirements and instructions will be provided in the “Visa Packets” linked below. Your visa packet may be in the process of being updated and may not yet be linked. All visa packets will be emailed when updated. Please take note of the following important visa requirements:

For all Valencia Participants:

  • Passport: A passport valid for at least 6 months beyond the end of the program. The passport must also contain at least 2 empty visa pages. The last three pages of the passport do not count as visa pages.

For Spring, Fall, First Semester or Interns:

  • Financial Support in the amount of $2,000: Proof of financial support must be supplied in the form of original financial aid award letters, an original recent bank statement, or a notarized letter from the bank from an account either in the student’s or parents’ names. The funds must be shown from a "liquid account"; checking or savings only. More information will be supplied in the visa packet

For First Year Abroad Students ONLY:

All students will need an FBI background check. Do not start the background check until prompted. More information will be supplied in the visa packet.

  • Financial Support in the amount of $6000: Proof of financial support must be supplied in the form of financial aid award letters or a recent bank statement from the student or their parents/legal guardians. The funds must be shown from a “liquid account”; checking or savings only. More information will be supplied in the visa packet.

Visa Documents:

Valencia Spring 2017 Visa Packet

Important Dates & Documents

FSA - Important Dates
Early Application Deadline* April 15, 2017 $100
FSA Application Deadline May 1, 2017* $100
FSA Confirmation Deposit Deadline May 1, 2017* $1,500
Important Forms Due May 17, 2017
Full Payment Due June 7, 2017
IPre-Depart (Orientation) Meeting July TBD

*After the deadline has passed, applications will be accepted on a space available basis. FSA students receive the $100 early application discount if they apply by April 15.

Documents